Faculty of Arts Research

UNIVERSITY OF ILORIN

FACULTYOF ARTS
HAND BOOK

ACADEMIC SESSIONS
2020/2021-2021/2022

ISSUED BY
THE DEAN’S OFFICE
FACULTY OF ARTS

Printed by
Unilorin Press
University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria

FOREWORD
A Faculty handbook is an important document for a student who is not only hoping to do well within the University system but also willing to succeed after it or in the world at large. This is why we congratulate all our students both new and old for being admitted to the heart beat of this University, the Faculty of Arts of the University of Ilorin, a University that is better by far.
Students of the Faculty of Arts are hereby advised to carefully study the content of this Handbook and abide by the rules and regulations contained therein. Useful information contained in the Handbook include: philosophy and objectives of the Faculty of Arts, admission requirements of the available progammmes in the Faculty, registration procedure and list of academic staff in the various departments. More importantly, the Handbook has information for students on examinations, regulations governing First Degree Programmes as well as general faculty rules and advice to students. Course titles of programme per level with credit load and status are also provided for the benefit of students.

Professor Abdullahi Salih Abubakar
Dean of Arts
August, 2015

FACULTY OFFICIALS
2020/2021 Academic session

Dean
Professor Abdullahi Salih Abubakar

Sub-Dean
Dr. Oludolapo Ojediran

Faculty Officer
Mr. M. O. Oyinloye

Secretary
Mr. Olusegun. Tanimola Johnson

Faculty Accountant
Mr. C. C. Emelogu, CNA


2. SUCCESSIVE DEANS OF THE FACULTY

Professor O. Awobuluyi - September, 1976 - 31th July, 1980
Professor I.B. Balogun - 1st August, 1980 - 31th July, 1984
Professor Ade N. Obayemi - 1st August, 1984 - 28th February, 1987
Professor O.O. Olajubu - 1st August, 1987 - 31th July, 1992
Professor P.A. Dopamu - 1st August, 1992 - September, 1996
Professor Sam Adewoye (Acting) - 18th October, 1996 - 14th November,1996
Professor Y.A. Quadri - 15th November, 1996 - 31th July, 1998
Professor A Nasir - 1st August, 1998 - 31th July, 2000
Professor E.A. Adegbija - 1st August, 2000 - 29th March, 2001
Professor P.A. Dopamu (Acting) - 29th March, 2001 - 14th September, 2001
Professor R.D. Abubakre - 15th September, 2001 - 31st July, 2003
Professor R.O. Lasisi - 1st August, 2003 - 31th July, 2005
Professor Musa Ali Ajetunmobi - 1st August, 2005 - 31th July, 2007
Professor R.A. Akanmidu - 1st August, 2007 - 31th July, 2009
Professor Z.I. Oseni - 1st August, 2009 - 31th July, 2011
Professor C.A. Bodunde - 1st August, 2011 - 31th July, 2013
Professor Ayo Akinwaale - 1st August, 2013 - 31th July, 2015
Professor Ahmad S. Abdussalam - 1st August, 2015 - 31th July, 2017
Professor Oyeronke Olademo - 1st August, 2017 - 31th July, 2019
Professor A.A. Adeoye - 1st August, 2019 - 31th July, 2021
Professor A.S. Abubakar - 1st August, 2021 - Till Date

3. FACULTY DEAN AND HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS COMMITTEE
S/No. Name Department
1 Prof. A. S. Abubakar Dean Chairman
2 Dr Y. A. Abdullahi Member Arabic
3 Prof. Christiana O. Medubi Member English
4 Dr. Afsat Sanni-Suleiman Member French
5 Dr. J. O. Friday-Otun Member Linguistics & Nigerian Languages
6 Prof. S. Ikibe Member The Performing Arts
7 Prof. A. I. Ali-agan Member Religions
8 Dr. B. O. Ibrahim Secretary History & International Studies

4. FACULTY REPRESENTATIVES
Dr. Oludolapo Ojediran
Dr. A. A. Adebisi Faculty Representatives on Senate
Prof. O. Adeyemi Board of Postgraduate School
Prof. Victoria. A. Alabi Senate Research Committee
Prof. I. A. Jawodo Senate Estimate Committee
Prof. S. O. Aghalino
Dr. Oludolapo Ojediran GSE/TEC 301
Business Committee on Senate
Prof. J. O. Ojuade Business Committee on Congregation
Prof. C. A. Bodunde Nigerian Universities Research and Development
Prof. A. A. Adeoye Library and Publications Committee
Prof. Y. O. Imam
Dr. A. A. Salaty Junior Staff Appointments and Promotions Committee
K. Rufai-Ahmad Convocation and Ceremonials Committee
Prof. A. G. Alamu General Studies Committee/GNS
Dr. T. S. Adeola Merit Award Committee
Dr. Hassanat F. Abubakar-Hamid Examinations, Scholarships and Prizes Committee
Dr. Oludolapo Ojediran
O. C. Omolewu Time-Table and Room Usages Committee
Prof. A. S. Abdulsalam Academic Planning and Curriculum Development
Sabina N. Nwokeji Communications Committee
A. G. Adegbite Faculty Board of Agriculture
Dr. Foluke R. Aliyu-Ibrahim Faculty Board of Basic Medical Sciences
Dr. Theresa N. Odeigha Faculty Board of Social Sciences
Dr. Samiat O. Abubakre Faculty Board of Management Sciences
Dr. K. M. U. Gbodofu Faculty Board of Clinical Sciences
Dr. S. O. Afolabi Faculty Board of Education
Dr. P. U. Nwosu Faculty Board of Engineering
Dr. I. Kankawi Faculty Board of Environmental Sciences
Dr. H. M. B. Musa Faculty Board of Law
Dr. T. S. Arinde Faculty Board of Life Sciences
Dr. K. A. Abdullahi Faculty Board of Physical Sciences
Prof. Binta F. Ibrahim Faculty Board of Communication and Information Science
Kifayat A. Olufadi-Gambari Institute of Education
Dr. K. A. Rafiu Faculty Board of Veterinary Medicine
Dr. S. O. Aboyeji Faculty Board of Pharmaceutical Science
Prof. H. O. Adeosun University Admission Committee
Dr. C. O. Ogunkunle Certificate Screening Committee
(Other Faculty)
Prof. S. T. Babatunde Faculty Board of Centre for International Education
M. O. Olorunnibe Centre for Open and Distance Learning
Prof. A. S. Abdulsalam
Prof. Oyinkan C. Medubi Committee on Review of Academic Programme
Dr. O. T. Okewande Advancement Promotion Committee
Prof. I. O. Sanusi Examination Misconduct Investigation Committee
Dr. J. O. Friday-Otun School of Preliminary Studies Board
Prof. Oyeronke Olademo Faculty Ethical Review Committee
Dr. Mary C. Amaechi Faculty Webbing Committee
Prof. A. A. Adeoye Quality Assurance and Monitoring Committee
Dr. Saidat A. O. Hamzat Dress Code Committee
Prof. I. A. Abubakar Environmental Committee
Dr K. N. Afolayan Sports Committee
Dr. Lydia B. Akande Welfare Committee
Prof. I. O. Sanusi Technical Committee on Promotions (Senior)
Prof. O. Adeyemi Technical Committee on Promotions (Junior)
Prof. A. A. Adeoye Accreditation Commitee
Prof. A. S. Abdulsalam Mentoring Committee
Prof. A. G. Fakuade Faculty Research and Publication Committee
Prof. R. W. Omotoye Lecture, Symposium and Conference Committee
Prof. I. A. Jawondo Fund raising and Investment Committee
Dr R. O. Ogunade Unilorin Property Board
Dr. S. O. Oyewo Senior Staff Housing Allocation Committee
Prof. B. O. Yusuf Physical Planning and Capital Works Committee
O. O. Ogunbiyi Servicom Committee
Dr. Ibukun T. Osuolale University Quiz and Debate
Dr. L. E. Odeh Ilorin Business School
Dr Bolanle E. Arokoyo University Undergraduates’ Project Committee
O. A. Oyelabi Technical Committee on Results Computation
M. O. Durosinmi FASA Adviser
Prof. A. A. Abdulssalam Exam Misconduct Committee

FACULTY BOARDS AND COMMITTEE
A. Statutory
i. Faculty Board
Dean - Chairman
All Faculty Academic Staff - Member
Other Faculty/Library Reprehensive - Member
Faculty Officer - Secretary

ii. Board of Examiners
Dean - Chairman
All Professors in the Faculty - Member
All Heads of Departments - Member
Deputy Registrar (Academic) - Attendance
Faculty Officer - Secretary

iii. Promotions Panel/Committee/Board of Studies
Dean - Chairman
All Heads of Departments - Member
All Professors - Member
Professor from a related Discipline - Member
Faculty Officer - Secretary

iv. Postgraduate Committee
Dean - Chairman
Faculty Postgraduate Coordinators - Member and Vice-Chairman
Heads of Departments - Member
All Professors - Member
Sub-Dean - Member
Departmental Postgraduate Coordinator - Member
Faculty Officer - Secretary

B. None Statutory
I Alore Editorial Board
a. Membership
Prof. A.G. Fakuade
Prof. (Mrs) Oyinkan C. Medubi
Prof. P.O. Abioje
Prof. S.O. Aghalino
Prof. I.O. Sanusi
Prof. S.O. Ikibe
Dr. A.M. Usman
Dr. Y.O. Tijani

b. Terms of Reference
i. To receive scholarly papers for publication
ii To assess or cause assessment of such received papers before publication.
iii. To ensure high standard of production
iv. To source good marketer for the journal
v. To deal with such matters as are referred to it by the Faculty Board or the Dean.

II. Welfare Committee

a. Membership
Dr. Lydia B. Akande - Chairperson
Dr. S.O. Aboyeji - Member
Dr. M.O. Oyetade - Member
Dr. A.A. Adebisi - Member
A.A. Amali - Member
G. Oguike - Member
Sarat A. Salihu - Member
S.A. Adebayo - Secretary

b. Terms of Reference
i. To maintain the Faculty Senior Staff Common Room
ii. To arrange for the comfort of members through provision of recreational facilities
iii. To deal with all such matters as referred to it by the Faculty Board or Dean.

III. Fund Raising Committee
a. Membership
Prof. I.A. Jawondo - Chairman
Rahmat A. Adeyemi - Member
Dr. B.O. Ibrahim - Member
Nurat B. Salihu - Member
A.S. Agboola - Member
Dr. Agnes. O. Adeyeye - Member
Monsurat A. Nurudeen - Member
C.C. Eweama - Member
B. Issa - Secretary

b. Terms of Reference
i. To source fund for the Faculty through donation by individuals
or corporate bodies at Local, National and or International level
ii. To invest through legitimate means and accordance with the policy of the University, towards revenue generation for the Faculty.
iii. To deal with all such matters as referred to it by the Faculty Board or Dean

IV. Use of Language Laboratory Committee
a. Membership
Dean - Chairman
HOD (Arabic) - Member
HOD (English) - Member
HOD (French) - Member
HOD (History & Int’l Studies) - Member
HOD (LNL) - Member
HOD (PFA) - Member
HOD (Religions) - Member
Faculty Officer - Secretary.

b. Terms of Reference
i. To coordinate the use of Faculty Language Laboratory and the Phonetics Laboratory in collaboration with the Sub-Dean.
ii. To maintain the laboratories and deal with such matters as referred to it by the Faculty Board or Dean.

V. Examination Misconduct Investigation Committee
a. Membership
Prof. P.O. Abioje - Chairman
Prof. A.A. Adeoye - Member
Prof. A.G. Alamu - Member
Dr. I. Abubakar - Member
Faculty Officer - Secretary

b. Terms of Reference
i. To investigate all cases of examination misconduct and related offences
ii. To make appropriate recommendation to the Dean on such cases in accordance with University regulations and procedure
iii. To deal with such matters as referred to it by the Dean or Faculty Board.

VI. Faculty Technical Committee on Result Computetaion
a. Membership
O.A. Oyelabi - Chairman A.O. Meleki - Member
F.Y. Atteh - Member
O.C. Omolewu - Member
J,S, Abdulkareem - Member
Dr. A.J. Aboyeji - Member
A.G. Adegbite - Secretary

b. Terms of Reference
i. To consider computed results of students. Good Academic Standing as may be presented to the Dean by the Departments before Faculty Board’s consideration.
ii. To consider computed results of final year students as in (i) above).
iii. In all cases, to ascertain credit load of each course, status of each course, accuracy of scores and their grades as well as Grade Point (GP), Weighted Grade Points(WGP) Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA), Total Credits Offered (TCO) , Total Credits Passed (TCP) and class of Degree in or not in Good Standing as the case may be.
iv. To deal with all such matters as are referred to it by the Faculty Board or Dean

VII Faculty Ethical Review Committee
Prof. Oyeronke Olademo - Chairperson
Prof. A.A. Abdussalan - Member
Dr. Y.O. Tijani - Member
Dr. S.O. Oyewo - Member
Dr. K.N. Afolayan - Member
Dr. S.O. Afolabi - Member
Dr. A.D. Shittu - Secretary

VIII Faculty Library Development Committee
Prof. A.A. Adeoye - Chairman
Prof. Binta F. Ibrahim - Member
S.Y. Danladi - Member
Dr. D.G. Yusuf - Member
Dr. O.F. Siwoku-Awi - Member
Dr. O.D. Ogunlola - Member
Dr. M.D. Musa - Member
Kifayat A Olufadi-Gambari - Secretary

IX Faculty Webbing Committee
Dr. A.A. Adebisi - Chairman
Dr. Hassanat F. Abubakar-Hamid- Member
O.A. Oyelabi - Member
Bamitale J. Balogun - Member
Temitope Yusuf - Member
O.A. Ajetomobi - Member
Adefunke K, Adebayo - Secretary

X Faculty Quality Assurance And Monitoring Committee
Prof. A.A. Adeoye - Chairman
Prof. A.G. Alamu - Member
Prof. A.A. Abdussalam - Member
Prof. P.O. Abioje - Member
Prof. H.O. Adeosun - Member
Dr. Bolanle E. Arokoyo - Member
Dr. S.O. Oyewo - Member
Dr. C.O. Ogunkunle - Member
Dr. K.A. Rafiu - Member
Dr. O.R. Ogunade - Secretary

XI Faculty Dress Code Committee
Dr. Mary T. Daniel - Chairperson
Dr. Shadiat O.O. Shuaib - Member
Dr. M.O. Alabi - Member
C.T. Babatunde - Member
Dr. M.O. Olorunnibe - Member
Dr. D.H. Komolafe - Member
K. Rufai-Ahmed - Secretary

XII Faculty Environmental Committee
Dr. Oludolapo Ojediran - Chairperson
Dr. A.J. Aboyeji - Member
F.A. Akinsipe - Member
Dr. A.A. Salaty - Member
Nurat B. Saliu - Member
Dr. I. Abdulmalik - Member
Dr. J.O. Osaji - Member
S.A. Yahya - Member
A. Na’Allah - Member
I.A. Muritala - Secretary

XIII Faculty Technical Committee on Promotion (Senior)
Prof. I.O. Sanusi - Chairman
Prof. S.O. Aghalino - Member
Prof. A.A. Abdussalam - Member
Prof. P.O. Abioje - Member
Prof. A.G. Alamu - Secretary

IXV Faculty Technical Committee on Promotion (Junior)
Prof. O. Adeyemi - Chairman
Dr. A.J Aboyeji - Member
Dr. S.O. Oyewo - Member
Dr. K.M.U. Gbodofu - Member
Dr. Foluke R. Aliyu-Ibrahim - Secretary

XV Faculty Accreditation Committee
Prof. A.A. Adeoye - Chairman
Prof. I. Bariki - Member
Prof. I.A. Jawondo - Member
Prof. A.A. Abdussalam - Member
Dr. I.O. Dunmade - Member
Dr. K.A. Rafiu - Member
Dr. A.B. Yusuf - Secretary

XVI Faculty Mentoring Committee
Prof. A.S. Abdussalam - Chairman
Prof. Oyeronke Olademo - Member
Prof. S.O. Aghalino - Member
Prof. Victoria A. Alabi - Member
Prof. I.O. Sanusi - Member
Prof, A.G. Fakuade - Member
Prof. I.A. Jawondo - Secretary

XVII Faculty Research and Publication Committee
Prof. Oyeronke Olademo - Chairperson
Dr. P.U. Nwosu - Member
Dr. A.L. Adekilekun - Member
Dr. C.I. Nnaji - Member
Dr. S.E. Iyanda - Member
Dr. J.O. Friday-Otun - Member
Dr.T. Oloruntoba-Oju - Member
Dr. A.O. Fahm - Secretary

XVIII Faculty Lecture, Symposium and Conference Committee
Prof. A.G. Fakuade - Chairman
Prof. P.F. Adebayo - Member
Dr. A. Mahamoud-Mukadam - Member
Dr. Foluke R. Aliyu-Ibraheem - Member
Dr. Ibukun T. Osuolale-Ajayi - Member
Dr. S.O. Aboyeji - Member
J.A. Atoyebi - Member
L. Adeshina - Member
Dr. O.D. Ogunlola - Member
Dr. K.A. Abdullahi - Secretary

XIX Faculty Sports Committee
Dr. T.S. Adeola - Chairman
Dr. J.M.K. Mbombo - Member
R. Onagun - Member
Nurat B. Salihu - Member
T. Olalusi - Member
Dr. Adelaide K. Dongmo - Member
Dr. Ibukun T. Osuolale-Ajayi - Member
Dr. A. Zubair - Secretary

XX Faculty Student and Staff Relations Committee
M.O. Durosimi - Chairman
K. Olalusi - Member
Dr. A.B. Ambali - Member
F.Y. Atteh - Member
R. Onagun - Member
O.I. Oniye - Member
O.A. Ajetomobi - Secretary

XXI Faculty University Undergraduates’ Project Committee
Dr. Bolanle E. Arokoyo - Chairperson
O.A. Oyelabi - Member
M.I. Akeyede - Member
F. Akinsipe - Member
Florence C. Nwosu - Member
Mosurat A. Nurudeen - Member
Dr. S.O. Aboyeji - Secretary

XXII Faculty of Arts Abstract Committee
Prof. I.A. Jawondo - Chairman
Prof. H.O. Adeosun - Member
Prof. R.W. Omotoye - Member
Dr. A.A. Salaty - Member
Dr. Ruth A. Adimula - Member
Dr.K.N. Afolayan - Member
Dr. S.O. Oyewo - Secretary

XXIII Faculty of Arts Quiz and Debate Committee
Dr. Ibukun T. Osuolale-Ajayi - Chairperson
Dr. A.L. Adekilekun - Member
Abosede O. Akinfenwa - Member
Dr. A.D. Diop - Member
Danladi Yusuf - Member
A.S. Waziri - Member
Florence C. Nwosu - Secretary

Dean’s Office Staff
S/N Name Post
1 Mr. M.O. Oyinloye Faculty Officer
2 Mr. O.T. Johnson .Dean’s Secretary
3 Mr. C.C. Emeologu Faculty Accountant
4 Mrs. I.T. George
5 Mr. Akeem Balogun
6 Mr. Bello Abdullateef
7 Mrs. Nike Lawal
8 Mrs. Saka Balogun-Ajibola
9 Mr. Babalola I.T. Officer
10 Mrs. Shehu Jemeelah
11 Mrs. B.L. Afolabi
12 Mrs. Yemisi J. Ajayi F.O’s Secretary
13 Mrs. Victoria Y. Obafemi
14 Mr. Kehinde Lamidi Driver
15 Mr. Samson Adebisi

GENERAL INFORMATION TO ALL STUDENTS OF THE FACULTY ON STUDENTS’ REGISTRATION

A. REGISTRATION PROCEDURE FOR FRESH STUDENTS
1. STEP 1: Bio-Data Registration
1. Once you have been cleared, visit the University of Ilorin Website (www.unilorin.edu.ng) and click on the Undergraduate Portal link.
2. Click on the Login link on the Portal and login using your JAMB Registration Number as Login ID and Surname as your default password.
3. Fill the displayed Bio-data template carefully. You will be required to change your initial Password from your Surname to a new one which should be confidential and known to you alone. You are advised to choose a password that is difficult to guess but easy for you to remember. In case you forget your password, the password recovery is available online after payment of necessary charges. Please ensure that the spellings and arrangements of your names are correct because no change is allowed after Matriculation.
2. STEP 2: Course Registration
a. After the completion of the Steps above, click on Course Registration link to proceed with your course registration.

b. Print out your preliminary course registration form and forward to your Level Adviser, who should authenticate the courses you have selected before payment. Once you register for wrong courses you will need to use Add/Drop form to make amendment(s).
NOTE: Any Student who fails to authenticate the selected courses with the Level Adviser before payment, does so at his own risk.
c. After authentication, go back to the website and register as advised by your Level Adviser.
d. Your customized charges and levies would be displayed and you would be requested to make online payment for approved charges, using your ATM Verve or Master Card.
NOTE: Students are expected to pay the prevailing bank charges in addition to the main University charges and therefore, must ensure that there is enough balance in their bank account to pay the charges.
e. If payment is successful, you are to print the payment receipt and four copies of the final course form.
f. Present the copies to your Level Adviser and Faculty Officer for appropriate signatures and collect the original copy from the Faculty Office. Keep your copy safely as you would need it for your Examinations.

PLEASE NOTE THAT YOUR REGISTRATION IS INCOMPLETE EVEN AFTER SUBMISSION ONLINE UNTIL YOUR FORMS ARE ENDORSED BY YOUR LEVEL ADVISER AND FACULTY OFFICER WITHIN THE REGISTRATION PERIOD.
3. Add and/or Drop Form
NOTE: The form can be accessed after 3 weeks of registration. Processing of ADD/DROP Form is done on Semester basis and all procedures for actualizing ADD/DROP must be completed within the stipulated period.

Procedure for Add/Drop
Students who have concerns regarding registration (e.g. error in registration) can add or drop courses. This should be done online without downloading any form by the affected students. The concerned students are required to pay online and effect changes as recommended by their Level Adviser and as approved by the Head of Department. Students should note that ADD/DROP of courses should be done within the period stipulated online by the University as lateness will not be condoned.
1. Adding of Courses
A student may add a course by completing the Add and Drop Form before the end of the third week of the semester in which the course is being offered.
2. Dropping of Courses
A student may drop a course or courses by completing the Add and Drop Form before the end of the fifth week of the Semester in which the course(s) is being offered. Any student who withdraws from a course without acceptable explanation after half of it has been given, shall be deemed to have failed the course.

All Registration and Add and Drop Forms must be duly signed by the Dean of the Faculty, the Head of Department and the Faculty Officer.

4. Payment Procedure
Students are to note that all payments shall be done online and shall be through the use of ATM cards as indicated on the University Portal.

B. REGISTRATION PROCEDURE FOR RETURNING STUDENTS
1. Visit the Unilorin Website (www.unilorin.edu.ng) and click on the Undergraduate Portal link.
2. Click on Login link on the Portal and login using your Matriculation Number as Login ID and Surname as your Default password.
3. You are required to change your initial Password from your Surname to a new one which should be confidential and known only to you. You are advised to choose a password that is difficult to guess but memorable to you. In case you forget your password, the password recovery is available online after payment of necessary charges.
4. Please be mindful of the spellings and arrangements of your names during registration.
NOTE: If you are a student of the University of Ilorin and yourname does not appear on the Good Standing List, interact with your Level Adviser to confirm your status.

5. Good Standing
1. If you are in Good Standing or on Probation, click on Course Registration link and register for appropriate and relevant courses. You are to register for courses failed before registering for current level courses. Seek guidance from your Level Adviser.
2. Print out preliminary Course Registration Form and present to your Level Adviser, who should authenticate the courses you have selected before you make payment.
3. After authentication, go back to the website and register as advised by your Level Adviser.
4. Your customized charges and levies would be displayed and you would be requested to make online payment for approved charges, using your ATM Verve or Master Card.
NOTE: Students are expected to pay the prevailing bank charges in addition to the main University charges and therefore, must ensure that there is enough balance in their bank account to pay the charges.
5. If payment is successful, you are to print the payment receipt and four copies of the final course form.
6. Present the copies to your Level Adviser and Faculty Officer for appropriate signatures and collect the original copy from the Faculty Office. Keep your copy safely as you would need it for your Examinations.
7. NOTE: Any Student who fails to authenticate selected courses before payment does so at his/her own risk. Once you pay and register for courses you are not expected to offer, you will need to use the Add/Drop form to make amendment(s).
6. If Not in Good Standing
If you are not in good standing, further instructions would be displayed as you may no longer be able to continue with your current programme. You are then advised to download a change of course form, on account of not being in good standing (where applicable). This attracts an online payment of Two Thousand Naira (N2000.00) only or as may be reviewed by the University.

Steps on Change of Course(s)
1. Click on Change of Course link
2. Make online payment for Change of Course form on account of not being in good standing (provided you are qualified)
3. Download the form
4. Complete the form manually
5. Submit duly approved Transfer Form to the Directorate of Academic Support Services for processing and subsequent registration.
OTHER ISSUES
7. Add and/or Drop Form
NOTE: The form can be accessed after 3 weeks of registration. Processing of ADD/DROP Form is done on Semester basis and all procedures for actualizing ADD/DROP must be completed within the stipulated period.
Procedures for ADD/DROP
There are two procedures involved. The first is for students who are still within the range of 48 maximum credits and the other is for those seeking to register above 48 credits per session.
(A) Students within the Approved Maximum of 48 Credits
Students who have concerns regarding registration (e.g. error in registration) can add or drop courses. This should be done online without downloading any form by the affected students. The concerned students are required to pay online and effect changes as recommended by their Level Adviser and approved the Head of Department. Students should note that ADD/DROP of courses should be done within the period stipulated online by the University as lateness will not be condoned.
1. Adding of Courses
A student may add a course by completing the Add and Drop Form before the end of the third week of the semester in which the course is being offered.

2. Dropping of Courses
A student may drop a course or courses by completing the Add and Drop Form before the end of the fifth week of the Semester in which the course(s) is being offered. Any student who withdraws from a course without acceptable explanation after half of it has been given, shall be deemed to have failed the course.

All Registration and Add and Drop Forms must be duly signed by the Dean of the Faculty, the Head of Department and the Faculty Officer.
(B) Procedure for Additional Credit(s) Above the 48 Credits Limit
1. Payment for the Additional credit(s) is done at the prevailing cost, which must be online.
2. The form is printed online from the portal and manually completed. Note that the permission of the Head of Department and approval of the Dean are required when you are adding above the maximum of 24 credits allowed per semester.
3. The form is to be forwarded to the Deputy Registrar (Academic Support Services) through the Dean with a copy of Course Registration Form and payment receipt attached to the form and the approval of the Dean, as in (2) above.
4. After approval by Academic Support Services, changes requested will be effected and an alert will also be sent to the concerned student who should print a new Course Registration Form from the portal. This form supersedes the earlier one.
5. The approved Additional Credit Form; Payment Receipt and old Course Form must be attached to the new Course Form and forwarded to the Level Adviser and Faculty Officer for endorsement.
6. Please note that the Academic Support Services will not treat any request for more than 24 credits per semester, if all the requirements in (2) and (3) are not met.

PLEASE NOTE THAT YOUR REGISTRATION IS NOT COMPLETE EVEN AFTER SUBMISSION ONLINE UNTIL YOUR FORMS ARE ENDORSED BY YOUR LEVEL ADVISER AND FACULTY OFFICER WITHIN THE REGISTRATION PERIOD.
8. Payment Procedure
Students are to note that all payments shall be online and shall be through the use of ATM cards on the University Portal.
9. Final Year Screening Exercise
(i) The screening exercise should commence at the 300 level so as to enable students have enough time for screening before graduation;
(ii) The screening committee should present its report at least two weeks before the commencement of each semester examinations;
(ii) A new verification fee of N3,500 or such amount as agreed to at the parley between the University Administration and representatives of the students’ Union, as directed by Senate, be approved;
(iv) All copies of external results obtained for screening purpose be kept centrally in the Admission Office;
(v) A late verification fee of N1,500 shall be paid by students who are late for verification;
(vi) The time line during which a student should conclude verification shall not exceed one academic session following a student’s completion of academic graduation requirements.

10. Waivers for Overstayed Students with not more than two Outstanding Courses (not applicable to students who matriculated after 2011/2012 session)
Any student who had exhausted his year(s) of stay in the University but still falls short of normal graduation requirements, by NOT MORE THAN TWO COURSES will be processed for graduation with a Pass Degree irrespective of his CGPA.

11. Status of a Course
A course shall be classified as “Compulsory”, “Required” or “Elective” in a given degree programme of the University.

(a) Compulsory Courses:
These are courses within the student’s discipline which must be taken and passed. Marks scored will count towards graduation and student cannot graduate without passing them.

(b) Required Courses:
These are courses outside the student’s discipline, i.e. a Subsidiary course that must be taken and passed.

(c) Elective Courses:
These are courses within and/ or outside a student’s discipline from which a student may select a number for the purpose of fulfilling the requirements for the award of the Degree. However, in order to graduate, a student must pass enough elective courses to meet the minimum number of Credits required for the award of the degree.

12. Course Requirements
Each student shall satisfy the specific requirements of his Degree Programme as contained in the Faculty entries.

13. Transfer Cases
a. The University will entertain cases of students wishing to transfer from the University as a normal expression of their choice.
b. The University also welcomes request(s) from candidates for transfer into her Programmes on the following conditions:
i. Suitability based on the prevailing Unilorin admission requirements at the year of admission into his previous University;
ii. Minimum CGPA of 3.00;
iii. Payment of the prevailing Transfer/Acceptance fee;
iv. Good conduct; and
v. Spend a minimum of two sessions in the University beforegraduation.

14. Admission to and Withdrawal from Courses:
(a) Registration of Courses
Registration for course or courses must be done during the first two weeks of the first semester. There is penalty for late registration.

(b) Late Registration
Late Registration closes at the end of the 4th week of the first Semester after which a student is deemed to have voluntarily withdrawn.

15. Intra-University Transfer
Only students who are not in good academic standing at the end of a Session shall be allowed to transfer to other programmes within the University, subject to the following guidelines.
(a) The maximum number of years a transferred student can spend on a programme shall be counted from the time he/she starts the new programme.
(b) The number of transfers a student can enjoy within the University shall not exceed one.
(c) A student transferring to a new programme must satisfy the basic admission requirements for the new programme at time of first registration, and take the package of courses prescribed for the new programme in order to meet the requirements for the award of the degree.
(d) Transfer shall only take place at the beginning of a new academic session.
(e) On the approval of a transfer (change of major subject) by the Head(s) of Department(s) and Dean(s) concerned, a letter shall be issued by the Registrar to the student and copied to the relevant Head(s) of Department(s) and Dean(s) indicating the transfer (change of major subject) that has been approved.

16. Continuous Evaluation
i. Continuous assessment shall constitute at least 30% in theoretical questions and 40% in practical questions of the marks assigned to the course. However, Continuous Assessment which should be conducted at least twice before the Examination, will now carry a minimum of 40% with effect from 2015/2016 academic session.

ii. Continuous Assessment should be carried out at least two(2) weeks before the commencement of Eexamination, this would ensure that students have a good opportunity to improve on their grades.

17. Examinations
(a) Each course shall normally be examined at the end of the semester in which it is completed. Not more than one course shall be examined in one paper.
(b) Examination shall last a minimum of one-hour (except for computer based courses which may vary as appropriate) and not more than three courses can be examined at thesame level in a day.
(c) A pass letter grade in any course shall be one of the letters A, B, C, D and E while F denotes failure except in peculiar programmes.
(d) (i) A student can only repeat a course if he/she failed it on an earlier occasion, and
(ii) Where a course has been repeated, the Grade Points earned at all attempts shall count towards the Cumulative Grade Point Average.
(e) All grades must be uploaded onto the University portal and submitted through the Dean’s Office to the Academic Support Services not later than four (4) weeks after the examinations.
(f) Results of all courses including Computer Based Examinations (CBE) that involve External Examiners shall be released only after they have been approved by the External Examiner(s).
(g) For the regulations governing the conduct of examinations in the University, see relevant section on Conduct of Examination in this Academic Programme.
(h) Official Transcripts of examination shall be issued to students on request and payment of prescribed fees

18. Scoring and Grading System for 2014/2015 intake
(a) One of the letter grades A, B, C, D, E and F shall be used in reporting a student’s performance in a course.

(b) Letter grade, where applicable, shall be assigned to percentage scores and carry grade points as tabulated below:
Percentage Scores Letter Grades Grade Points
70 – 100 A 5
60 – 69 B 4
50 – 59 C 3
45 – 49 D 2
40 – 44 E 1
0 – 39 F 0

(c) Every course lecturer shall report a student’s performance in both marks and letter grades at the end of each semester.
i. Commencement of full implementation of the Four (4) Point Grading System as prescribed by NUC is with effect from the 2015/2016 academic session. Consequently, the pass mark for all courses including GNS and GSE will be 45% as well as a minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 1.50 for good standing. However, there are exceptions as contained in sections 22 and 23.

ii. The new 4 Point Grading System will be reflected as follows:
SCORE LETTER GRADE GRADE POINT
70 and above A 5
60 – 69 B 4
50 – 59 C 3
45 – 49 D 2
0 – 44 F 0

(d) Grade Point Average (GPA)
A student’s semester Grade Point Average (GPA) shall be computed by multiplying the Grade Point (GP) attained in each course by the course credit(s), and then summing these up and dividing by the total credits taken for the semester, where applicable.
(e) Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)
Where applicable, a Student’s Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) is the up-to- date grade point based on all previous results. To compute the CGPA for a student, the Grade Points multiplied by the respective course credits for all the Semesters are added and then divided by the total credits of all courses registered for by the student.

19. Examiners
(a) (i) For each course, there shall be a panel of not less than three Internal Examiners.
One of them shall normally be the Head of Department, who shall be designated the Chief Examiner and shall have overall responsibility for Examinations within the Department.
(ii) The Panel shall set, moderate the questions and mark the answer scripts. The computer-based examinations shall also be moderated. Panel members shall also jointly sign the draft question papers and the examination results before the latter are submitted to the Dean of the Faculty.
(iii) The absence of one member of a Panel shall not affect the validity of a draft question paper or an Examination Result.
(b) External Examiners shall be appointed to participate in the evaluation of all final year as well as other levels where applicable and submit a report on the same to the Vice-Chancellor copying both the Dean of Faculty and the Head of Department concerned.

20. Good Academic Standing
(a) For 100 Level Students
For a 100 level student to remain in good academic standing (i.e. not be advised to withdraw from the University) the following conditions must be satisfied:
Student in the Faculties of Agriculture, Arts, Communication & Information Sciences, Education, Environmental Sciences, Law, Life Sciences, Management Sciences, Physical Sciences and Social Sciences as well as Nursing Science in the Faculty of Clinical Sciences must maintain a Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 1.50 at the end of the academic year.

(b) For 200, 300 and 400 Level Students
For a student to be in good academic standing in the Faculty of Arts, a minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 1.50 must be maintained at the end of each academic year.

21. Probation
For 200,300 and 400 Level Students
(a) A fresh student in the Faculty of Arts, whose Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) is below 1.50 at the end of a particular session shall be on probation for one academic year.

Fresh 200/300 level students, (including transferred students) shall not be on probation and shall be required to withdraw from the University.
(b) A student on probation shall be so informed in writing by the Registrar through the Faculty Officer indicating the number of extra Grade Points the student needs to remove the deficiency in his academic records in order to be in good academic standing at the end of the “probationary period”.
(c) A student whose Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) is found to be at least 1.50 at the end of a probationary period, shall be restored to normal student status and be informed in writing by the Registrar through the Faculty Officer.

22. Clarification
(i) A fresh 100 level student who is not in good academic standing as specified in 22 above at the end of his 100 level shall be advised to withdraw from the University.
(ii) A fresh 200 or 300 level student who is not in good academic standing as specified in 22 above at the end of his first year shall be advised to withdraw from the University.
(iii) A fresh student who has been advised to withdraw from the programme because he/she fails to satisfy some other requirements for good academic standing and is absorbed into another programme at 200 level, shall be on probation if he/she is not in good academic standing at the end of his first year in the new programme.

23. Withdrawal
A student whose Cumulative Grade Point Average is below 1.50 at the end of the probationary period shall be advised to withdraw from the programme to which he was admitted.

Clarification
Withdrawal here means withdrawal from a Programme rather than from a Faculty (except for fresh students who shall be advised to withdraw from the University) in accordance with the NUC directive on Minimum Academic Standards. This means that a student who is advised to withdraw from a programme may be absorbed into another programme even within the same Faculty/Department.

24. Maximum Time Permitted for a Degree
A maximum period of 5 or 6 years (as the case may be) is allowed for a 3 or 4 years’ degree programme respectively for the award of a classified degree or unclassified degree (as the case may be).

25. Classification of Degrees
Four classes of Degree shall be awarded based on the Cumulative Grade Point Average as follows:
CLASS OF DEGREE RANGE OF CGPA
First Class Honours 4.50-5.00
Second Class Honours (Upper Division) 3.50-4.49
Second Class Honours (Lower Division) 2.40-3.49
Third Class Honours 1.50-2.39

26. Absence from University Examinations
(a) A grade of Incomplete (I) shall be awarded in a course to a student who completed the course except that he/she was absent from final examination in that course. However, upon a written application, a student who has been absent from an examination with reasonable excuse (supported by a certificate issued by the Director of Health Services - if it is on the grounds of ill-health or any proven cases of emergency) may obtain permission of the Faculty Board to write a make-up examination.
(b) Any student who obtains permission of the Faculty Board to write a make-up examination must take the examination before the end of third week of the following Semester, thereafter change of grade from incomplete result would be made to reflect his new grade.
(c) A grade of Incomplete (I) shall revert to a Failure (F) by the end of the third week of the following Semester if the student has not applied for or has failed to obtain the permission of the Faculty Board for a make-up examination.

27. Regulations Governing Students’ Continuous Absence from the University
(a) A student, who absents himself from the University for upwards of six weeks in a semester without written official permission, shall normally be deemed to have withdrawn from the University.
(b) A student’s actual attendance at lectures, tutorials, practicals etc. is to be recorded. Any student who fails to attend up to 75% of any of the above shall not normally be allowed to sit for the examination in that course.
(c) Absence from an examination shall normally result in failure of the Course. However, upon a written application, a student who has been absent from an examination with reasonable excuse (supported by a certificate issued by the Director of Health Services, if it is on the grounds of ill-health or proven cases of emergency/accident) may obtain permission of the Faculty Board to write a make-up in the subsequent examination.

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

In addition to the normal services rendered by the University library to the staff and students, there are e-library facilities which enable library users to access books and journals online. The library houses a virtual library equipped with 500 computers. The library opens 24 hours every day during examination. The following are the subscribed databases by the University to facilitate teaching, learning and research.

Virtual Library http://www.nigerianvirtuallibrary.com
User ID: UNILORIN Password: Ilorin

EbscoHost http://search.ebscohost.com
User ID: s5548248 Password: Password

HINARI http://www.who.int/hinari/en/
User ID: NIEO23 Password: 82A406
JSTOR http://www.jstor.org
User ID: unilorin Password: unilorin

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE CONDUCT OF UNIVERSITY EXAMINATIONS
1. GENERAL
Preamble
The University of Ilorin Act, Cap. 455, Laws of the Federation of Nigeria, 2010 (as amended)provides that it shall in particular, be the function of the Senate to make provision for the organisation and control of courses of study at the University, and of the examinations held in relation to those courses, including the appointment of Internal and External Examiners.

Definition of Terms
(a) University Examinations
University Examinations include semester, professional and other examinations involving the participation of the Department, Faculty and the Examinations Office.
(b) Continuous Assessment/Progressive Assessment
The term continuous assessment means course tests, practical works, tutorial and other graded assignments done within the Department/Faculty where the course is being taught.
(c) Semester
A semester is one-half of an academic year as determined by Senate.
(d) Session
A Session consists of two semesters otherwise referred to as an Academic Year as determined by Senate.

(e) Course Credit
One Credit represents 15 hours of lecture/tutorial or 45 hours of practical work per semester.
Two Credits represent 30 hours of lecture/tutorial or 90 hours of practical work per semester.
Three Credits represent 45 hours of lecture/tutorial or 135 hours of practical work per semester and so on.
There are courses that are purely theoretical or practical, while some others are a combination of both.

2. ORGANIZATION OF EXAMINATIONS
A. Internal Examiners
(i) For each course, there shall be a Panel of Examiners, which shall consist of not less than three (3) Internal Examiners. The Head of Department shall be designated the Chief Examiner. A Part-time Lecturer may be appointed an Examiner based on a special case made by the Head of the Department concerned. The Internal Examiners, for all courses in each semester, shall be appointed by Senate on the recommendation of the Head of Department and the Faculty Board concerned.
(ii) The panel shall set and moderate the questions and mark the examination answer scripts. Panel members shall also jointly sign the draft question papers and the examination results before they are submitted to the Examinations Officer.
(iii) Each Faculty shall set up a Board of Examiners consisting of the Dean of the Faculty all the members of the Panel of Examiners in the Faculty and the External Examiners (where applicable). The Dean shall be the Chairman of the Board of Examiners and shall sign the provisional results.
(iv) The Departmental Examination Committee including the external examiner (where applicable) shall consider the results before forwarding same to the Faculty Board of Examiners.
(v) Duties enumerated in (i-iii) above apply also to Computer Based Tests and Examinations

The Departmental Examination Committee, having received and considered reports of the panel of examiners, shall advise Senate through the Faculty Board of Examiners, on the results of the examinations in the Faculty and matters arising there from.

(B) External Examiners
(i) Early in the Harmattan Semester of each Session, Senate shall, on the recommendation of the Faculty Board concerned, appoint at least one External Examiner for courses taken in the final year of a Degree, Diploma or Certificate Programme.
(ii) External Examiners shall be appointed annually and shall not serve for more than two years in the first instance renewable once. At the time of nomination of External Examiners, their titles and/or current academic appointments, degrees, relevant professional qualifications, and/or current University appointment shall be stated.
(iii) An External Examiner shall normally be a Professor or in any case not below the rank of a Senior Lecturer or its equivalent from a recognizedUniversity/Research Institute.
(iii)There shall be at least one External Examiner from outside Nigeria per Faculty.
(iv) The External Examiners shall be paid such remunerations for their services as may be determined from time to time by Senate.
(v) The duties of External Examiners shall be to:
(a) participate in the evaluation of all courses examined in the final year and other levels of a Degree programme as applicable;
(b) satisfy themselves as to the appropriateness of the question papers, having regard to the approved course contents and the level of the examination;
(c) mark, or to revise, where applicable, the marking of scripts of candidates in consultation with the Chief Examiners of the courses;
(d) attend such practical or oral examinations, where applicable, as they may themselves determine in consultation with the Chief Examiners of the courses;
(e) participate in the proceedings of the meeting of the Departmental/Faculty/College Board of Examiners (as appropriate) in the determination of results; and
(f) submit a report to the Vice Chancellor and copy the Dean and Head of Department at the completion of the examination.
C. Duties of Examinations Officer
The Examinations Officer (who shall be based in the Registry) shall:
i. call for lists of External Examiners from the Faculties for the approval of Senate at the beginning of each session;
ii. call for lists of Internal Examiners from the Faculties at the beginning of each semester for the approval of Senate;
iii. write letters of appointment to approved External Examiners and make arrangements for their accommodation and payment of remuneration;
iv. convene as early as possible in the semester, at the instance of Chairman of Time-Table and Room Usage Committee, a meeting of Faculty Sub-Deans and Examinations Coordinatorsfor coordination purposes, such as avoiding time-table and room usage clashes;
v. call for the order of examination materials at the beginning of each semester, acquire sufficient examination materials as required by Faculties and ensure sufficient stock for at least one Semester at any given time;
vi. acquire sufficient examination materials as required by Faculties and ensure sufficient stock for at least one semester at any given time;
vii. inform the Director of Health Services of the dates of examinations and request him to arrange for at least one University Medical Officer to be on call, for the purpose of attending to candidates for the whole period of the examinations;
viii. monitor the conduct of Entrance/Qualifying examinations for admission into relevant Certificate and Diploma Programmes;
ix. attend each Faculty Board of Examiner’s meeting to ascertain correctness of marks and application of University Regulations governing the Degree/Certificate/Diploma classification;
x. transmit the recommendations of the Faculty Board of Examiners on the results and matters arising therefrom to Senate for consideration
xi. issue comprehensive transcripts on behalf of the University to students and graduates of this University;
xii. make available to students and Chief Invigilators/Invigilators appropriate portions of the examination regulations through the Faculty Officer before each semester examinations;
xiii. request for, and publish the name of students who, even though duly registered for certain courses, are not eligible to take the examinations in those courses (see section on Eligibility);
xiv. Oversee the general conduct of all examinations;
xv. Inform the Director of Security of the dates and venues of examinations and request him to arrange for adequate security.

D. Sub-Dean/Faculty Examinations Coordinator
Each Faculty shall have a Faculty Examination coordinator, who shall be elected/appointed by the Faculty, provided such elected or appointed Officer shall not be below the rank of a Senior Lecturer.
Duties
The Faculty Sub-Dean, in conjunction with the Faculty Officer, shall;
i. be responsible for the proper conduct of examinations taken in the Faculty;
ii. request Heads of Departments to submit, on prescribed forms, information on the examinations, including the list of courses to be examined during the semester for the purpose of preparing the examination time-table;
iii. request examination materials from the Examination Officer as soon as possible and take delivery of them at least two weeks before the commencement of the examinations;
iv. liaise with other Faculty Sub-Deans within the Time-Table & Room Usage Committee where necessary, for the purpose of co-ordination, such as avoiding examination time-table clashes for courses that cut across Faculties and making arrangements for examination venues;
v. prepare the time-table for examinations to be held in the Faculty. The Final Time-table shall be published on Notice Boards and the University/Faculty website for students’ information, at least three weeks before the commencement of the examinations. Where any alterations are made, affected students must be duly informed latest three (3) working days before the examination is held;
vi. obtain a list of academic staff from Heads of Departments, and prepare invigilation Schedule for the examinations in the Faculty and circulate it at least two weeks before the commencement of the examinations;
vii. mobilize Faculty and Departmental non-academic staff to assist in the day- to-day conduct of examinations in the Faculty;
viii. receive answer scripts from Chief invigilators and ensure that examiners sign for the answer scripts on collection.

E. Duties of Chief Examiner
The Head of Department, who shall normally be the Chief Examiner for all the courses to be examined in the Department, shall:
i. be the Chairman of the Departmental Panel of Examiners to consider results of all examinations conducted by the Department before they are forwarded to the Faculty Board of Examiners.
ii. be responsible for the production of question papers for courses to be examined in his Department in accordance with the regulations. Questions of all final year examinations in Degree Programmes shall be moderated by the External Examiners before Examinations can be conducted. At the end of each examination, the Chief Examiner shall deposit, with the Departmental Examinations Officer the moderated question papers.
iii. ensure that drafts are written legibly on the prescribed forms supplied by the Examinations Officer. The draft must contain all the necessary information and must be signed by at least one of the Internal Examiners concerned and the Chief Examiner;
iv. seal securely and keep custody of question papers until they are required.
v. Oversee the computation and loading of Final Year Results, prepare and publish the results of all courses, taught by the department for presentation to the Faculty Board of Examiners; and
vi. submit to the University Librarian three copies of each examination question paper at the end of each semester examinations (where applicable)

F. Question Papers
i) All examiners shall strictly preserve the secrecy of question papers at all stages until the examination comes to an end.
ii) All courses shall normally be examined at the end of the semester in which they are offered except in the Faculty of Clinical Sciences.
iii) The duration of written examinations shall range from a minimum of one hour to a maximum of three hours with the exception of practical courses.
iv) The security of examination question papers shall be the joint responsibility of the Internal Examiners, Chief Examiner and the Faculty Sub-Dean.

G. Eligibility
i) All students who are duly registered for courses in a given semester are eligible to sit for examinations in those courses except students in the following categories:
a) a student who absents himself from the University for upward of six weeks in any semester without official permission. Such a student shall normally be deemed to have voluntarily withdrawn from the University;
b) a student who fails to attend up to 75% practical/lecture hours; and
c) a student on suspension for one reason or another.
The Examinations Officer shall request from Heads of Departments the names of students who are not eligible under the above regulations and the titles and code numbers of the courses concerned. The information must be received by the Examinations Officer for the semester and must be published by him to the students within one week of receipt.
H. Examination Time-Table
i) Examination time-table shall be prepared by the Faculty Sub-Deans in liaison with the Examinations Officer within the Time-Table & Room Usage Committee
ii) All Faculty Examinations Officers shall meet to prepare a workable Time table within the Time-Table & Room Usage Committee.
iii) As far as possible, examinations for the same Faculty shall be scheduled for the same hall.
iv) As far as possible, not too many courses shall be scheduled, to hold simultaneously in one hall.
v) As far as possible, a student shall not normally be required to sit for more than two examinations on the same day.

I. Examination Accommodation
i. All University Examinations shall be held in halls, rooms or laboratories approved by the University.
ii. All Faculty Examinations Officers/Sub-Deans shall meet to arrange the usage of available halls, lecture rooms and laboratories/lecture theatres among the Faculties.
iii. Sitting arrangement should be made in such a way to make possible for the invigilators to reach candidates with ease.
iv. A large clock or clocks from which time for the examination shall be determined shall be prominently displayed before and visible to all candidates.
J. Instructions to Students
i. Students shall always ensure that they acquaint themselves with the examination regulations and instructions;
ii. Students shall attend the examinations punctually. Admittance into the examination hall more than half an hour after the examination has started shall only be at the discretion of the Chief Invigilator.
iii. Students shall bring with them to the examination hall their own ink, pen, ruler, erasers and pencils and any other materials which are permitted by these regulations (as stated here under). Accordingly, students are warned in their own interest to ensure that lecture notes, text-books, jotters, bags, handsets and other prohibited items are not brought anywhere close to the examination venue.
iv. Students must sign the attendance register at the beginning of each paper.
v. Having signed the attendance register, no student shall leave the examination hall without submitting his answer script.
vi. No student shall leave the examination hall for whatever reason without informing the invigilator
vii. While the examination is in progress, communication of any kind between students shall strictly be prohibited and any student found to be giving or receiving irregular assistance commits a misconduct, which shall attract appropriate sanction.
viii. Silence shall be observed in the examination hall. The only permissible way of attracting the attention of the Invigilator is by a show of the hand.
ix. Smoking in and around the examination hall is strictly prohibited.
x. The use of scrap paper is prohibited. All rough work shall be done in the answer booklet and crossed neatly through. Supplementary answer sheets which shall not be supplied until at least half-an-hour after the commencement of the examination shall be stapled to the main answer booklet.
xi. Students taking Mathematics or Engineering Drawing and similar courses shall bring their own mathematical or drawing instruments, which should include compass and dividers, protractors, diagonal scales and set squares. Personal copies of Mathematical Tables may be allowed in the examination hall provided there are no inscriptions on them.
xii. Before submitting their scripts at the end of the examination, students shall satisfy themselves that they have inserted at the appropriate places their matriculation numbers and the numbers of the questions answered. Except for the question paper and any other materials they may have legitimately brought with them (as indicated in rules (iii) and (viii) above), students shall not be allowed to remove or mutilate any paper or materials supplied by the University.
xiii. Students shall use their matriculation numbers for all examinations.
xiv. Students shall not be allowed to submit their answer scripts in the first thirty minutes and last fifteen minutes of any examination.
xv. Students shall remain seated while Invigilators organize the collection of answer scripts.
xvi. Students must sign out on the attendance sheet at the submission of their answer scripts.
xvii. Students intending to use calculators in any University Examination should comply with the following regulations:
a. electronic calculators only as specified by their respective Department;
b. such calculators must be small (hand-held) and battery/solar-operated;
c. should not borrow another student’s calculator as this practice shall be construed as giving or receiving
irregular assistance during the examination;
d. instruction manuals including calculator packets and containers are prohibited in the examination hall as these often contain useful mathematical formulae and methods;
e. Only one calculator per student is allowed in the examination hall;
f. Students shall make available for inspection by invigilators, their calculators on entry into the examination hall and any time during the examination.
A contravention of any of these regulations will be treated in the same way as cheating in an examination.
K. Examination Offences and Penalties
1. Code of Conduct
Students shall:
i. use or consult during an examination only such books, papers, instruments or other materials or aids as are specifically permitted or provided by the Department in which the examination is being held;
ii. not introduce or attempt to introduce into examination venue hand bags, books, notes, instruments (handsets, i-pad/i-pod, flash drives and any other storage device) or other materials or aids that are not permitted;
iii. not enter any examination venue with any inscription on any part of the dress or body e.g. palm, arm, thigh, etc. if such inscriptions bear any relevance to the examination;
iv. not pass or attempt to pass any information from one person to another during an examination;
v. neither act in collusion with any other candidate(s) or person(s) nor copy nor attempt to copy from another candidate, nor engage in any similar activity;
vi. not disturb or distract any other candidate(s) during the examination;
vii. only use their matriculation numbers for examination, (no names should be written);
viii. not be allowed to leave an examination venue until after 75% of the time allocated for that particular paper has expired;
ix. not write any University examination on behalf of others, nor other people write any university examination for them; and
x. ensure that he submit the answer script and any extra sheet to the invigilator before leaving the examination hall.
Failure to observe any of the rules (i) to (x) above, shall prima facie constitute examination misconduct.
2. Procedure for investigating Alleged Examination Misconduct
(a) At the discretion of the Chief Invigilator, a student may be required to leave the examination venue when his conduct is adjudged to be disturbing or likely to disturb the examination. The Chief Invigilator shall report immediately any such action taken to the Dean, through the Faculty Examination Coordinator (Sub-Dean), after the completion of the examination by the other students.
(b) Any student suspected of any examination irregularity shall be required to sign and submit to the Chief Invigilator a written statement in the Examination Hall. Failure to make a written statement shall be regarded as an admission of the charge against such a student. In any case, the students shall be allowed to finish his examination;
(c) The Dean shall, within 48 hours of receipt of a report, send it to the Faculty Examination Malpractice Committee comprising not less than three academic staff to investigate the charge(s) and make available a report along with their records of proceedings and all other exhibits within four (4) weeks through the Deputy Registrar (Academic Support Services) to the Registrar who shall forward same to the Students’ Disciplinary Committee; and
(d) The Students’ Disciplinary Committee shall within six weeks of receiving such a report, investigate and recommend the penalty in cases of proven misconduct to the Vice-Chancellor in accordance with section 17 of the University Act.

3. Penalties
(i) Any candidate found cheating or aiding and abetting cheating in any examination shall be expelled from the University;
(ii) In a situation where an individual, not registered for a particular course writes an examination on behalf of a student, he shall be handed over to the Law Enforcement Agents, if he is from outside the University, while the student so helped shall be expelled from the University. Where the individual is a student or staff, he and the student so helped shall be expelled or dismissed from the University (as the case may be)
(iii) In a situation where a student sits for an examination in a course not registered for, no score shall be recorded for such a student.

4. Examination Leakage
Where the Dean has reason to believe that the nature of any question or the content of any question paper may have become known before the date and time of the examination to any person(s) other than the Examiners and any Official of the University authorized to handle the question paper, he may order the suspension of the examination or the cancellation of the question paper or the setting of a new paper. He shall then investigate the leakage and report the matter to Senate through the Vice-Chancellor.

L. Absence from Examinations
(i) Students shall present themselves at such University Examinations for which they have registered under these Regulations. Students who fail to do so, for reasons other than proven ill-health, accident or any proven emergencies shall be deemed to have failed that examination. Mis-reading/ignorance of the Time-Table and such other excuses shall not be accepted as a satisfactory explanation for absence.
(ii) A student who falls ill during an examination period should report in writing to the Dean of his Faculty through his Head of Department.
(iii) A student who is absent from an examination on account of ill-health confirmed by medical report from the Director of University Health Services may be given a make-up examination in the course(s) missed, based on guidelines approved by Senate. Otherwise, he shall take the regular examination on the following occasion as his make-up.
(iv) Approval for make-up examination shall be by the Faculty Board, provided:
(a) the ill-health has been reported to the Dean through the Head of Department; and
(b) the student has obtained a written report from the Director of Health Services or his designate which either is dated prior to the end of the examination, or provides evidence that the student was hospitalized during the examination.
(v) Application for make-up examinations shall normally be made immediately at the end of the semester examinations.
(vi) make-up examination shall normally be concluded within the first five (5)
(vii) weeks of the semester following the application for the make-up. 
THE GUIDELINES ON SUSPENSION OF STUDIES BY STUDENTS
a. student can be allowed to suspend his study for a semester or session;
b. application for suspension of study shall normally be made before the commencement of the semester or session for which approval is sought.
c. a student wishing to suspend his study shall obtain the designated application form for Suspension of Study from the University Portal;
d. Such application for suspension of studies shall be processed through the Faculty Board for Senate approval
e. following Senates approval of the Faculty Board’s recommendation, the Registrar shall communicate the decision to the candidate;
f. no student can have his study suspended for more than one session at a time. However, upon expiration of the first session the student can re-apply on proven conditions e.g. national assignment; and
g. Upon the expiration of the period for which the study has been suspended, the candidate shall be required to obtain and fill the appropriate Reactivation of Study Form from the Academic Office.

SENATE DECISIONS ON IMPROVEMENT OF THE CONDUCT OF EXAMINATIONS IN THE UNIVERSITY

A. Short-Term Measures
(i) Investigation of and Penalties for Examination Misconduct
a. Any student established to be in possession of incriminating materials at the examination or involved in any other examination malpractice before, during or after an examination, including impersonation, shall be expelled from the University.
b. The procedure of investigation shall be reviewed to ensure prompt treatment of all cases of examination malpractice to avoid delay in disposing reported cases. In this connection, each Faculty shall properly set up a Standing Committee to investigate reported cases of examination misconduct immediately after each Semester Examination such that all reports are received by the Registrar four weeks after examination.
c. The Students’ Disciplinary Committee shall treat prima facie cases within six weeks of receipt of reports from Faculties.
d. All students suspected to be in any examination misconduct during any semester examination shall be required, in writing, to remain on campus after the semester examination to facilitate the process of investigation.

(ii) Handling of Answer Booklets:
(a) Every Faculty must ensure that all answer sheets for examinations carry the Faculty stamp and date of the examination. Any extra sheets given out must also be stamped as well. All Faculties must ensure that all answer scripts must carry the Faculty names.
(b) Answer booklets shall be treated as security materials and shall be numbered serially, while it shall be an offence for anyone whether staff or students to put it to other use than it is meant for.
(c) Invigilators must ensure that students write their matriculation numbers clearly on the answer booklets immediately before the commencement of the examinations to prevent swapping of booklets during and after the examination.
(d) All answer sheets for examination are those produced for the Faculty and bears the Faculty’s name.

(iii) Examination Invigilation
(a) Course Lecturer shall not normally be made to invigilate the examinations of their courses;
(b) Invigilators must properly check-in students to the examination hall and be satisfied that no student brings prohibited materials into the examination hall/room;
(c) Chief Invigilators must report through the Faculty Sub-Dean all cases of examination misconduct to the Dean within forty-eight (48) hours;
(d) There shall be at least two Invigilators per hall/room and at no time should they both leave the hall or room at the same time.
(e) Erring Invigilators shall be administratively dealt with.

(iii) Other Precautions:
(a) After all students have been seated in the examination hall and question papers distributed, no student shall be allowed to leave the examination hall without being accompanied by a staff member;
(b) No student shall be allowed to leave the examination hall within the first thirty minutes of the examination or fifteen minutes to the end of the examination;
(c) Students shall be required to place on the table, their Faculty examination card and University Identity Card for Invigilators’ inspection at any time during the examination;
(d) Sitting arrangement in the examination hall shall be at the discretion of the invigilators who shall engage means of breaking up organized sitting arrangements; and
(e) The services of University Security Personnel shall be enlisted during the period of examinations to prevent unauthorized visitors from roaming about the examination halls/venues.

B. Long Term Measures:
i) Provision of adequate accommodation and furniture for examination will be looked into;
ii) Efforts will be made to provide adequate number of equipment and specimen to discourage sharing:
iii). Each course Lecturer shall be provided information as to the number of students who have registered for course(s) assigned to him or her. This measure will allow the Lecturer to have the correct number of students who registered for a course and are expected to write examination in the course. It will also prevent students who are not properly registered for the course or fake students from sitting examination in the course. Also, regular attendance at lectures shall be closely monitored in order to encourage regular class attendance.
iv) Where it is needed, Senior Non-academic staff could be considered for examination invigilation with appropriate remuneration.

C. Procedure for Result Verification
(a) The student completes online “Result Verification Form” available on the University website.
(b) The student submits the form to his Head of Department for onward transmission to the Deputy Registrar (Academic Support Services)
(c) The HOD, within one week, shall issue to the student, the verified result either confirming the old score or reflecting the new one. A copy shall also be forwarded to the Deputy Registrar (Academic Support Services).
(d) Where a review occurs, the HOD is under obligation to give reasons and forward a copy of the Verification Report through the Dean to the :Director of Academic Planning and Deputy Registrar (Academic Support Services)
(e) In case the student is still not satisfied with the result, he shall obtain a Re-mark Request Form from the Deputy Registrar (Academic Support Services). The Form shall be filled and submitted to the same office.
(f) The Deputy Registrar (Academic Support Services) shall request for the Marking Scheme of the Course from the HOD concerned and forward it, together with all the scripts of the Course and the Student’s “Script Re-mark Request Form,” to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic).
(g) The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) shall pick at random, scripts including that of the complainant, and oversee the process of re-marking.
(h)The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) shall submit a report to the Vice-Chancellor not later than four weeks from the submission of the “Scripts Re-mark Request Form”.
(i) The Vice-Chancellor, and the under-listed shall meet to consider the final report on the remark and forward same to Senate:
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic),
Dean of the concerned Faculty,
Director of Academic Planning,
Chairman, Committee of Provost and Deans,
Dean, Student Affairs;
Head of Department concerned;
Deputy Registrar (Academic Support Services)

(j) Where an examiner is found to have wilfully and deliberately victimized a student, the matter shall be referred to the Staff Disciplinary and Appeals Committee, otherwise the original result shall be upheld.

UNIVERSITY OF ILORIN, ILORIN, NIGERIA
ACADEMIC OFFICE
i. Name of Student:………………………………
ii. Faculty …………………………………………
iii. Department:……………………………………
iv. Programme………………………………………..
v. Level:………………………………………………
vi. Matric No:………………………………………..
vii. Session:…………………………………………….
viii. Semester:………………………………….……..

RE-MARK REQUEST FORM
Date of Examination …………………………………..
(Visit www.unilorin.edu.ng/Portal)
Student’s Phone No:……………………………………
Student’s e-mail Address:………………………………..
Complaint:………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Pledge: That a sum of N50, 000 shall be paid for this form, refundable only if the student’s claim is not found to be frivolous.
Course Code/Title:……………………………………..
Student’s Signature & Date……………………………

DEPARTMENT OF ARABIC
HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT
Arabic was one of the foundation programmes introduced by this University since its inception. The Curriculum and other preliminary work on this were carried out by the then Dr. I. A. Ogunbiyi who was appointed Senior lecturer in 1975. From the beginning of 1976 and 1977, the Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies took off with the then Dr. I. A. B. Balogun as its foundation head. During the 1977-78 session, both programmes of Arabic and Islamic Studies were joined by Christian Studies and Comparative Religions Studies to form a new Department of Religions. In spite of the affinity of Arabic with Islamic Studies, the fact that Arabic distinguishes itself as essentially of language and literature makes students, lecturers and visiting experts in the field and other observers to note the aberration in its location in the Department of Religions. Senate in its wisdom approved the recommendation of the Faculty Board of Arts and the Business Committee of Senate to grant a separate department to the programme. Council also upheld the approval of Senate on this matter and approved a takeoff grant of N500, 000. The effective date of its attaining the status of a distinct Department was 1st of August, 2004. The programme has produced graduates of Arabic and through it, many Masters and Ph.D. holders have been trained. One of the products of Arabic who is the first to have made a First Class is in 1981 the immediate past Vice-Chancellor of the University and currently the Registrar of the Joint Admission and Matriculation Board (JAMB), Prof. Is-haq Olarewaju Oloyede. The Department has since produced three other First Class Graduates with following students: Mubaraki, Saheed Balogun, 2014, Yusuf, Abeebullahi Adewale 2016, Otun, Afeez Akanni 2018. There are particular characteristics, which distinguish Arabic from the other Arts disciplines because it is a language, which has been studied and developed by Nigerians for eight centuries before their study of other foreign languages. Its subject matter continues to elicit the interest of millions of Nigerians who study it without depending on government support. The legacy of skill, quality and accomplishment left behind by such prolific Nigerian writers in Arabic serve as a source material for historians and other cognate disciplines in the Arts and Social Sciences. It also serves as a stimulus for students wishing to learn it as an academic discipline in the university as a continuum to what happens outside the Universities cumulatively and iteratively in addition to those who study it out of sheer interest in a foreign language. It also provided diagnostic categories at different layers of language to enrich applied linguistics. This reciprocal relationship of Arabic with other disciplines is bound to positively influence the students of the subject. The language has influenced many Nigerian languages through convergence of lexical items through borrowing.
PHILOSOPHY
The philosophy of the Departments includes:
1. Enabling the students to acquire spoken and written competence in the Arabic Language
2. Acquainting students with the socio-cultural, commercial, political and diplomatic aspects of the life of the speakers of the language, with a view to promoting international understanding.
3. Equipping students with the adequate training for jobs in the fields of teaching, research, translation and interpretation, administration, journalism and diplomatic services.
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES
(1) Students should be able to acquire important abilities required in the spoken and written Arabic. Students should be able to develop qualities of mind through a full awareness of the socio-cultural, commercial, political, diplomatic, economic as well as military aspects of the life of the speakers of Arabic which is the most widely spoken mother tongue in Africa in addition to its heartlands in the Middle East.
(2) Students should be able to appreciate the contributions of Nigerian authors to Arabic scholarship, to show ability to understand the thoughts and language skills of those scholars in the context of the past and in juxtaposition with the present, which sheds light on the dynamics of change and the reality of continuity in spite of change.
(3) Students should be able to read and digest all texts critically and emphatically as they pay due attention to form and content, genre and style as well as perspective and purpose. They should be able to imbibe the personal attitudes of being critical and yet tolerant.
(4) Students should be able to acquire basic critical skills such as:
(a) recognition of distinction between antithesis and synthesis on one hand and balancing on the other; that statements are not all of equal validity, that there are ways of testing them; that what a word must mean in a context is more critical to knowledge than what it may mean.
(b) Students should be able to demonstrate their mastery of the language through a clear, coherent and appropriate choice of diction with a sense of economy of expression both in their oral and written work. Their exposure to grammar and rhetoric will inculcate in them qualities of systematic thought and to be good in logic.
Such skills and abilities listed above will equip students with adequate training relevant to job opportunities such as teaching, research, translating, administration, journalism, military and diplomatic assignments and for self-employment as a consultant.
TITLE OF THE DEGREE(S)
B. A. Arabic
FORMER HEADS OF THE DEPARTMENT
Dr. H. I. Olagunju 1st August, 2004 – 31st July, 2005
Dr. Najimdeen Ishola Raji 1st August, 2005 – 31st July, 2006
Prof. Isa Alabi Abubakar 1st August, 2006 – 31st July, 2008
Prof. Zakariyau Idress-Oboh Oseni 1st August, 2008 – 31st July, 2009
Dr. Najimdeen Ishola Raji 1st August, 2009 – 31st July, 2010
Dr. Abdulsalam Muhammad Usman 1st August, 2010 – 31st July, 2012
Dr. Najimdeen Ishola Raji 1st August, 2012 – 31st July, 2013
Prof. Zakariyau Idress-Oboh Oseni 1st August, 2013 – 31st July, 2014
Prof. Abdulqaniy Abimbola Abdussalam 1st August, 2014 – 31st July, 2016
Prof. Isa Alabi Abubakar 1st August, 2016 – 23rd Oct, 2016
Dr. Lateef Onireti Ibraheem 24th Oct, 2016 -22nd Oct, 2018
Dr K. M. U. Gbodofu 23th Oct, 2018-22nd Oct, 2020
Dr Yaqub Alhaji Abdullahi 23th Oct, 2020- Till Date

LIST OF ACADEMIC STAFF IN THE DEPARTMENT 2020/2021
S/N NAME RANK & STATUS QUALIFICATION AREA OF SPECIALIZATION DESIGNATION & OTHER RESPONSIBILITIES
01 Yaqub Alhaji Abdullahi Senior Lecturer B. A. (BUK,) M. A. Ph.D. (Ilorin), PGDE, (Sokoto) Arabic, Islamic Literature and Rhetoric Ag. HOD
02 Isa Alabi Abubakar Professor B. A. (Ilorin), M. A. (BUK), PGDE, TAFL (Riyadh), Ph.D. (Ilorin) Arabic Literature, Creative Writing (Poetry) and Rhetoric Chairman: Publication/ Editorial Board Committee
03 Abdulganiy Abimbola Abdussalam Professor
B. Ed, (Khartoum), M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) Arabic Language/Linguistics/Culture and Applied Linguistics Post Graduate departmental Coordinator
04 Abdulbaqi Shuaib Agaka Professor
B.A., (Libya), M.A., (Kano), Ph.D. (Sokoto) Arabic Rhetoric Sabbatical
05 Lateef Onireti Ibraheem Reader B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin), PGD, TAFL (Riyadh), Arabic/Islamic Literature and Applied Linguistics. On Sabbatical 2020/2021 Academic session
06 Khalil Mohammad Usman Gbodofu Senior Lecturer B. A. (BUK), M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) PGED (Sokoto) Arabic Literary Criticism in Nigeria. Chairman: Quality Assurance Committee
07 Atef. Ismail. Ahmad Ibrahim Muheisin Senior Lecturer B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Cairo) Arabic Language and Applied Linguistics
08 Uthman Idrees Kankawi Senior Lecturer B. A. (UDUS), M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) Arabic Literature Chairman ICT/Web Committee
09 Hassanat Fumilayo Abubakar-Hamid Senior Lecturer
B. A. M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) PGED (Sokoto) Arabic Literature & Feminism Departmental Screening & clearance officer
10 Abdulwahid Aliy Adebisi Senior Lecturer _ B. A. Ed, (UNAD), M. A., (Ilorin), Ph.D.(KSU) PGDJ, Arabic Language, Translation Studies and Sociolinguistics Coordinator: Sandwich programme
11 Abdur-Rasheed Mahmoud-Mukadam Lecturer Senior B. A., (Al-Azhar), M. A., Ph.D., PGDE (Ilorin) Arabic Language, Arabic Manuscripts and Editing
Secretary, Alimi journal of Arabic
12 Ahmad Dame Diop Lecturer I B. A., (Niger), M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) Arabic Literature and Rhetoric Chairman:
Welfare committee
13 Husain Muhammad-Bashir Musa Lecturer I
B. A. (Cairo), M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) Stylistics & Rhetoric
14 Azeez Lateef Adekilekun Lecturer II
B. A., (KSU), M. A. Ph.D. (Ilorin Arabic Literary Criticism Level Adviser
15 Mahmud Dajuma Musa Lecturer II
B. A., (Al-Hikmah), M. A. Ph.D. (Ilorin Arabic Language & Linguistics Level Adviser
16 Abdulsalam Babatunde Ambali Lecturer II
B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) Arabic Literature & Applied Linguistics Level Adviser
17 Abdulhakeem Zubair Lecturer II
B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) Comparative African Literature and Translation Examinations Officer
18 Imam Akeyede Muritala Lecturer II
B. A., (Niamey), M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) Arabic and Islamic Literature. Academic Staff Secretary
19 Jamiu Saadullah Abdulkareem Lecturer II
B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) PGDE (KWCOED) Arabic Literature, Criticism and Culture in Nigeria. Level Adviser
20 Abubakar Abdullah Salaty Lecturer II
B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) PGDE (NOUN) Arabic Language Applied Linguistics and Stylistics.

NON ACADEMIC STAFF
S/N
01 Afusat Nike Yahaya Chief Secretarial Assistant First School Leaving Cert./SSCE/Computer Processing /50wpm
02 Mr. Muhammed Junaid Sa’ad High Executive Officer National Diploma
03 Lateefat Arinola Uthman Senior Computer Operator (Arabic I) First School Leaving Cert./SSCE/ Computer Processing
04 Oluwatoyin Rahman Caretaker First Leaving Certificate

Level Advisers
Dr. A. B. Abdulsalam 100 Level
Dr. J. S. Abdulkareem 200 Level
Dr. M. D. Musa 300 Level
Dr. A. L. Adekilekun 400 Level

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
4 - Years (8 – Semester) Degree Programme
(i) Credit passes in five (5) subjects including Arabic at the Senior Secondary School Certificate of WAEC, NECO, NABTEB, NBAIS or their equivalent for a four year or eight Semester programme then they are required to obtain an acceptable score in the University Matriculation Examination (UME).
(ii) 3 Year (Six Semester) Degree Programme
Candidates with recognized diploma or NCE or their equivalents in Arabic language are eligible for admission into a three year or six semester degree course in Arabic after passing Candidates who do not possess a credit in the Arabic language may be admitted into a five (5) year degree programme, the first of which should be a one year preparatory course.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS U M E SUBJECTS SPECIAL CONSIDERATION (WAIVER) REMARKS
DIRECT ENTRY U. M. E.
Arabic 1. At least two ‘A’ Level passes to include Arabic and any other Arts/Social Science Subject.

2. Passes in two teaching subjects, including Arabic in the NCE. Five ‘O’ Level/ Senior Arabic and Islamic Studies Certificate (SAISC) credit passes to include English Language, Arabic and three other Arts/Social Science Subjects. Arabic and any other two Arts/Social Subjects 1. UNILORIN
Accept relevant Diploma of Unilorin & Bayero University, Kano (this satisfies both A/L and O/L admission requirements by Direct Entry)

2. Candidates who did not offer Arabic at U. M. E. but meet U. M. E. entry requirements may be considered into 100 level.

U.M.E.
UNILORIN
May accept candidates with
no Arabic but who meets
other entry requirements
e.g. Islamic Studies

COURSE DESCRIPTION

State of a Course
A course shall be classified as “Compulsory”, “Required” or “Elective” in a given degree programme of the University.

Compulsory Courses:
These are within the student’s discipline which be taken and passed. Marks scored will count toward graduation and student cannot graduate without passing them.

Requirement
These are courses outside the student’s discipline, i.e. a subsidiary course that must be taken and passed.

Elective Courses
These are courses within and/ or outside a student’s discipline from which a student may select a number for the purpose of fulfilling the requirements for the award of the Degree. However, in order to graduate, a student must pass enough elective courses to meet the minimum number of Credits required for the award of the degree.

Courses Requirement
Each student shall satisfy the specific requirement of his Degree Programme as contained in the Faculty entries.

B. A. ARABIC PGROGRAMME

ARA 121 Intermediate Arabic Grammar 3 Credits
Grammar of the Arabic language involving inflection and factors governing them, asma’ ‘afcal, and huruf. 45h (T); C
ARA 122 Arabic Composition I 2 Credits
Essay writing in Arabic with emphasis on style.At least 20 topics to be treated in both oral and written forms. 30h (T); E
ARA 123 Arabic Reading and Comprehension 2 Credits
Study of classical and modern text stories of at least 20 prose and poetry extracts. 30h (T), 45h (P); E
ARA 124 Translation from and into Arabic I 3 Credits
Translation of at least 20 prose and 10 poetry passages on diverse topics of classical and modern Arabic into English from Arabic and vice-versa. 45h (T); E
ARA 125 Introduction to Arabic Literature 3 Credits
Basic concept of literature with emphasis on the basic components (such as imagery and music), literary creation and literary appreciation. Relevant Arabic text will be used for illustration. The course will also dwell on the division of Arabic literature into different literary period, as well as the outstanding characteristics of the literary figures in each period. Relevant text will be used for illustration. 30h (T); C
ARA 126 Arabic Morphology I 2 Credits
Introduction to Arabic morphology as the basis of understanding the vocabulary items in the language. Emphasis on al-ficlu l-mujarradwal- mazid, at-tasghir and kitabatu ‘l-hamzah. 30h (T); E

ARA 127 Introduction to Islamic Literature (al-Adabul-Islami) 2 credits
Historic development of Islamic literature, its theories, characteristics and features. Critical issues on al-AdabilIslami. Selected poetry and prose works to be reviewed for practical purpose. 30h (T) C
ARA 128 Language Drills 2 credits
Consolidation of various aspects of verbs, nouns and particles with emphasis on objets(maf’ulat) verbal and nominal sentences. Extensive reading as well as comprehension exercises. 15h (T) 45h (P), C
ARA 129 Arabic Reading Skills 2Credits
Exposing Students to reading, note-taking, note-making, summarizing and using the library, as well as the dictionary.Intensive exercise will be given for illustration and testing the level of comprehension. 30 (T), C
ARA 130 Introduction to Arabic Composition I
A study of the principles, rudiments, theories and types of Arabic Composition. This includes oral and written aspects of the composition in simple short Arabic sentences on common topics and events, such as school activities, life in the village, a football match, public holidays, importance of computer, at auto mobile teller machine spot, university auditorium, writing of curriculum vitae, etc. 30h (T), C
ARA 132 Translation Drills 2 credits
Translation of at least 10 prose of about 200 words each and 5 poetry passages into English from Arabic and vice-versa. Passages to be on diverse topics covering both classical and modern Arabic. 30h (T) C.
ARA 134 Introduction to Morphology 2 credits
Introduction to Arabic Morphology as the basis of understanding the vocabulary items in the language, a study of basic Arabic Morphology, treating the structural formations and composition of words. Emphasis will be placed on the morphological forms, the source and derived forms and the defective verbs. The course will also involve the study of morphology of nouns. 30h (T) C.
ARA 141 Beginners’ Arabic Conversation I 2 Credits
Basic vocabulary of the Arabic language.Simple sentence formation and narration of very short stories in Arabic.(For Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents). 15h (T), 45h (P); E
ARA 142 Beginners’ Arabic Conversation II 1 Credit
More basic vocabulary of the Arabic language.Dialogues and discussions in Arabic. More short stories with emphasis on basic Arabic. (For Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents). 45h (P); E
ARA 143 Beginners’ Arabic Reading I 2 Credits
Arabic alphabet.Words and sentence constructions. Reading and writing of fully vocalized short passages. (For Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents). 15h (T), 45h (P); E
ARA 144 Beginners’ Arabic Reading II 2 Credits
Reading and writing of fully vocalized long passages. Short stories and essays in Arabic.(For Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents). 15h (T), 45h (P); E

ARA 145 Beginners’ Arabic Grammar 2 Credits
Essential grammatical features of standard Arabic.Types of nouns, verbs, pronouns and particles with examples.(For Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents). 45h (T); E
ARA 222 Arabic Reading 3 Credits
Reading and comprehension of at least 20 long sparsely vocalized Arabic passages. Emphasis on classical and modern literary texts. 45h (T); E
ARA 223 Arabic Composition II 2 Credits
Oral and written presentations in standard Arabic. 30h (T); C
ARA 224 Translation from and into Arabic II 2 Credits
Translation of prose and poetry passages from Arabic to English and vice-versa. 30h (T); E
ARA 225 Pre-Islamic Arabic Literature 2 Credits
Study of the Pre-Islamic (jahili) literature.Historical background of Ashabu‘l-Muallaqatorators of the era. Study of the representative texts of the literary figures of the period. 30h (T); C
ARA 226 Arabic Literature of the Early Islamic and Umayyad Periods 2 Credits
Literary works of the two periods. Selected prose, especially Khutab (public speeches) and poetry of the periods. Style of the Qur’an and the Hadith literature. 30h (T); C
ARA 227 The Art of Speech-Making in Arabic 2 Credits
Techniques and theories of speech-making in Arabic.Practical demonstration by students. 15h (T), 45h (P); C

ARA 228 Arabic Syntax I 2 Credits
Major aspects of Arabic syntax: sentences, aspects of verbs, nouns and particles. 30h (T); C
ARA 229 Arabic Morphology II 2 Credits
Key aspects of Arabic morphology: verb, derivatives (al-mushtaqqat), types of mu’annath (the feminine) and al-muthanna (the dual). 30h (T); C
ARA 230 Contemporary Arabic Prose 2 credits
Textual study of modern terminologies and expressions used in literary journals and daily press emphasis on the Arabic press sourced from internet. 30h (T) C
ARA 232 Reading Skills ll 2 credits
Reading and comprehension of at least 20 long sparely vocalized Arabic passages. Emphasis on classical and modern literary texts. 30h (T) 45h C
ARA 234 Introduction to Translation Study 2 credits
Fundamental principles of Translation, study of various theories of Translation from and into Languages with particular reference to Arabic and English Translation procedure: literal, borrowing, calque, transposition, modulation equivalence, adaptation, copious illustration of each 30h (T) C.
ARA 241 Intermediate Arabic Reading I 2 Credits
Reading and comprehension of fully vocalized Arabic passages. Translation of selected passages into English.(For Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents). 30h (T), 45h (P); E
ARA 242 Intermediate Arabic Reading II 2 Credits
Further reading and comprehension of vocalized Arabic passages of not less than 200 words. Translation of selected passages into English.(For Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents). 30h (T), 45h (P); E

ARA 243 An-Nahw 2 Credits
Principal units of Arabic grammar: al-ism (noun), al-fil (verb) and al-harf (particles) (For Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents) 30h (T), 45h (P); E
ARA 251 General Survey of Arabic Literature 2 Credits
Historical development of Arabic literature from the Pre-Islamic to the Abbasid periods. Textual samples to be taught in their Arabic original and English translation (For Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents).30h (T); E
ARA 261 Arabic for Textual Reading I 3 Credits
Reading and writing of Arabic letters, words, sentences and short passages taken from classical Arabic texts.(For Direct Entry Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents). 30h (T), 45 h (P); E
ARA 262 Arabic for Textual Reading II 2 Credits
More reading and writing of Arabic texts with emphasis on comprehension. (For Direct Entry Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents) 15h (T), 45h (P); E
ARA 263 Arabic Structures 3 Credits
Introduction to basic grammatical features of Arabic.The parts of speech and their application with copious illustrations.(For Direct Entry Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents). 45h (T); E
ARA 264 Al-Muhadathah 2 Credits
Conversation in simple and correct Arabic. Familiar topics for discussion: drawn from school, market, home and common professions. (For Direct Entry Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents) 15h (T), 45h (P); E

ARA 265 At-Tarjamah I 2 Credits
Translation of simple passages selected from both classical and modern Arabic prose. (For Direct Entry Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents). 30h (T); E
ARA 266 Al-Insha’ 1 Credit
Composition in simple and correct Arabic.Topics to be treated in oral and written forms.(For Direct Entry Arabic minors without O/L Arabic or its equivalents). 15h (T); E
ARA 321 Arabic Literature of the Early Abbasid Period 2 Credits
Literature of the early Abbasid period from the 9th to the 10th centuries C.E. Historical background of the literary figure of the period and a study of selected prose and poetry composed by them. 30h (T); C
ARA 322 Arabic Literature of the Late Abbasid Period 2 Credits
A study of Arabic literature of the late Abbasid period from 10th to 13th century C.E. Historical background of selected text of the literary figures of the period and selected texts of their works. 30h (T); E
ARA 324 Art and Practice of Translation 2 Credits
Code and context meanings.Aspects of polysemy, oligosemy, shared experience and contractions. Absence of an idea and cases of figure between Arabic as a source language and its target language and vice versa. 30h (T); C
ARA 325 Arabic Rhetoric I 2 Credits
Introduction to al-Balaghah, including al-Fasahah.Historical development of Arabic Rhetoric.Comprehensive study of al-Bayanand its components.30h (T); C
ARA 326 Arabic Prosody 2 Credits
The sixteen traditional metres of Arabic poetry and their feet. Aspects of iambic metric rules and the exception as well as morphological and syntactical constraints imposed on the syllables in rhyme. Poetic licenses in Arabic. 30h (T); C
ARA 327 Advanced Arabic Reader I 2 Credits
Reading and comprehension of unvocalised work of literary Arabic prose, using a book of about 200 pages. 30h (T); E
ARA 328 Arabic Composition and Translation 3 Credits
Arabic essays on narrative, descriptive and argumentative topics.Emphasis on diction, presentation, grammar, punctuation and paragraphing. Translation of unvocalised passages of about 350 words each from Arabic into English and vice versa. Ten topics/passages to be treated in each case. 45h (T); E
ARA 329 Arabic Lexicography 2 Credits
Historical development of Arabic lexicography and events that led to early major dictionaries.Critical analysis of the methods of arranging the various lexicons. 30h (T); C
ARA 330 Development of Arabic Grammar 2 Credits
Historical development of Arabic grammar. Study of representative texts from Abu-l-Aswadi ’d-Du’ali to lbn Malik. 30h (T); C
ARA 332 Arabic Phonetics 2 Credits
Study of Arabic phonetics.Production and description of Arabic sounds from the perspectives of the point of articulation and the state of the glottis.Functions of the sounds in the language. Phonetic description of Arabic sounds. Phonological problems in the learning of Arabic as a second or third language in Nigeria. 15h (T), 45h (P); E
ARA 333 Arabic Dialectology 2 Credits
Survey of the survival of classical Arabic. Dynamic tendency for a language evolution. The superimposed dialect of Arabic known as “high” in a state of diglossia on the rest of the dialects marked “low”. Different types of cAmiyyah and a study of one of them. 30h (T); E

ARA 335 Arabic Syntax II 2 Credits
Major divisions of the noun ((al-ism), the verb (al-fi’l) the particle (al-harf). Different forms of the nominative, the accusative and the genitive. The role particles play in changing their use, advanced syntax books, such as Alfiyyah of Ibn Malik should be used. 30h (T); C
ARA 336 Arabic Morphology III 2 Credits
Detailed morphological analysis of nouns, treating such aspects of the diminutive and nouns of relation (an-Nisbah) posture (al-Hay’ah), place (makan), tool (‘alaah), number (marrah). Emphasis on the analysis of ‘ibdal (substitution) and i’lal(irregularity).Illustrations from classical and modern sources. 30h (T) C
ARA 337 Classical Arabic Criticism 2 Credits
Arabic literary criticism of the classical era. Emphasis on literary history, choice of words and the socio-political leaning of the poets and prose-writers studied. The major genres of classical Arabic literature and their exponents. 30h (T) C.
ARA 338 A Special Author 2 credits
Insight into the works of a specific author, his personality and biography 30h (T) E
ARA 339 Quranic Texts 2 credits
Contribution of the Qur’an to the development of Arabic Language & Literature. Literary appreciation of the Qur’an through a textual study of some selected verses with emphasis on al-balagah(Rhetoric). 30h (T) E
ARA 341 As-Sarfwa ‘n-Nahw 2 credits
Detailed study of Arabic morphology and syntax.Emphasis on the application of relevant morphological and syntactical rules. 45h (T) E
ARA 342 At-Tarjamah II 2 Credits
Selection of Arabic passages of about 200 words each for translation into English. 30h (T); E

ARA 343 At-Tarjamah III 2 Credits
Selection of English passages of about 200 words each for translation into Arabic.. 30h (T); E
ARA 351 Major Themes in Classical Arabic Literature 2 Credits
A general appraisal of the classical genres of Arabic literature, e.g. al-Madih, al-hija, al-ghazal, al-fakhr, al-khatabah, al-qlssah, and ar-risala to be studied in English with illustration in Arabic. 45h (T) E
ARA 361 Arabic Structures 3 Credits
Detailed study of syntax and morphology of standard Arabic.Intensive study of word classes and analysis of syntactical and morphological relations within and between sentences. Illustrations should be made from Islamic Arabic sources. 45h (T); E
ARA 362 Textual Reading and Translation I 3 Credits
Reading and comprehending vocalized prose passages in Arabic. Selected passages should be from Fiqh books like al-Akhdari, al-Ashmawi, and al-Muqaddimatu ‘l-izziyah. Translation of selected passages into English. 45h (T) E
ARA 363 Textual Reading and Translation II 3 Credits
Reading selected vocalized passages from the Risalah of Ibn-AbiZaydi ‘l-Qayrawani and Arba’un Hadith of Yahya b. Sharaf ‘n-Nawawi. Comprehension of selected passages and their translation into English. 45h (T); E
ARA 381 Information and Communication Technology for Arabic 2 Credits
Features of Arabic oriented computer hardware and software. Survey of Arabic Language & Literature software and Word Wide Web resources on Arabic Language & Literature. The practical use of computer in effecting Arabic writings. Examination of library potentials of the internet for Arabic Studies as well as other ICT resources helpful in Arabic Studies research. The use of keyboard for Arabic scripts, typesetting in Arabic, graphic designs, word processing etc. 15h (T), 15h (P), C

ARA 382 Arabic Composition 2 Credits
Arabic essays on narrative, descriptive and argumentative topics. Emphasis on direction, presentation, grammar, punctuation and paragraphing. 30h (T) C
ARA 384 Introduction to Comparative Literature 2 Credits
Development of comparative literature in Arabic, Basir ideas in comparative literature such as Arabic-Western Literary relations, the influence of Arabic on other literary traditions, translation theory, literature and religion, literature and the other Arts. 30h (h) C
ARA 386 Phonetics and Phonology 2 Credits
Study of Arabic phonetics. Production and description of Arabic sounds from the perspectives of the point of articulation and the state of the glottis. The Functions of the sounds in the language. Phonetic description of Arabic sounds. Phonological problems in the learning of Arabic as a second or third language in Nigeria. 15h (T), 15h (P); C
ARA 388 Research Methods in Arabic 2 Credits
Introduction to modern methods of research in Arabic Studies. Choice of a topic collection of data, interviews, administration of questionnaire, literature review methodology and the main body of the research, writing the concluding parts, the place of language and reference materials. 30h (T) C.
ARA 421 Arabic Literature of Post-Classical Period 2 Credits
Arabic Literature in the post-classical era usually referred t as the period of Decadence (from the fall of Baghdad in 1258 C.E. to the occupation of Egypt by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1798 C.E). Selected prose and poetry texts of the period. 30h (T); E.
ARA 422 Modern Arabic Poetry 2 Credits
Study of the development of modern Arabic poetry. Introduction and study of the works of the major poets; al-Barudi, Hafiz Ibrahim, Shawqi, Khalil Mutran, ar-Rusafi, ash-Shabbi, Abdul’r-RahmanShukri and BadrShakiru ‘S-Sayyab. 30h (T); C

ARA 423 Modern Arabic Literature II 2 Credits
Development of the short story and the novel in modern Arabic literature.Journalism and the press. Introduction to prose-writings of the following authors: NajibMahfuz, TahaHusayn, Mahmudu ‘l-Aqqad, Muhammad al-Muwaylihi, and Muhammad HusaynHaykal. 30h (T); E
ARA 424 West African Arabic Literature I 2 Credits
Arabic writings of West African origin in prose and poetry.Study of the writings of Nigerian authors with emphasis on three of them. 30h (T), E
ARA 425 West African Arabic Literature II 2 Credits
Critical editing of manuscripts of West African origin.Special authors and their works. 30h (T); E
ARA 426 Modern Arabic Literature in Nigeria 2 Credits
Major poetry and prose works by Nigerian authors after 1914. Old and new trends in such works.Examples of themes in poetry scenic and abstract descriptions, love, nationalism, panegyric, elegy, pedagogy and satire.The short story and drama. 30h (T); E
ARA 427 Arabic Rhetoric II 2 Credits
Detailed study of al-Macani andal-Badic . Special consideration of al-itnab, al-ijaz and al-Musawah under al-Macani andal-Muhassanatu ‘llafziyyahwa l-mac nawiyyah under al-Badic. 30h (T); C
ARA 430 Advanced Arabic Reader II 2 credits
Advanced Arabic prose for reading and comprehension. Two novels or collections of short stories of about 200 pages each should be read, comprehended and analysed 30h, (T) C.
ARA 432 Arabic Literature in Spain 2 Credits
Study of the spread of Arabic culture in Spain. Emergence of poets and essayists: Ibn Hani, IbnZaydun, Khafajah, IbnShuhayd and al-Mu’tamid b. al-Abad with emphasis on any three of them. 30h (T), E
ARA 433 Literature on Biladu’s-Sudan 2 Credits
Early Arabic records on West Africa, covering the reports by travellers, historians and geographers such as al-Bakri, Yaqut, IbnBattutah, as-Sa cdi and Muhammad Bello. Selections from such records for a study of theirstyle,content and form. 30h (T); E
ARA 434 Advanced Arabic Syntax 2 credits
Review of advanced linguistic studies on aspects of Arabic syntax. Different patterns of sentence construction, nominal and verbal sentences. The cycle types and the variables in types and complementisers for subordination and co-ordination. 30h (T), C.
ARA 435 The Theatre in Arabic 3 credits
Historical origin of drama in Arabic, contact with the West, a study of selected playwrights, e.g. Marunu n-Naqqash, Ahmed Shawqi, and Tawfiqu li-Hakim,ZakariyauOseni and Abdul-GhaniAlabi Adebayo in particular. Study of one full play by one of these writers. 30h (T), 45h (P); C
ARA 436 Advanced Arabic Translation and Composition 2 Credits
Translation from Arabic into English and vice-versa.Selection of fairly long passages from diverse sources. Advanced essay writing in Arabic of not less than 500 words each with emphasis on style and presentation. 30h (T); E
ARA 437 Modern Arabic Literary Criticism 2 Credits
Modern approach to Arabic literary criticism. Contact with the West ideologically based schools and the major exponents of modern criticism: al-Mazini, TahaHusayn and al-‘Aqqad. 30h (T); R
ARA 438 Classical and Modern Libraries 2 credits
Concept, types & development of both traditional/ e-libraries. Libraries in the Arab World and rejuvenation of Arabic cultural heritage.Indexing, abstracting &cataloguing. Basic reference information sources in Classical & Modern Arabic references such as encyclopedias, dictionaries, lexicography, thesaurus, linguistics, literature, geography, sciences, biography & Internet. Emphasis on primary sources in classical and modern Arabic literary works. 30h (T); E
ARA 439 Literature of the Mahjar 2 Credits
Arabic literary figures who migrated to the Americas: Jibran Khalil Jibran, Mikha’ilNucaymah, lliya Abu Madi, etc. Study of their literary output in prose and poetry. 30h (T); E
ARA 481 Modern Arabic Prose 2 credits
Study of the development of the short story and the novel in modern Arabic literature.Journalism and the press. Introduction to prose-writings of the following authors: NajibMahfuz, TahaHusayn, Mahmudu ‘l-Aqqad, Muhammad al-Muwaylihi, and Muhammad HusaynHaykal. 30h (T); C.
ARA 482 Nigerian Literature in Arabic 2 credits
Arabic writings of Nigerian origin in prose and poetry. Study of the writings of Nigerian authors such as Sheykh ‘Uthmanb.Fudi,Abdullah b. Fudi,MuhammadBello,Adam al-ilori,Ibrahim Umar Zaria,IsaAlabiAbubakar,ZakariyauOseni,MuhammadNasirKabara and Sulayman Ahmad.Emphasis on three of them. 30h (T) C.
ARA 483 Arabic Calligraphy & Manuscript Editing 2 credits
Study of Arabic Orthography from the pre-Islamic time to the evolution of the Naskh, Ruq’ah, Farisi, Kufi and Maghribi types of writing.Adoption of Maghribiscript in West Africa for Ajami scripts.Ability to read and write each with emphasis onRuq’ andMaghribi scripts.Critical editing of manuscripts West Africa origin.Special authors and their works. 30h (T). C
ARA 484 Advanced Arabic Translation 2 credits
Translation from Arabic into English and vice-versa.Selection of fairly long passages from diverse sources.A practical aspect of Translation theories. 30h (P), C.
ARA 486 Literature ofMaqamat 2 Credits
Evolution of Maqomat literature as one of the genres in Arabic Literature. Selections fromMaqomaatu al-Hamadhaniy, Al-Hariri, Majmau li-Bahrain, Alamatudduniya and Al-qorniy. 30h (T). E
ARA 490 Media Arabic 2 Credits
Major characteristics of Arabic Language usage in a second language situation as its affects media aspects-Print, Broadcast, Information Technology, Media literacy & Culture, News reporting, Language of the press. 30h (T).E
ARA 491 North Africa Literature 2 Credits
Eearly history of Arabic literature in Morocco, Tunisia, Libya, Algeria and Mauritania. Two poets and Two essayists should be selected from each area. Writings of the Northern African Region that are very widely read in Nigeria like HasanIbnMasud al –Layusi’sDaliya (Nailu li amani fi sharhttahaniy) Busairi’s Al-burdaandHamziya.
ARA 499 Long Essay 4 credits
A supervised long essay, written in either Arabic or English of 5,000 – 8,000 words based on individual research into an area of Arabic language, literature or both chosen by individual candidates but approved by the Department. 225 (P) C
B.A. ARABIC COURSES
LEVEL 100
HARMARTTAN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITTLE CREDIT/STATUS
ARA 121 Intermediate Arabic Grammar 3 C
ARA 125 Introduction to Arabic Literature 3 C
ARA 127 Introduction to Islamic Literature (al-Adabul-Islami) 2 credits
ARA 129 Arabic Reading skills 2 C
ARA 141 Beginners’ Arabic Conversation I 2 E
ARA 143 Beginners’ Arabic Reader I 2 E
ARA 145 Beginners’ Arabic Grammar 2 E

RAIN SEMESTER
COURSE ODE COURSE TITTLE CREDIT/STATUS
ARA 128 Language Drills 2 C
ARA 130 Introduction to Arabic Composition I 2 C
ARA 132 Translation Drills 2 C
ARA 134 Introduction to Morphology 2 C
ARA 142 Beginners Arabic Conversation II 1 E
ARA 144 Beginners Arabic Reader II 2 E

LEVEL 200
HARMATTAN SEMESTER
S/N CODE COUSE TITTLE CREDIT/STATUS
1 ARA 223 Arabic Composition II 2 C
2 ARA 225 Pre-Islamic Arabic Literature 2 C
3 ARA 227 The Art of Speech-Making in Arabic 2 C
4 ARA 229 Arabic Morphology II 2 C
5 ARA 241 Intermediate Arabic Reader I 2 C
6 ARA 243 An-Nahw 2 E
7 ARA 251 General Survey of Arabic Literature 2 E
8 ARA 261 Arabic for Textual Reading I 3 E
9 ARA 263 Arabic Structure 3 E
10 ARA 265 At-Tarjamah I 2 E

RAIN SEMESTER
S/N COURSE CODE COUSRE TITTLE CREDIT/STATUS
1 ARA 226 Arabic Lit. of The Early Islamic & Umayyad Period II 2 C
2 ARA 228 Arabic Syntax I 2 C
3 ARA 230 Contemporary Arabic Prose 2 C
4 ARA 232 Reading Skills ll 2 C
5 ARA 234 Introduction to Translation Study 2 C
6 ARA 242 Intermediate Arabic Reader II 2 E
7 ARA 262 Arabic for Textual Reading II 2E
8 ARA 264 Al-Muhadathah 2 E
9 ARA 266 Al-Insha’ 1 E

LEVEL 300
HARMATTAN
S/N COURSE CODE COURSE TITTLE CREDIT
STATUS
1 ARA 321 Arabic Lit. of the Early Abbasid Period 2 C
2 ARA 325 Arabic Rhetoric I 2 C
3 ARA 327 Advanced Arabic Reader I 2 E
4 ARA 329 Arabic Lexicography 2 C
5 ARA 333 Arabic Dialectology 2 E
6 ARA 335 Arabic Syntax II 2 C
7 ARA 337 Classical Arabic Criticism 2 C
8 ARA 339 Quranic Texts 2E
9 ARA 341 As-Sarf Wa ‘N-Nahw 2 E
10 ARA 343 At-Tarjamah III 2 E
11 ARA 351 Major Themes in Classical Arabic Lit. 2 E
12 ARA 361 Arabic Structure 3E
13 ARA 363 Textual Reading and Translation II 3 E
14 ARA 381 Information and Communication Technology for Arabic 2 C

RAIN SEMESTER
S/N COURSE CODE COURSE TITTLE CREDIT
STATUS
1 ARA 322 Arabic Lit. of The Late. Abbasid Period 2 E
2 ARA 324 Art and Practice of Translation 2 C
3 ARA 326 Arabic Prosody 2 C
4 ARA 330 Development of Arabic Grammar 2C
5 ARA 336 Arabic Morphology III 2 C
6 ARA 338 A Special Author 2 E
7 ARA 342 At-Tarjamah II 2 E
8 ARA 362 Textual Reading and Translation I 3 E
9 ARA 382 Arabic Composition 2 C
10 ARA 384 Introduction to Comparative Literature 2 C
11 ARA 386 Phonetics and Phonology 2 C
12 ARA 388 Research Methods in Arabic 2 R

LEVEL 400
HARMATTAN SEMESTER
S/N COURSE CODE COURSE TITTLE CREDIT
STATUS
1 ARA 421 Arabic Lit. of Post-Classical Period 2 E
3 ARA 425 West African Arabic Literature II 2 E
4 ARA 427 Arabic Rhetoric II 2 C
5 ARA 433 Literature on Biladu ‘Sudan 2 E
6 ARA 435 The Theatre in Arabic 3 C
8 ARA 437 Modern Arabic Literary Criticism 2 C
9 ARA 439 Literature of the Mahjar 2 E
10 ARA 481 Modern Arabic Prose 2 C
11 ARA 483 Arabic Calligraphy Manuscript Editing 2 C

RAIN SEMESTER
S/N COURSE CODE COURSE TITTLE CREDIT
STATUS
1 ARA 422 Modern Arabic Poetry 2 C
2 ARA 424 West African Arabic Literature I 2 C
3 ARA 426 Modern Arabic Lit. in Nigeria 2 E
4 ARA 430 Advanced Arabic Reader II 2 C
5 ARA 432 Arabic Literature in Spain 2 E
6 ARA 434 Advance Arabic Syntax 2C
7 ARA 438 Classical and Modern Libraries 2 E
8 ARA 482 Nigerian Literature in Arabic 2 C
9 ARA 484 Advanced Arabic Translation 2 C
10 ARA 499 Long Essay 4 C
SUMMARY
100 Level
Compulsory Courses:
ARA 121 (2), 125 (2), 127 (2), 128 (2), 129 (2), 130 (2), 132 (2), 134 (2) = 16 Credits
Required Courses:
GNS 111 (2), 112 (2) = 04 Credits
Elective Courses:
At least 4 Credits from relevant 100 level courses in LIN, also at least 4 Credits from RIS 121 (2), 122 (2), 123 (2), 126 (2) = 08 Credits Total = 32 Credits
200 Level
Compulsory Courses: ARA 223 (2), 225 (2), 226 (2), 227 (2), 228(2), 229 (2), 230 (2), 232 (2), 234 (2) = 18 Credits
Required Courses:
GNS 211 (2), 212 (2), GSE 202 (2), RIS 223 (2), 224 (2), 225 (2), 228 (2) = 14 Credits
Elective Courses: At least 4 Credits from relevant 200 courses in LIN = 04 Credits
Additional GNS 111 (2) & 112 (2) For D/E Students = 04Credits
Total = 36 Credits
300 Level
Compulsory Courses: ARA 321 (2), 324 (2), 325 (2), 326 (2), 329 (2),330 (2), 335 (2), 336, (2) 337 (2), 381 (2), 382 (2), 384 (2) 386 (2), 388(2) = 28 Credits
Required Courses:
GNS 311 (2) & 312 (1), GSE 301(2) = 06 Credits
Elective Courses: At least 10 Credits from ARA 322 (2), 327 (2),
333 (2), 336 (2) or 300 Level Courses in RIS = 10 Credits
Total = 36 Credits
400 Level
Compulsory Courses: ARA 422 (2) ARA 427 (2), 430 (2), 434 (2), 435 (2), 437 (2), 481 (2), 482 (2), 483 (2) ARA 484 (2), ARA 499 (4)= 24 Credits
Elective Courses: At least 10 Credits from ARA 421 (2), 425 (2), 426 (2), 432 (2), 433(2), 436 (2), 438 (2), 439 (2) , 486 (2), 490 (2), 491 (2) =10 Credits
Total = 34 Credits

Total Credits for Graduating Students: UME Candidates 120 Credits
D/E Students 90 Credits
TO BE ELIGIBLE FOR THE AWARD OF A DEGREE, A STUDENT MUST OBTAIN A TOTAL OF 120 CREDITS IN A 4 -YEAR DEGREE PROGRAMME, 90 CREDITS IN A 3 YEAR DEGREE PROGRAMME INCLUDING THOSE EARNED IN GNS 111, 112, 211, 212, 311AND 312.

THE DEPARTMENT ENGLISH

HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT
The English programme started in 1976 with 12 students and a teaching staff of 4 whose breakdown is as follows: 1 Lecturer II and 3 Graduate Assistants. A Professor and a staff of seven manned the programme in 1977. The pace of excellence was set right from the very beginning when the renowned teacher, Late Professor David Cook. took charge of the programme. Since after his tenure, we have had many other staff members who have headed the Department.
At inception, the Department was named the Department of Modern European Languages (MEL) comprising of English and French programmes, with Professors Sam Adewoye, Tunde Ajiboye, Olu Obafemi, E. E. Adegbija and Dr. Bukoye Arowolo succeeding as Heads of the Department. But when MEL was broken into English and French Departments in 2004, the two programmes started running in their respective academic structures. The English programme has been headed by Professors Charles Bodunde, V. A. Alabi, S. T. Babatunde, P. O. Balogun, Abdullahi S. Abubakar, Binta Ibrahim and Doctors G. A. Ajadi, and M. S. Abdullahi-Idiagbon. These scholars have made immense contributions to bring the Department to an enviable level and most of them are still available to steer the course of the Department with valuable counsels and peerless intellectual contributions.
At present, there are twenty-one (21) lecturers made up of 8 Professors, 1 Reader, 4 Senior Lecturers, 1 Lecturer I, 6 Lecturer II, and 1 Assistant Lecturer. Many of these lecturers have won outstanding research fellowships, academic distinctions and honours in and outside Nigeria.

PHILOSOPHY
The philosophy of the undergraduate English language and Literature-in-English programme is as follows:
In a country such as Nigeria where English is the lingua franca and the language of instruction in the educational system, a high level of proficiency in it is usually expected from the graduates of higher institutions, especially the universities. A higher level of competence and communicative skills is expected even more from graduates of English.
The B. A. (English) programme introduces students to the current trends of English usage in order to assist them to achieve the expected level of proficiency in pronunciation, articulateness in speech, correctness of grammar and usage, elegance of style and diction, and selective appropriateness of English varieties in various real-world situations. Furthermore, the programme equips students with the necessary faculties for making efficient judgments and achieving innovative and higher-order analytical thinking that will make them more suitable for the demands of today’s labour market.
Additionally, the tradition of liberal education is based on a concern with the whole man or woman; hence the acquisition of learning skills goes with a concomitant emphasis on character development. Literature, because of its concern with the complexities of human motivation and action, has an in-built tendency to impart moral and spiritual lessons which make its students so much more sensitive to, and empathetic with, the plight of others while developing a critical attitude to society. The problems of individuals and of society with which students of literature empathise are often imaginatively or creatively projected in the three literary genres of drama, prose fiction and poetry.

OBJECTIVES
English Language Component
The objectives of the undergraduate English language component are stated below:
(i) train students to acquire adequate communicative competence in both the spoken and written varieties of the English language, thereby giving them a good grounding and effective mastery of the Language in its various applications to achieve adequate self-expression and self-actualisation;
(ii) equip the students with the knowledge of the forms and features of the varieties of English used in different professional domains such as business communication, legal communication, electronic broadcast media, print journalism, advertising and sports commentaries, book publishing, and biography writing;
(iii) equip the students with adequate linguistic knowledge of the English Language through a detailed study of its sound system, its lexicon, its syntax, semantics and usage;
(iv) adequately prepare the students to pursue postgraduate studies in English Language or Linguistics, and to take up teaching and research opportunities at the appropriate level of education;
(v) orient students towards self-employment by a focus on skills such as writing (e.g. of articles in magazines, of speeches; designing and presenting special programmes on radio or TV, designing and publishing magazines, etc.), creative writing, and other kinds of original output through independent thought, inventiveness and creativity; and
(vi) enable students to overcome deficiencies in their English.

Literature-in-English Component
The objectives of the undergraduate Literature-in-English component are stated below:
(i) produce graduates who possess an informed literary and aesthetic sensibility and intellectual tools to appreciate any literary stimulus and event;
(ii) equip students with adequate knowledge of major landmarks in Literature-in-English in all genres and periods;
(iii) Produce skillful and eloquent users of English for literary and artistic creativity;
(iv) impart a humanistic perspective to students by acquainting them with literature as an expression of lofty ideas and aspirations;
(v) train students to relate literary works and experiences to their social environment;
(vi) stimulate in the students the aptitude for creativity and innovation in the exploration of investment opportunities in the culture and art industry;
(vii) encourage knowledge of literature on regional and continental bases in order to apply their interpretations in relation to their own literary cultural experiences;
(viii) analyse materials and examine the relevance of multiple interpretations in the diverse society; and
(ix) discuss representative literary texts and critical theory to enhance a life-long learning process.

TITLE OF DEGREE: B.A.(Hons.) English
HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS
i. Prof. David Cook MEL 1977-1987
ii. Prof. Sam Adewoye MEL 1087-1989
iii. Prof. Tunde Ajiboye MEL 1989-1990 & 1993-1997
iv. Prof. Olu Obafemi MEL 1990- 1993
v. Prof. E. E. Adegbija MEL 1997-2000
vi. Dr. Bukoye Arowolo MEL 2000-2002
vii. Prof. C. A. Bodunde MEL/English 2002-2006
viii. Dr. G. A. Ajadi English 2006-2008
ix. Prof. (Mrs.) V. A. Alabi English 2008-2010 & 2012-2015
x. Prof. S.T. Babatunde English 2010-2012
xi. Prof. P. O. Balogun English 2015-2016

xii. Dr. M. S. Abdullahi-Idiagbon English March, 2016-May, 2016
xiii. Prof. A. S. Abubakar English May, 2016-2018 & 2019-2021
xiv. Prof. B. Ibrahim English 2018-2019
xiv. Prof. O. C. Medubi English August 2021 - date

ACADEMIC AND NON-ACADEMIC STAFF
LIST OF ACADEMIC STAFF
Name Qualifications Rank
Prof. C. A. Bodunde B. A. (ABU); M. A. (Unibadan); Ph.D. (Unilorin) Professor
Prof. (Mrs.) V. A. Alabi B. A. (Ibadan) M. A. and Ph.D. (Unilorin) Professor
Prof. S. T. Babatunde B. A. (Ibadan), M. A. , Ph.D. (Unilorin) Professor
Prof. (Mrs.) O. C. Medubi B. A. (Unilag); M. A. and Ph.D. (Unilorin) Professor
Prof. A. S. Abubakar B. A. (BUK), M. A.; Ph. D. and PGDE (Unilorin) Professor
Prof. M. A. Adedimeji B.A.; M.A.; Ph.D. (Unilorin) Professor
Prof. T. A. Alabi
B. A.(Ed.); M.A.; and Ph.D.(Unilorin) Professor
Prof. (Mrs.) B. F. Ibrahim B.A. ; M.A.; Ph.D.; PGDE. (Unilorin) Professor
Dr. K. A. Abdullahi B. A. (BUK); M. A. (Unilorin); Ph.D. (ABU). Reader
Dr. T. Oloruntoba-Oju B.A. and M.A. (Unilorin); M.A. (Reading); Ph.D.(Unibadan). Senior Lecturer
Dr. O. I. Dunmade B.A. and M.A. (Ife); Ph.D. (Unilorin); Ph.D. (UniAdo). Senior Lecturer
Dr. K. N. Afolayan B.A (Unilorin); M.A. (Unilag); PhD. (Unilorin) Senior Lecturer
Dr. (Mrs.) F. Aliyu-Ibrahim B.A. (Hons.); M.A.; and Ph.D. (Unilorin); PGD Journalism Senior Lecturer
Dr. Mrs. I. T. Osuolale-Ajayi B.A. (Hons.); M.A. (Unilorin) Lecturer I
Mrs. M. A. Nurudeen B.A. (Hons.) (ABU); M. A. (Unilorin) Lecturer II
Mr. M. O. Durosinmi B.A. (Hons.) (ABU); M. A. (Unilorin) Lecturer II
Mrs. B. J. Balogun B.A. (Ed); M.A. (Unilorin) Lecturer II
Mrs. N.B. Salihu B.A. (Ed.) (Unilorin); M.A. (Nottingham) Lecturer II
Mrs. S. A. Salihu B. A. (Hons.); M. A. (Unilorin). Lecturer II
Mrs. K. Olufadi B.A. (Hons.); M.A. (Unilorin). Lecturer II
Miss U. E. Inyang B.A. (Hons.) (Uyo); M.A. (Unilorin) Assistant Lecturer
LIST OF NON-ACADEMIC STAFF
Name Rank / Designation Qualifications
Mrs. Roseline A. Folorunsho Chief Secretarial Secretary (Secretary to the Department) W.A.S.C.; (Unilorin Staff Dev. Coll.; Unilorin Computer Centre)
Abdulkadir Abdulrazak Senior Executive Officer HND (Kwara Polytechnic)
Mr. Yusuf S. Magaji Assistant Executive Officer SSCE; NCE (NABTEB); B.Ed. (Unilorin)
Mrs. A. A. Alamoyo Caretaker SSCE

ADMINISTRATION
The Head of Department is assisted by other members of staff in the day-to-day administration. Coordinators are appointed to organise postgraduate, sandwich, preliminary studies, and Use of English programmes as well as seminars and to take care of students’’ academic projects. Committees are also set up to make input into decisions on the different organs of the department (See chart for details).

DEPARTMENTAL COMMITTEES FOR 2020/2021 SESSION
1. SEMINAR AND PUBLICATION COMMITTEE
Prof. C. A. Bodunde — Chairperson
Prof. O. C. Medubi — Member Prof. T. A. Alabi — Member
Dr. K. A. Abdullahi — Secretary

2. CURRICULUM COMMITTEE
Prof. S. T. Babatunde — Chairperson
Dr. T. Oloruntoba-Oju — Member
Dr. I. O. Dunmade — Member
Dr. F. Aliyu-Ibrahim — Secretary

3. DIRECT TEACHING AND LABORATORY COST C OMMITTEE
Prof. C. A. Bodunde — Chairperson
Prof. V. A. Alabi — Member
Mrs. M. A. Nurudeen — Secretary

4. POSTGRADUATE COMMITTEE
All Professors, Readers and Senior Lecturers
PG Coordinator as Secretary

5. BOARD OF STUDIES — All Academic Staff

6. WELFARE COMMITTEE
Dr. I. T. Osuolale-Ajayi — Chairperson
Mrs. B. J. Balogun __ Member
Mrs. N. B. Salihu __ Member
Mrs. Roseline A. Folorunsho — Secretary
7. COORDINATOR, LONG ESSAY
Mrs. M. A. Nurudeen

8. LEVEL ADVISERS
100 Level — Mrs. K. Olufadi
200 Level — Mrs. B. J. Balogun
300 Level — Mrs. S. A. Salihu
400 Level — Mrs. M. A. Nurudeen

9. POSTGRADUATE COORDINATOR
Dr. K. N. Afolayan

10. EXAMINATION OFFICER
Dr. (Mrs.) F. Aliyu-Ibrahim — Assisted by Mrs. N. B. Salihu

11. COMPUTATION COMMITTEE
Dr. Mrs. F. Aliyu-Ibrahim — Chairperson
Mr. M. O. Durosinmi — Secretary
All Level Advisers as Members

12. GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING COMMITTEE
Dr. I. O. Dunmade — Chairperson
Dr. K. A. Abdullahi — Member
Mrs. B. J. Balogun — Secretary

13. COMMITTEE ON NON-DEGREE PROGRAMMES
Dr. K. Abdullahi — Remedial Programme Organizer
Mrs. N. B. Salihu __ Immersion Programme Coordinator

14. USE OF ENGLISH COORDINATOR
Mr. M. O. Durosinmi
15. SANDWICH COORDINATOR
Mrs. I. T. Osuolale-Ajayi
16. STAFF ADVISER TO NASELS (Students` Association)
Mrs. K. Olufadi

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
COURSE R E Q U I R E M E N T S UTME SUBJECTS SPECIAL CONSIDERATION
(WAIVER) REMARKS
DIRECT ENTRY U.T.M. E.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE IN ENGLISH
At least two ‘A’ Level passes to include Literature in English and one other Arts or Social Science Subject
Five ‘O’ level credit passes to include Literature in English, English Language and three other Arts/Social Science Subjects
Literature in English, one other Arts subject and another Arts of Social Science subject
DIRECT ENTRY
UNILORIN accepts NCE with English major.

UTME
UNILORIN accepts any Arts/Social Science Subject.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
The Programme, like other first-degree programmes in the Faculty of Arts, will run for four academic sessions of eight semesters for UTME students and three academic sessions of six semesters for Direct Entry students.

COURSE OUTLINES
The following courses are taught in the Department:
100 LEVEL
ENG 101 English Language I 2 Credits
History, sound, grammar, semantic system and varieties of English. Role of English as an international language. 30h (T); C
ENG 102 English Language II 2 Credits
Salient features of English Grammar: basic sentence, clause, phrase and word structures as well as inter-sentential relations. 30h (T); C
ENG 103 Spoken English 2 Credits
Conversational English, using relevant phonological materials (e.g. tapes, records, video, films, etc.) to enhance the students’ spoken English. 30h (T), (P); C
ENG 105 Literary Appreciation 2 Credits
Rudiments of literary appreciation. Literature as a foundation for the higher literary criticism courses. 30h (T); C
ENG 106 Basic English Grammar and Composition 3 Credits
Rudiments of English grammar and relevance to composition. 45h (T); C
ENG 107 Theatre Workshop 3 Credits
Practical skills of theatre, speech and voice training: Techniques of improvisation, acting and stage construction. 135h (P); C
ENG 114 Introduction to Nigerian Literature 2 Credits
Literary developments through the pioneer period, the colonial as well as the postcolonial stages. Modes of poetry, drama, prose / fiction of major Nigerian writers. 30h (T); C
ENG 115 Introduction to Poetry 3 Credits
Nature, form and characteristics of poetry. Acquisition of the tools and techniques of poetic appreciation and analysis. 45h (T); C
ENG 116 Introduction to Prose Fiction 3 Credits
Literary tenets of the fictional mode. Techniques of fiction and thematic focus. Genres: the satirical novel, the romance, the historical novel, war fiction, epic novel, literary biography and literary autobiography. 45h (T); E
ENG 117 Introduction to African Oral Literature 3 Credits
Traditional oral forms in selected African regions. Basic tenets of oral performances, the nature and context of performance. Rudiments of data collection, transcription and translation of oral texts. 45h (T); C
ENG 118 Introduction to Drama and Theatre 3 Credits
Nature and artistic features of drama and theatre. Acquisition of the tools and techniques of drama and theatre through the analysis of selected African and non-African plays. 45h (T); E
ENG 119 Introduction to European Literature in Translation 3 Credits
Introduction to translated works from European literature. Study of selected national literatures, literary movements and their social and cultural impulses. Selected works from Italian, German and French literatures. 45h (T); E
200 LEVEL
ENG 203 Introduction to General Phonetics and Phonology I 2 Credits
Principles of phonetic description and taxonomy. 30h (T), C
ENG 204 Introduction to General Phonetics and Phonology II 2 Credits
Application of the principles of phonetics and phonology. Emphasis on practical examples and language laboratory exercises, particularly those likely to be relevant to English in Nigeria. 30h (T); C
ENG 205 Advanced English Composition I 3 Credits
Specialized composition: reports, long essays, minutes of meetings, various types of letters, etc. 45h (T); E
ENG 206 Advanced English Composition II 3 Credits
Technical matters related to kinds of writings: reports, minutes, memoranda, long essays, etc. 45h (T); E
ENG 207 History of the English Language 3 Credits
Diachronic study of the development of the English Language, from the old English period to its present-day status as a world language. 45h (T); EENG 209 Language and Society 3 Credits
Examination of Language in its social context. Emphasis on variations based on age, sex, ethnicity, social status, etc. 45h (T); E
ENG 210 Creative Writing I 3 Credits
Stimulating creative potentials of students. Instruction on imaginative writing with specific reference to poetry, drama and prose. (Prerequisite for ENG 328) 45h (T); E
ENG 215 History of Theatre: Aeschylus to Shakespeare 2 Credits
Forms, characteristics and conventions of theatre from Aeschylus to Shakespeare (Cannot be taken with ENG 217). 30h (T); C
ENG 216 Modern Comedy: Moliere to Soyinka 2 Credits
Comedy as a genre. Texts of comedians from Moliere to Soyinka. (Cannot be taken with ENG 222) 30h (T); C
ENG 217 European Theatre Since Ibsen 2 Credits
European Theatre from Ibsen to Modern times. Theatre of the Absurd. (Cannot be taken with ENG 215) 30h (T); C
ENG 218 Introduction to Stylistics 2 Credits
Basic principles of linguistic and literary analysis. Features of texts which instigate markedness and their corresponding implications for interpretation and appreciation of the discourse. 30h (T); C
ENG 219 English Syntax I 2 Credits
Major syntactic constituents in a text such as cohesive devices, concord, syntactic units and how coordinators and subordinators affect sentence varieties in a text. Essential elements of tense and concord. 30h (T); C
ENG 220 English Syntax II 2 Credits
Grammatical theories of syntax emphasizing the syntactic analysis of phrases and clauses. Detailed study of one theory of linguistic analysis (e.g. transformational grammar). Some simple syntactic processes in English: passivization, nominalization and complementation. 30h (T); C
ENG 221 Introduction to American Literature 2 Credits
Selection of American imaginative works with focus on literature and its role in historical and political developments study of major American authors in the various genres. (Cannot be taken with ENG 223.) 30h (T); C
ENG 222 Introduction to African Literature 2 Credits
Development of African literature in English from a literary historical perspective: African poetry, African drama and African prose/fiction. Developments in literary genres, language and movements. (Cannot be taken with ENG 216.) 30h (T); E
ENG 223 English Literature: The Renaissance Period 2 Credits
Literary movements, themes and major authors from the Accession of the Tudors to the Restoration of Charles II. (Cannot be taken with ENG 221.) 30h (T); C
ENG 224 English Literature: Neo-Classical Period 2 Credits
Convention and Realism from the Restoration to the end of the Neo-classical Age. (Cannot be taken with ENG 226.) 30h (T); C
ENG 226 English Literature from the Beginning 2 Credits
Literary types and sub-types from Anglo-Saxon invasion to the Norman Conquest. (Cannot be taken with ENG 224.) 30h (T); C

300 LEVEL
ENG 304 Introduction to Semantics 2 Credits
Concentration on sense properties and sense relations, problems of word versus sentence meaning, semantic nakedness, etc. Situating the course within the general framework of linguistic semantics. (Only for Language emphasis) 30h (T); C
ENG 306 Discourse Analysis 2 Credits
Introduction to the principle and practice of discourse analysis. Practical analysis, study and description of relevant textual materials. Features of coherence and cohesion as well as intra and inter-sentential paragraph devices in texts. (Compulsory for Language emphasis, Elective for Literature emphasis) 30h (T); C/E
ENG 307 Introduction to Sociolinguistics 2 Credits
Basic concepts and applications of sociolinguistics. Relationship between language and society: language varieties, social dialects and the problems of multilingualism. Language in relation to development. (Compulsory for Language emphasis, Elective for Literature emphasis) 30h (T); C/E
ENG 315 English Literature: Romantic Movement 2 Credits
Representative authors and dominant literary features of the Romantic period. (Compulsory for Literature emphasis, Elective for Language emphasis) 30h (T); C/E
ENG 316 English Literature: Victorian Period 2 Credits
Representative authors and dominant literary features of the Victorian period. (Only for Literature emphasis) 30h (T); C
ENG 317 English Literatures: Modern Period 2 Credits
Representative authors and dominant literary features of the twentieth century. (Only for Literature emphasis) 30h (T); C
ENG 321 African Drama 2 Credits
Origin and development of written dramatic works in Africa. Response of African writers through theatre to their cultural, social and political situation. Close study of the works of the major dramatists in the various regions of the continent. (Only for Literature emphasis) 30h (T); C
ENG 323 Seminar in Criticism 2 Credits
A writing seminar designed to develop skill and insight. Emphasis is on the writing of critical essays: poetry, drama and prose. (Only for Literature emphasis) 30h (T); E
ENG325 Contemporary English Usage 2 Credits
English in its contemporary form. Variations according to uses and users. Notion of correctness and grammaticalness. Problem of defining Standard English worldwide. (Only for Language emphasis) 30h (T); C
ENG 326 Phonology of English 2 Credits
Approaches (phonemic, prosodic, distinctive and generative) to the study of English. Segmental and non-segmental phonemes and their organization with a view to improving the students’ perception and production of these sounds. Emphasis and analysis of phonological features in connected speech. (Only for Language emphasis) 30h (T); C
ENG 327 A Survey of Applied Linguistics 2 Credits
Approaches to language analysis in the classroom: contrastive analysis, error analysis, discourse analysis, English for specific purposes, computer-assisted language learning and the internet, etc. Practical application of the various analytical models and their implications for teaching. (Only for Language emphasis) 30h (T); C
ENG 328 Creative Writing II 2 Credits
A practical class. Advanced stimulation of latent creative skills in the students, particularly in the areas of poetry, drama and prose. (Student must have offered ENG 210) 30h (T); E
ENG 329 The English Language in Nigeria 2 Credits
History, features and functions of English in Nigeria and the consequent emergence of virile local varieties and changes leading to the evolution of a Nigerian standard. Examination of English and the national language question as well as language attitudes among Nigerians. (Compulsory for Language emphasis, Elective for Literature emphasis) 30h (T); C/E
ENG 330 Philosophy of Language 2 Credits
Contemporary issues in the philosophy of language: private language, meaning and reference, naming and necessity theories of description, indexical reference and the language of thought. Isolation, clarification and solutions to language problems. 30h (T); E
ENG 331 Grammatical Theories 2 Credits
Major theories of grammatical description: traditional, structural, systemic and transformational-generative theories of grammar and their impacts on the description of English. 30h (T); E
ENG 332 Principles of Semiotics 2 Credits
Science of signs and sign systems. Metalanguage of semiotics and the process of semiotic analysis. Application of semiotics to communication in social context. 30h (T); E
ENG 333 English for Professional Purposes 2 Credits
Vocabulary, sentence structure and writing styles of English in banking, law, advertising, administration, business, the media, etc. Critical examination, study and production of texts in different professions. 30h (T); E
ENG 334 Systemic Grammar 2 Credits
Guide to the patterns and organization of English at the morpheme, word, group, clause and sentence levels. Categories of unit, class, structure and system of English. Surface and deep structures of grammar. (Only for Language emphasis) 30h (T); C
ENG 335 African Poetry 2 Credits
Origin and developments of written poetry in various parts of Africa. Poetic movement, categories, literary language and selected poetry anthologies. (Only for Literature) emphasis) 30h (T); C

ENG 336 African Fiction 2 Credits
Study of the novels by Major African and non-African authors of each region dealing with African themes, life and experiences. (Only for Literature emphasis) 30h (T); C
ENG 338 Introduction to the Literature of Black Diaspora 2 Credits
Concept of Black Diaspora. General survey of roots and sources in the literature of Black Diaspora; the major stages, periods, and influences; the major themes, including the themes of alienation, dislocation, colonization and neo-colonization. 30h (T); E
ENG 339 Research Methods I 2 Credits
Methods and tools of research: research question, hypothesis, population and sampling, instrumentation, literature review, etc. 30h (T); C
ENG 340 Literary Criticism 2 Credits
Critical and literary traditions across periods. Forms of criticisms: genre, deconstruction, archetypal, formalist, etc. (Only for Literature emphasis) 30h (T); C
ENG 342 Introduction to the Practice of Theatre 2 Credits
Rudiments of theatre practice: choice of play, casting, directing, costuming, lighting, stage management and theatrical productions. Stimulating the theatrical process through the production of short plays or theatrical sketches. 30h (T); E
400 LEVEL
ENG 421 Trends in Syntax 2 Credits
Syntactic treatment of topics of relevance or currency: pronominalization, complement structures, case marking, thematic roles, negation and grammatical categories (tense, aspect, mood, tense marking, etc).30h (T); E
ENG 422 Pragmatics 2 Credits
Utterance meaning as distinct from sentence meaning. Socio-cultural and linguistic rules that determine the correct interpretation of terms in the real world. 30h (T); E
ENG 423 Psycholinguistics 2 Credits
Relationship between language and mind: language acquisition, language learning, thinking and cognition, language and the brain, language localization, linguistic performance and behaviour, production and comprehension, and language impairment. 30h (T); E
ENG 424 Multilingualism 2 Credits
Identification, study and analyses of problems of national languages, official orthographies, languages to be taught in schools, language policy and language planning. Specific reference to the position of English in multilingual African and other nations. 30h (T); E
ENG 425 English for Specific Purposes 2 Credits
Preconditions for functional and goal-oriented (English) language learning in meeting linguistic and communicative needs of specialist students. Formulation, administration and follow-up (activities) of English language teaching curriculum in applied contexts. 30h (T); E
ENG 426 Language and National Development 2 Credits
Constraints and prospects placed on national development by the linguistic situation in developing African nations. Language as the most effective means of human communication and as cornerstone of mass participation in the development process itself. 30h (T); E
ENG 427 Speech Writing 2 Credits
Speech writing as a communication skill. Speech types, organization and mechanics of speech writing. 30h (T); E
ENG 428 Language and Media Studies 2 Credits
Major characteristics of language usage in a second language situation as it affects media aspects – Print, Broadcast, Information Technology, Media Literacy and Culture, Attitude Cultivation and Conditioning, Rural Communication, Africa in the 21st Century, etc. Review of major media theories: Mass Society Theory, Limited Effect Theory, Cultural Theory, Critical Cultural Theory, etc. 30h (T); E

ENG 429 Studies in Fiction 2 Credits
Novel as a form of literary expression. Textual analysis of major novels written in or translated into English (Works are to be selected in such a way as to reflect the major landmarks in the development of the novel). Major theories of the novel and different approaches in the criticism of fiction. 30h (T); E
ENG 430 Studies in Poetry 2 Credits
Major poetic forms in English or translated into English. Kinds (genres) of poetry and how poetic forms developed in response to aesthetic and intellectual movement. 30h (T); E
ENG 431 Studies in Drama 2 Credits
Major dramatic works in English or translated into English. Texts which are adjudged to be representative of the major landmarks in dramatic literature from the classical to the present will be studied. 30h (T); E
ENG 432 Advanced Practical Theatre 2 Credits
Major theatrical trends across periods: the Greek, Roman, Elizabethan, Jacobean, Italian, Renaissance and African theatres. Theories of the stage from Aristotelian through Naturalism to Absurdist theatre and related practices. Study of the African stage and the contemporary theatre practice.
30h (T); E
ENG 433 Studies in Caribbean and African-American Literature 2 Credits
Major works of selected authors in the regions. Distinctive literary traditions of the regions: innovative literary language like Pidgin or Creole, reinvention of genres, transposition of African oral traditions, and retrieval of the African performance traditions in drama and poetry and the use of the epic journey mode. 30h (T); E
ENG 434 Studies in American Literature 2 Credits
Study of selected American poets, dramatists, novelists and literary autobiographers with emphasis on American imaginative works which express the history and political trends of the modern period. 30h (T); E
ENG 435 Research Methods II 3 Credits
Emphasis on data analysis and description. Preparing students for research report writing. 45h (T); C
ENG 436 Literature and the Media 2 Credits
Various outlets of circulating literature. Establishing the literary features/tenets of literature produced in the media: newspaper, radio, T.V., internet and literary magazines. Study of genres such as newspaper poetry, newspaper short story, radio drama, internet short story and internet home video. 30h (T); E
ENG 437 Stylistics 3 Credits
Study, description and analysis of various sample literary texts by the principles of literary theory and practice as well as the principles of linguistic analysis. 45h (T) C
ENG 438 Modern Literary Theory 2 Credits
Recent trends in Literary Theory including their relevance to African Literature. 30h (T); E
ENG 439 The Practice of Creative Writing 2 Credits
Techniques of fiction, verse, drama, literary biography and autobiography 30h (T); E
ENG 440 Fundamentals of Journalism 2 Credits
Historical development of newspapers in Nigeria. Functions of newspaper offices and officers. The Press and Press laws. The Press in Nigeria. News reporting. Free lancing. Professional code. Language of the Press. 30h (T); E
ENG 499 Research Project 5 Credits
Each student under the guidance of an approved supervisor is required to conduct research in an area approved by the Department, culminating in the submission of a project. 225h (P); C

LIST OF COURSES
100 LEVEL
1ST SEMESTER COURSES
S/NO COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO OF CREDITS
1. ENG 101 English Language I 2
2. ENG 103 Spoken English 2
3. ENG 105 Literary Appreciation 2
4, ENG 107 Theatre Workshop 3
5. ENG 115 Introduction to Poetry 3
6. ENG 117 Introduction to African Oral Literature 3
7. ENG 119 Introduction to European Literature in Translation 3

2nd SEMESTER
S/NO COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO OF CREDITS
1. ENG 102 English Language II 2
2. ENG 106 Basic English Grammar & Composition 3
3. ENG 114 Introduction to Nigerian Literature 2
4. ENG 116 Introduction to Prose Fiction 3
5. ENG 118 Introduction to Drama and Theatre 3

200 Level
1st Semester
S/NO COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO OF CREDITS
1. ENG 203 Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology I 2
2. ENG 205 Advanced English Composition I 2
3. ENG 207 History of the English Language 3
4. ENG 209 Language and Society 3
5. ENG 215 History of Theatre : Aeschylus to Shakespeare 2
6. ENG 217 European Theatre Since Ibsen 2
6, ENG 219 English Syntax I 2
7. ENG 221 Introduction to American Literature 2
8. ENG 223 English Literature: The Renaissance Period 2

200 Level 2nd Semester
S/NO COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO OF CREDITS
1. ENG 204 Introduction to General Phonetics & Phonology II 2
2. ENG 206 Advanced English Composition II 2
3. ENG 210 Creative Writing I 3
4. ENG 216 Modern Comedy Moliere to Soyinka 2
5. ENG 218 Introduction to Stylistics 2
6. ENG 220 English Syntax II 2
7. ENG 222 Introduction to African Literature 2
8. ENG 223 English Literature: The Renaissance Period 2
9. ENG 224 English Literature Neo-Classical Period 2

300 LEVEL
1ST Semester
S/NO COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO OF CREDITS
1. ENG 315 English Literature: Romantic Movement 2
2. ENG 317 English Literature: Modern Period 2
3.. ENG 325 Contemporary English Usage 2
4. ENG 327 A Survey of Applied Linguistics 2
5. ENG 329 The English Language in Nigeria 2
6. ENG 335 African Poetry 3
7. ENG 339 Research Methods I 2
2nd Semester
S/NO COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO OF CREDITS
1. ENG 304 Introduction to Semantics 2
2. ENG 306 Discourse Analysis 2
3. ENG 316 English Literature: The Victorian Period 2
4. ENG 326 Phonology of English 2
5. ENG 328 Creative Writing II 2
7. ENG 330 Philosophy of Language 2
8. ENG 332 Principles of Semiotics 2
9. ENG 334 Systemic Grammar 2
10. ENG 336 African Fiction 2
11. ENG 338 Introduction to the Literature of Black Diaspora 2
12. ENG 340 Literary Criticism 2
13. ENG 342 Introduction to the Practice of Theatre 2

400 Level
1st Semester
S/NO COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO OF CREDITS
1. ENG 421 New Trends in Syntax 2
2. ENG 423 Psycholinguistics 2
3. ENG 425 English for Specific Purposes 2
4. ENG 427 Speech Writing 2
5. ENG 429 Studies in Fiction 2
6. ENG 431 Studies in Drama 2
7. ENG 433 Studies in Caribbean & Afro-American Literature 2
8. ENG 435 Research Methods II 3
9. ENG 437 Stylistics 3
10. ENG 439 The Practice of Creative Writing 2
2nd Semester
S/NO COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO OF CREDITS
1. ENG 422 Pragmatics 2
2. ENG 430 Studies in Poetry 2
3. ENG 432 Advanced Practical Theatre 2
4. ENG 434 Studies in American Literature 2
5. ENG 438 Modern Literary Theory 2
6. ENG 440 Fundamentals of Journalism 2

Summary
100 Level
Compulsory Courses: ENG101 (2), 102 (2), 103 (2), 105 (2) 106 (3), 107 (3), 114 (2), 115 (3), 117 (3) = 23 Credits
Required Courses: GNS111 (2), 112 (2) = 4 Credits
Elective Courses:
(a) 4 Credits from HIS, PFA, Religion, LNG, YOR, FRE, Arabic = 4 C
(b) 3 Credits from ENG 116 (3), 118 (3), 119 (3) = 3 Credits Total = 33 Credits

200 Level
Compulsory Courses: ENG 203 (2), 204 (2), 205 (2), 218 (2), 219 (2), 220 (2), - {215 (2) or 217 (2)} {216 (2) or 222 (2)} {(221) (2) or 223 (2)} (224 (2) or 226(2)} = 20 Credits
Required Courses: GNS211 (2), 212 (2) = 4 Credits
Elective Courses: (a) 4 Credits from HIS, PFA, Religion, LNG, YOR, FRE, Arabic = 4 Credits
(b) 5 Credits from ENG 206 (2), 207 (3), 209 (3), 210 (3)
= 5 Credits
Total = 33 Credits
DE Students: GNS111 (2) & GNS112 (2) = 4 Credits
Total= 37 Credits
300 Level
(a) Language Emphasis
Compulsory Courses: ENG304 (2), 306 (2), 307 (2), 325 (2), 326 (2), 327 (2), 329 (2), 334 (2), 339 (2) = 18 Credits
Required Courses: GNS311 (2), GSE 301(3) = 5 Credits
Elective Courses: At least 10 Credits from ENG315 (2), 328 (2), 330 (2), 331 (2), 332 (2), 333 (2), 342 (2) = 10 Credits
Total = 33 Credits
(b) Literature Emphasis
Compulsory Courses: ENG315 (2), 316 (2), 317 (2), 321 (2), 335 (2), 336 (2), 339 (2), 340 (2) =16 Credits
Required Courses: GNS311 (2), GSE 301 (3) = 5 Credits
Elective Courses: At least 12 Credits from ENG 306 (2), 307 (2), 323 (2), 328 (2), 329 (2), 330 (2), 332 (2), 333 (2), 338 (2), 342 (2) = 12 Credits
Total = 33 Credits
400 Level
Compulsory Courses: ENG 435 (3), 437 (3), 499 (5) = 11 Credits
Elective Courses:
Language Emphasis : At least 22 Credits from ENG421 (2), 422 (2), 423 (2), 424 (2), 425 (2), 426 (2), 427 (2), 428 (2), 429 (2), 430 (2), 431 (2), 433 (2), 434 (2), 436 (2), 438 (2), 439 (2), 440 (2) = 22 Credits Total = 33 Credits
Literature Emphasis: At least 22 Credits from ENG424 (2), 425 (2), 426 (2), 427 (2), 428 (2), 429 (2), 430 (2), 431 (2), 432 (2), 433 (2), 434 (2), 436 (2), 438(2), 439 (2), 440 (2) = 22 Credits
Total = 33 Credits

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
A student shall qualify for the award of a degree when he/she has:
(a) completed and passed ALL the compulsory and required courses he/she registered for as may be offered by the University/Faculty, including GNS 111, 112, 211, 212, 311.
(b) earned the minimum credit units of not less than 120 for UTME and 90 for DE candidates.

DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH
History of Department
The French Programme began in 1977 as a degree programme in the Department of Modern European Languages. The first French student was Mr. Patt Amadi who graduated in 1981.

Initially, students were sent to France for the Year Abroad Programme. But as from 1982 to 1989, they were sent to Lomé, in Togo. The high cost of maintenance of students forced the University to settle for the French Language Village at Ajara, Badagry for the Programme since 1992. However, following a memorandum of understanding recently signed between University of Ilorin and Université d’Abomey Calavi in Bénin Republic arrangements are on-going to send our 300 Level French students to the former.

Since becoming a full Department in 2004, The Department of French has worked out a programme which caters for students wishing to take French as a minor course. There is also a Functional French Programme for the entire University Community.

Department of French, as at today, boasts of two Professors, one Reader, four Senior Lecturers, two Lecturer I, one Lecturer II, four Assistant Lecturers and one Graduate Assistant. There are now 130 students offering French from the B. A. to the Ph.D levels.

Programme/Sub-Discipline/Discipline Philosophy and objectives:

The major preoccupation of French as a discipline, like all other disciplines of the Arts and Humanities, is to enhance the role of man and improve his relationship with his immediate environment. It is, in particular, to train young men and women in achieving necessary competence and skills in the dynamic use of French to meet the communicative demands imposed by global interactions.

B.A. FRENCH PROGRAMME
PHILOSOPHY

Language is an instrument of communication and the knowledge of other people’s language is a powerful tool for bridging communication gaps between nations of diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds. The importance of the study and knowledge of French in Nigeria is quite obvious. Nigeria is surrounded by French-speaking African countries and Africa is at the center of Nigeria’s foreign policy. Nigeria is also an active member of the AU, ECOWAS, UN, UNESCO, UNICEF, UNDP WHO. etc, where French is a major language of communication. In addition, Nigeria maintains diplomatic, economic and cultural ties with a large number of Francophone countries around the world. All these factors, together with the Federal Government policy declaration in 1998 that gives French the status of a second official language in Nigeria, make the teaching and learning of French desirable. The ability of Nigerians to read and write French will ensure closer cooperation between Nigeria and the Francophone world.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES
The Department of French aims at producing students with a sound knowledge of French, a working knowledge and competence in another European language such as German. It also aims at familiarizing some proficiency students with the cultures and civilizations of the people whose languages are taught in the Department. This will enable them to serve the country in various capacities. In addition, the Department aims at providing basic proficiency/diploma courses to colleagues in other departments/units of the University as well as to workers in other fields who may desire such foreign language competence proficiency.

Thus, the programme is expected to :

i) expose students to various aspects of French language, literature, culture and civilization with a view to helping them achieve greater competence and sophistication in their understanding and appreciation of the values inherent in those aspects ;

ii) train students to be able to apply their knowledge for the advancement of their society ;

iii) equip students to meet the challenges of modern Nigeria in terms of self-employment generation or to take up paid jobs in the public or private sectors of the economy as administrators, diplomas, personnel officers, international broadcasters, teachers, etc. ;

iv) equip students with foreign language ability required for awareness and general international interactions ;

v) prepare students for further studies and research in French.

Admission Requirements:
Candidates seeking admission into B.A. French Programme should pass the following basic requirements:
1. For O/L, the new requirements will be: English Language, Mathematics and any other three (3) Arts, Science or Social Science subjects.
2. For UTME, the requirements will be: English Language and any other three (3) Arts, Science or Social Science subjects.
3. For A/L, the requirements will remain at least 2 A/L passes including French and one other Arts of Social science subjects. This is applicable for NCE and OND in French, IJMB, JUPEB, GCE A/L and Baccalaureat.

Waiver: “O” Level French may not be necessary for admission through UTME.

However, such candidates (iii & iv), if admitted, must provide evidence of having passed DELF, DALF or GCE O’Level French with at least a Credit Pass before graduation.

We believe this will also help curb the problem of dearth of students in the Department without affecting the quality of students produced.

Duration of Programme

To be eligible for the award of a degree, a student must obtain a total of 120 Credits in a 4 year degree programme, 90 Credits in a 3-year degree programme. These must include those in compulsory and required courses.

2. Direct Entry

Candidates must, in addition to the above, possess any of the following:

i) Two (2) ‘A’ level passes in GCE/IJMB or equivalent to include French and any other one subject from Arts/Social Sciences.

ii) NCE with French as a major subject and any other one subject from Arts/Social Sciences.

iii) Diploma at merit level from a recognized tertiary institution with French as a principal subject.

NAMES OF LECTURERS
Afsat Sanni-Suleiman B.A. (Ife); PGDE, M.A. (Ibadan); Ph.D. (Ilorin)
Senior Lecturer & Ag. HOD
I. Bariki B.A. (Ife); PGDE (Ilorin), M.A. (Ibadan); Ph.D. (Ilorin)
Professor
A. M. Ilupeju B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Lagos)
Professor
Marry O. Esere B.Ed. (Calabar), M.A. (Ilorin), Ph.D. (Ilorin)
Professor
A. Salawu B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Ibadan)
Professor
Y. O. Tijani B.A. (Ife), M.A. (Niamey); Ph.D. (Ilorin)
Senior Lecturer
Foluke O. Siwoku-Awi B.A. (Ife), M.A. (Ibadan); Ph.D. (Ilorin)
Senior Lecturer
D. A. Gbadegesin B.A. (Ilorin), M.A. (Ibadan); Ph.D. (Ilorin)
Senior Lecturer
K. A. Atilade B.A. (OAU), M.A. (Ibadan); Ph.D. (Ibadan)
Senior Lecturer
O. A. Oyelabi B.A., M.A. (Ilorin)
Lecturer I
Zeinab A. Abudu B.A.(Ife), M.A. (Ilorin)
Lecturer I
I. Abdulmalik B.A., M.A. (Zaria)
Lecturer I
Adelaide K. Dongmo B.A.,M.A. (Ilorin)
Lecturer I
B. Isa B.A.,M.A. (Ilorin)
Lecturer II
G. I. Oguike B.A.,M.A. (Ilorin)
Lecturer II
Temitope F. Popoola B.A.,M.A. (Ife)
Assistant Lecturer

Non-Academic Staff
Name of Staff Rank/Designation/Salary scale and Date of First Appointment Qualification and Dates obtained
Mrs. F.T. Opadere Ag. Sec./Chief Sec. Assist.
CONTISS 08
22-4-1996 N.C.E. 1994, B.A.(2005) , M.A. (2012) Unilorin
Mrs. E.T. Otiki Higher Executive Officer
CONTISS 07
23-03-2015 HND 2011
Mrs. A. O. Ajidagba Clerical Officer
CONTISS 3
18-7-2013 Sec. Sch. Certificate

Mr. B.S. Fatigun Caretaker
10-4-1996
CONTISS 4 Leaving Sch. Cert.

Names of Successive Heads of Department
1. Dr. Baa Mensa 2004 -2005
2. Prof. M. N. Nnoruka 2005 – 2009
3. Prof. Tunde Ajiboye 2009 – 2012
4. Prof. Isaiah Bariki 2012 – 2014
5. Dr. Bukoye Arowolo 2014 – 2014
6. Dr. (Mrs.) Afsat Sanni-Suleiman 2014 – 2015
7. Prof. Isaiah Bariki 2015 – 2018
8. Dr. Y. O. Tijani 2018 – 2020
9. Dr. (Mrs.) Afsat Sanni-Suleiman 2020 – to date
100 LEVEL
HARMATTAN SEMESTER ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO.OF CREDITS STATUS
FRE 141 French Sounds and Orthography 3 C
FRE 143 Reading in French 3 E
FRE 145 Fundamentals of French Grammar I 2 C
FRE 147 Aspects of French Culture 3 E
FRE 140 Writing in French 3 E
FRE 142 Oral French 2 C
FRE 144 French Composition 3 E
FRE 146 Fundamentals of French Grammar II 2 C
FRE 148 Francophone Countries of W/Africa 3 E

HAMATTAN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO. OF CREDITS STATUS
FRE 115 Laboratory Work 2 C
FRE117 Corrective Grammar I 2 C
FRE 119 Extensive Reading of Prescribed Texts I 2 C
FRE 127 Introduction to Composition Writing in French 2 C
FRE 129 French Conversation I 2 C
GNS 111 Use of English 2 R

RAIN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO. OF CREDITS STATUS
FRE116 French Phonetics 2 C
FRE118 Corrective Grammar II 2 C
FRE126 Extensive Reading of Prescribed Texts II 2 C
FRE128 Composition Writing in French II 2 C
FRE 130 French Conversation II 2 C
FRE 132 Topics in French civilization 2 E
GNS 112 Use of English II 2 R

200 LEVEL
HARMATTAN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO. OF CREDITS STATUS
FRE 229 French Grammatical Structures 3 C
FRE 231 Studies in Aural & Written Comprehension 3 C
FRE 233 Introd. to Lit. Written in French 3 C
FRE 235 Critical Appreciation of Literature 2 E
FRE 237 Introduction to French Drama 2 E
FRE 239 Introduction to Translation 2 E
GRM 223 Introduction to German 2 R
GNS 211 Philosophy, Logic and Nig. Culture 2 R

RAIN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO. OF CREDITS STATUS
FRE 230 Introd. to French Phonetics & Phonology 3 C
FRE 232 Adv. Studies in Oral & Written Comp. 3 C
FRE 234 Survey of Fre. Lit. 16th & 17 Centuries 3 C
FRE 236 Introd. To Cult. & Civil. of Francophone Africa 2 E
FRE 238 Introduction to French Poetry 2 E
FRE 240 Theory & Practice of Translation 2 E
FRE 242 Advanced Composition written in French 2 R
GRM 224 Proficiency Course in German II 2 C
GNS 212 Introd. to Social Science & Citizenship Educ. 2 R

300 LEVEL
HAMARTTAN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO. OF CREDITS STATUS
FRE 303 Oral French I 3 C
FRE 305 Practical Translation I 2 E
FRE 307 Adv. Studies in French Lang. Structure I 2 C
FRE 309 Adv. Studies in Fr. Phonetics I 2 C
FRE 329 Cult. & Civil. Of France 2 E
FRE 331 Trends in African Lit. Written in French 2 E
FRE 333 18th Century French Literature 2 E
FRE 335 Communication Skills in French 2 C
GRM 337 Advanced Studies in German 2 E
GNS 311 History & Philosophy of Science 2 R
GSE 301 Graduate Entrepreneurships 2 R

RAIN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO. OF CREDITS STATUS
FRE 304 Oral French II 3 C
FRE 306 Practical Translation II 2 E
FRE 308 Adv. Studies in French Lang.Structure II 2 C
FRE 328 Adv. Studies in Fr. Phonetics II 2 C
FRE 330 Introd. to Basic Prose 2 E
FRE 332 Cult. & Civil. of Francophone Africa 2 E
FRE 334 Literature & Philosophy 2 E
FRE 336 Introduction to Research 2 R
GRM338 Social and Political institutions in Germany 2 E
GNS 312 Digital Skill Acquistion 1 R

400 LEVEL
HAMARTTAN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO. OF CREDITS STATUS
FRE 429 Ling. Applied to the Teaching of French Lang. I 2 C
FRE 431 Advanced Translation I 2 E
FRE 433 19th Cent. French Literature 2 C
FRE 435 Caribbean Francophone Lit. 2 E
FRE 437 African Oral Literature 2 E
FRE 439 Cult. & Civil. Of Francophone Comms. of Maghreb, Europe & America 2 E
FRE 441 Study of Lit. in Translation 2 E
FRE 443 Adv. Communication Skills in French 2 C
FRE 445 Creative Writing in Practice 2 E

RAIN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE NO. OF CREDITS STATUS
FRE 430 Ling. Applied to the Teaching of French Lang. II 2 E
FRE 432 Advanced Translation II 2 E
FRE 434 20th Cent. French Literature 2 C
FRE 436 Contemporary African Literature in French 2 C
FRE 438 Literary Criticism in French 2 E
FRE 440 Background Studies of Francophone Africa 2 E
FRE 442 French Morpho-Syntax 2 E
FRE 499 Research Project 4 C

COURSES DESCRIPTION

For French Minor without O/Level French or its equivalents
(Absolute Beginners)

FRE 140 Writing in French 3 Credits
Exploitation of the resources of French sounds and orthography to practice how to write correctly in French. Special features: capital letters, small letters and punctuation marks in French. (For French minor student only with O/L French or its equivalent). 45h (T) ; E
FRE 141 French Sounds and Orthography 3 Credits
Basic network of rules that govern the relationship between French sounds and French orthography. (For French Minor without O/Level French or its equivalents) 45h (T); E
FRE 142 Oral French 2 Credits
Skills involved in pronunciation and articulation of French sounds both in isolation and in connected speech. To be based on simple dialogues set in clear social contexts. (For French Minor without O/Level French or its equivalents). 15h (T), 45h (P); E
FRE 143 Reading in French 3 Credits
Developing competence in reading French in limited connected stretches: polysyllabic words, short phrases and sentences. Emphasis on pronunciation, fluency and intonation. (For French Minor without O/Level French or its equivalents). 45h (T); E
FRE 144 French Composition 3 Credits
Writing short composition using elementary techniques of self-expression: exaggeration, comparison, assertion, denial, hypothesis, interrogation, exclamation, etc. (For French Minor without O/Level French or its equivalents) 45h (T); E
FRE 145 Fundamentals of French Grammar I 2 Credits
Basic connections between French words and the rules governing them. Identification and use of different features: noun, verb, pronoun, subject, object etc. (For French Minor without O/Level French or its equivalents) 30h (T); C

FRE 146 Fundamentals of French Grammar II 2 Credits
Application of the basic rules and principles that make for acceptance in French. (For French Minor without O/Level French or its equivalents). 30h (T); C
FRE 147 Aspects of French Culture 3 Credits
Major characteristic features of French life and culture: family structure, food, cooking, leisure and sports, and implications for students’ immediate society. (For French Minor without O/Level French or its equivalents) 45h (T)
FRE 148 Francophone Countries of West Africa 3 Credits
Francophone countries of West Africa, history, Identification socio-political institutions, languages spoken and key linkages with France.
100 LEVEL
FRE 115 Laboratory Work 2 Credits
Basic network of rules governing the relationship between French sounds, and French orthography through listening comprehension exercises and dictation. Acquisition of good French through systematic repetition and audition of phonic and grammatical patterns in the language laboratory. Acquisition of speech automatism. 15h (T); 45h (P); C

FRE 117 Corrective Grammar I 2 Credits
Basic French structures through communicative approach. Recognition, comprehension and use of simple French structures in writing and speech. Identification of problems of interference between English and French (structures, spellings, etc). 15h (T); 45h (P); C

FRE 119 Extensive Reading of Prescribed Texts I 2 Credits
Extensive reading using simple prescribed texts e.g. “Français Facile” series. Highlight of structures of texts: plot, theme, characters, grammar and vocabulary in texts. 15h (T); 45h (P); C

FRE 127 Introduction to Composition Writing in French 2 Credits
Basic skills in written French with emphasis on narrative and descriptive forms with a view to enhancing imaginative skills and personal intuition. A few illustrated texts to be used. 15h (T); 45h (P) C

FRE 129 French Conversation I 2 Credits
Emphasis on the use of French and Francophone documents such as songs and short plays. 15h (T); 45h (P); C

FRE 116 French Phonetics 2 Credits
Pronunciation of French words linked to their written version. Focus on French sounds (both vowels and consonants). Each sound to be associated with its version in the written code. Acquisition of good pronunciation e.g. /ε/ and its written versions e.g. “in” as in (linge), “im” as in (impoli), “ein” as in (sein), “aim” as in (essaim) and “ain” as in (soudain), etc.
15h (T);45h (P); C

FRE 118 Corrective Grammar II
Characteristics of the separate units constituting elements of sentence structures: les phrases simples, les forms négative, interrogative, exclamative, les compléments, les temps verbaux, prépositions, pronoms, le gérondif, adjectives et expressions, les circonstants (e.g. toujours).
15h (T); 45h (P); C

FRE 126 Extensive Reading of Prescribed Texts II 2 Credits
Acquisition of speed in reading without losing focus of meaning. Evaluation and analysis of texts. Summary of texts. 15h (T); 45h (P); E

FRE 128 Composition Writing in French II 2 Credits
Improvement on various skills and techniques of composition writing in French. Use of correct and appropriate words and expressions and correct grammar. Emphasis on the classical phases of essay – writing: introduction, development and conclusion. 15h (T);45h (P); C

FRE 130 French Conversation II 2 Credits
Increased lexical acquisition and fluency in spoken French.
15h (T); 45h (p); C

FRE 132 Topics in French Civilisation 2 Credits
History of France as cradle of French civilization. Geographical presentation. Politics in France. French system of education, social and family life in France. 39/0h (T); E

200 LEVEL
FRE 229 French Grammatical Structures 3 Credits
Indepth study of French grammar with emphasis on parts of speech or grammartical categories through the communicative approach.
30h (T); 45h (P); C

FRE 230 Introduction to French Phonetics and Phonology 3 Credits
Systematic description of French sounds at phonetic and phonological levels. Characteristic features of the French sounds. Classification of these sounds with vowels and consonants. Grouping of phonemes according to common articulatory processes: /p/ & /b/, /m/ & /n/, /f/ & /v/, etc. Other French language phenomena: liaison, elision, and enchainement.
30h (T);45h (P); C

FRE 231 Studies in Oral and Written Comprehension 3 Credits
Techniques of listening and understanding in oral French. Techniques of reading and understanding in French. Kinds of text: poems, playlets, songs, etc. Registers. (Simple texts to be used). 30h (T); 45h (P); C

FRE 232 Advanced Studies in Oral and Written Comprehension 2 Credits
Building-up vocabulary through listening to and reading French texts. Text analysis. Grammatical features of texts and their meanings. (Simple texts to be used). 30h (T); 45h (P); C

FRE 233 Introduction to Literature Written in French 2 Credits
Literary genres. Major literary movements in France: classical and romantic. Literary developments in Francophone Africa: oral and written literatures. 45h (P); C

FRE 234 Survey of French Literature 16th & 17th Centuries 2 Credits
Major trends of the French literary history. Introduction to the theory and practice of literary schools such as “la Renaissance”, “la Pleiade”, Classicism”, etc. 45h (P); C

FRE 235 Critical Appreciation of Literature 2 Credits
Introduction to the study of literary designed to expose students to the practice of literary appreciation and its written expression: “l’ explication de texte”, resume de texte”,”l’ analyse littéraire” and “le commentaire du texte”. 30h (T); E

FRE 236 Introd. to the Culture and Civilisation of Francophone Africa 2 Credits
Definitions of culture and civilization. Brief historical study of Francophone countries of Africa. Civilization and influence of France on Francophone African countries. Francophone African countries, their capitals presidents, etc. Social, economic and cultural life of Francophone African countries with emphasis on Nigeria’s French speaking neighbours.
30h (T); E

FRE 237 Introduction to French Drama 2 Credits
Study of selected French and Francophone plays, with emphasis on various aspects of drama (theory, artistic elements, themes, forms.

FRE 238 Introduction to French Poetry 2 Credits
Introduction to the development of French poetry from the Middle Age to modern times. Definition and characteristics of major themes. Extracts from the works of French and Francophones poets: François Villon, Ronsard, La Fontaine, Boileau, Racine, André Chénier, Victor Hugo, André Breton, David Diop and Léon-Gontran Damas. 30h (T); E

FRE 239 Introduction to Translation 2 Credits
Definition of translation. Purposes of translation. Criteria for good translation. Properties of a translated text. “Stand-alone” sentences to be translated from wither language with a view to highlighting the similarities and dissimilarities between both languages. 15h (T); 45h (P); E

GRM 223 Introduction to German 2 Credits
Based on the study of German, the selected second foreign language, students will study texts illustrating some of the main current literary movements in German. 15h (T); 45h (P);R

GRM 224 Proficiency Course in German II 2 Credits
Increase the span of students’ grasp of German. Development of communicative competence through simple German texts, songs and short plays. 15h (T); 45h (P); R

FRE 240 Theory and Practice of Translation 2 Credits
Basic theories and practice of translation using simple texts in English and French. 15h (T); 45h (P); E

FRE 242 Advanced Composition Written in French 2 Credits
In-depth study of complex forms of composition writing, exposition, argumentation, etc. Increased variety of registers of written French. Developing of personal imagination and originality of thought.
15h (T); 45h (P); E

300 LEVEL

FRE 303 Oral French I 3 Credits
Emphasis on ability to sustain oral discussion/conversation in French. Discussion of relevant topics on immediate environment, Nigeria and Africa. (Various French TV programmes to be used). 15h (T); 90 (P); C.

FRE 304 Oral French II 2 Credits
Emphasis on oral fluency on various topics. Reading and listening to recorded audio and video cassettes. Making students record their own version of some extracts at home. General debates and comments on local and foreign political issues. 15h (T); 90 (P); C

FRE 305 Practical Translation I 3 Credits
Translation as a product and process. Translation and interpretation. Langue source/Langue de départ and Langue cible Langue d’arrivée. Translation of different texts of varying styles, lengths and thematic preoccupations. Simple texts to be used. 15h (T); 45h (P); E

FRE 306 Practical Translation II 2 Credits
Use of translators documentary tools: monolingual and bilingual dictionaries, glossaries on various themes and disciplines. Practical translation of various texts; letters, short stories, etc. Extracts from simple texts on law, politics, sports, education, business and literature. Emphasis on various language registers, le mot juste, correct grammar and intended connotation. 15h (T);45h(P); E

FRE 307 Advanced Studies in French Language Structures I 3 Credits
Developing fluency and understanding of the French language through intensive exercises in the production and comprehension of complex sentence patterns. Extracts to be read and various different constructions of sentences to be studied parts of speech (nom, verbe, adjective, etc.) “Phrases simples”, “phrases composes” and “phrases complexes”.
15h (T); 45h (P0; C.

FRE 308 Advanced Studies in French Language Structures II 2 Credits
Examination of the French language. Different types of sentences. French clauses. Structure of French sentences. Various types of verbs and their complements. Study of various sentence patterns through extracts.
15h (T);45h (p); C

FRE 309 Advanced Studies in French Phonetics I 2 Credits
The relationship between sounds and speech. Production of speech sounds. Phonetic transcription versus phonemic transcription, from sound to writing. Phonetic transcription. Perception and training in reception of French sounds and their environments. 15h (T); 45h (P); C

FRE 329 Culture and Civilisation of France 2 Credits
France before 1789 and after. Social life in modern France: population, economy and employment. French arts, science and technology. France and Francophonie. 30h (T); E

FRE 331 Trends in African Literature Written in French 2 Credits
Major literary works selected from colonial and post-colonial periods. Negritude movement as illustrated, for example, in the poems of Léopold Sédar Senghor and/or David Diop. Post-colonial literature as illustrated by African authors. 30h (T); E

FRE 333 18th Century French Literature 2 Credits
Study of the landmarks of 18th Century French Literature L’Encyclopédie: history, structure, characteristics, main ideas and major contributors. Authors to be studied: Diderot, Voltaire, Beaumarchais, Montesquieu, Marivaux, Rousseau, etc. 30h (T) E

FRE 335 Communication Skills in French 2 Credits
“Ground rules” for effective communication in French. Communicative strategies and their theoretical effects on the audience. 15h (T); 45h (P); C

GRM 337 Advanced Studies in German 2 Credits
Detailed study of the structure of German in terms of its grammatical formations and lexical expansion techniques. 30h (T); E

GRM 338 Social & Political Institutions in Germany 2 Credits
Major institutions characterizing the social, political and educational profile of Germany today: family life, political structure, party politics and levels of education, etc. 30h (T); E

FRE 328 Advanced Studies in French Phonetics II 2 Credits
Constituents of rhythm: syllables, groups and pauses. Accentuation and rhythm. Melody and intonation. The rule of “e caduc”. Liaison and enchainement: forms and functions. 15h (T); 45h (P); C

FRE 330 Introduction to Basic Prose
Study of selected French and Francophone prose fiction. Introduction to the form and content of prose, its main features and its aesthetic elements.
30h (T); E

FRE 332 Culture and Civilisation of Francophone Africa 2 Credits
Familiarisation with French-speaking African communities through the study of their historical and social realities: policy of assimilation, post-independence Francophone Africa, various types of governments (civilian and military) and problems of the modern era. 30h (T); E

FRE 334 Literature and Philosophy 2 Credits
Initiation to the primal relationship between literature and philosophy, and the basic philosophical concepts in literature. Study of French philosophical thoughts as exemplified in literary texts written by philosophers. Selected literary works written by known philosophers to illustrate their thoughts. Literary works of philosophers: Voltaire, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, etc. 30h (T); E

FRE 336 Introduction to Research 2 Credits
Principles and methodology of research from research. Documentation of research findings. 30h (T); R

400 LEVEL
FRE 429 Linguistics Applied to the Teaching to French Language I 2 Credits
Linguistic principles. Demonstration of application of linguistic principles to French language teaching. 15h (T); 45h (P);C

FRE 431 Advanced Translation I 2 Credits
Definition. Types of Translation: interlingual, intralingual, intersemiotic. Servitude and option. Equivalence in theme and version. Translation procedures: literal, borrowing, calque, transposition, modulation, equivalence, adaptation. Practical translation of variety of texts: literary, pragmatic, commercial, religious, educational, technical, medical, etc.
15h (T);45h (P); E

FRE 433 19th Century French Literature 2 Credits
Highlights of French literature of the period. Various genres and literary movements: le pré-romantisme, le romantisme, le parnasse, le realism, le naturalism, le symbolism, etc. Illustrative study of these movements through any of the following authors: Madame de Stael, Chateaubriand, Victor Hugo, Leconte de Lisle, Balzac, Flaubert, Sola, Mallarmé. 30h (T); C

FRE 435 Caribbean Francophone Literature 2 Credits
Introduction to the origin, development and major trends in Caribbean literature of French expression from the Negritude through Antillanite to Créolité using the works of major protagonists such as Aimé Césaire and Eduard Glissant. In-depth study of selected works of some notable writers like Aimé Césaire, Sony Rupaire, Michele Lacrosil, Maryse Condé, Gisele Pineau, Hector Poullet, etc. 30h (T) E

FRE 437 African Oral Literature 2 Credits
Principles and practice of Oral Literature in Francophone Africa. Major oral texts transcribed and translated from African languages into French to be critically examined in the light of established canons. Works to be representative of the traditional African lore not compromised in the process of transcription and translation. 30h (T) C
FRE 439 Culture and Civilisation of Francophone Communities of Maghreb, Europe and America 2 Credits
Social, political and economic life of Francophone Countries of Maghreb, Europe (excluding France) and America. Francophone communities in Maghreb: Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco and Egypt. Francophone communities in Europe: Belgium, Switzerland, Luxembourg and Monaco. Francophone communities in the Americas, Haiti, Canada and U.S.A. 30h(T) E
FRE 441 Literature in Translation 2 Credits
Introduction to works of literary icons translated into French from any other language. Study of their universal aesthetic and thematic significance. Appreciation of the selected works and earlier literary experiences and the universality of the human condition. 30h (T) E
FRE 442 French Morpho-Syntax 2 Credits
Study of major morphological and syntactic characteristics of the French Language. Lexical formation, affixation, sentence constituents and clause categorization. 30h (T); E

FRE 443 Advanced Communication Skills in French 2 Credits
Communication skills in French in terms of its grammatical content. How the French structures behave to convey diverse messages. French language and structural ambiguities. Salient inter-language problems capable of creating ambiguities and false correspondences. Texts of varying themes and structures, presentation of debates, quiz, short plays, etc. to be used. 15(T), 45h(P); C
FRE 445 Creative Writing in Practice 2 Credits
Developing practical skills for writing creatively and imaginatively. A “mini work of arts” e.g. a poem to be studied and to serve as springboard for students’ own “mini – work of art”. 15(T), 45h(P); E
FRE 430 Linguistics applied to the teaching of French Language II 2 Credits
Existing social and linguistic norms that affect French language learning. Emphasis on the distinction between French as a Foreign Language (FLE) and French as wither Mother Tongue (FLM) or Second Language (FLS). Relating French Language learning to the Nigerian environment: intérfence, interlangue, facilitation, etc. 30h (T); E
FRE 432 Advanced translation II 2 Credits
Practical translation of texts of various nature, genres, interest and profession: prose, drama and poetry. Discussion and proposed solutions of translation. Application of theories of translating from French into English and vice versa. Different types of texts: literary, scientific/technical, legal, commercial, cultural educational, etc. Emphasis on specificity of French and English, and extralinguistic factors in translation. 15(T), 45h(P); E

FRE 436 Contemporary African Literature in French 2 Credits
Overview of the development of African Literature of French expression from the Negritude to the Post-colonial period touching on all genres. In-depth study of selected works of contemporary authors with at least two main genres to exemplify the contemporary post-colonial literary trends.
30h (T); C
FRE 438 Literary Criticism in French 3 Credits
Basic techniques of analyzing, interpreting and appreciating literary works of art. Emphasis on the various structures and forms of the modern approaches to critical analysis and interpretation of literature. 30h (T); E
FRE 440 Background Studies of Francophone Africa 2 Credits
Present sociological realities of Francophone Africa. Ethnic groups of various Francophone countries in Africa. Problems created by the total domination of French language on other local languages. Economic and political factors at play in this part of Africa. Rapport between Francophone and Anglophone Africa. 30h (T); E
FRE 499 Research Project 4 Credits
Each student under the guidance of an approved supervisor is required to conduct research in an approved area by the Department, culminating in the submission of a project. 180h (P); C

SUMMARY

100 Level
Compulsory Courses: FRE 115(2), 116(2), 117(2), 118(2), 119(2), 126(2), 1279(2), 128(2), 129(2), 130(2) = 20 Credits

Required Courses: GNS 111(2), 112(2) = 4 Credits
Elective Courses: At least 6 credits: ENG 101(2), 102(2), 106(2), LIN 101(2), 102 (2), and/or any relevant course from other departments.
= 6 Credits
Total =30 Credits
200 Level
Compulsory Courses: FRE 229(3), 230(3), 231(3), 232(2), 233(2), 234(2), 239(2) = 17 Credits
Required Courses: GRM 223(2), 224(2), GNS 211 (2), 212(2), GSE 202(2) = 10 Credits
Elective Courses: At least 6 credits: FRE 235(2), 236(2), 237 (2), 238 (2), 240 (2) = 6 Credits
Total = 33 credits
300 Level
Compulsory Courses: FRE 303 (3), 304 (2), 307 (2), 302 (2), 309 (2), 328 (2), 335 (2) = 15 Credits
Required Courses: GSE 301(2), GNS 311(2), 312 (1) = 5 Credits
Electives Courses: At least 10 credits: FRE 305 (2), 329 (2), 330 (2), 331 (2), 332 (2), 333(2), 334(2) = 10 Credits
Total = 30
400 Level
Compulsory Courses: FRE 429 (2), 433 (2), 436 (2), 443 (2), 436 (2), 499 (2) = 14 Credits
Required Courses: DLC 400 (2) = 2 Credits
Electives Courses: At least 16 credits: FRE 430 (2), 431 (2), 432 (2), 435 (2), 437 (2), 438 (2), 439 (2), 440 (2), 441 (2), 442(2), 445 (2)
= 16 Credits
Total = 32 Credits
Graduation Requirements:
To be eligible for the award of a degree, a student must pass all prescribed courses including those earned in GNS 111, 112, 211, 212, 311 GSE 301 and DLC 400
Total = UTME - 120 Credits
DE – 95 Credits
Job Opportunities
Teaching
Foreign Service
Translator/Interpreters
Administrators
Protocol Affairs
Bilingual Secretaries
Telecommunication
International Organisation
Ministry of Internal & External Affairs
Journalism/Media
Conferencier

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT
Academic activities commenced in the then Department of History in 1976 now the Department of History and International Studies, following the official opening of the University of Ilorin in 1975, Since then, the Department has taught and graduated history students in spite of the challenge of wavery interest of some critical stakeholders. However, in the light of the tremendous upheavals in the global environment and dramatic changes in world affairs in the recent time, history teaching and learning is regaining its rightful position in societies, particularly Nigeria, where it had suffered a setback. With the re-introduction of history into Nigeria schools’ curriculum by the President Muhammadu Buhari administration, and largely because of the growing need to comprehend the prevailing issues and trends in the International system in a world that has become highly globalised, competitive and interdependent, history has become a very exciting field of study. The Department of History and International Studies, University of Ilorin, is aware of these developments and conscious of the changing patterns and evolution of new trajectories in international politics. It is within this context and in reflecting new waves in historical scholarship that the Department continually modifies its curriculum, employs new methodologies and approaches in the teaching and learning of history, hence the emergency of the under listed courses in the Department programme. The Department which started with five academic staff and 30 students, continued to witness steady expansion in the number of academic staff and students till date. The Department runs undergraduate and postgraduate programme leading to the award of the Bachelor of Arts Degree; Master of Arts Degree and the Doctor of Philosophy Degree. The incumbent Head of Department is Dr. Bashir Olaitan Ibrahim whose areas of specialization is Economic History with special interest in History industrialization.

a. Staff List (Academic)
S/N Name Degree & Intuitions Rank & Position Status Specialisation
1 B. O. Ibrahim B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) Senior Lecturer; Ag. Head Industrial History
2 B. M. Eyinla B. A., M. A. (Ibadan), M.Sc. (Ife), Ph.D. (Ilorin). PGD (ISS) The Hague Professor On Leave of Absence Diplomatic History
3 R. A. Olaoye B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) Professor History of Science and Technology
4 S. O Aghalino B. A (Ed.), (Ekpoma), M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) Professor Economic and Social History (with particular reference to Oil and Gas and Environment)
5 P. F. Adebayo B. A., (Ibadan) M. Sc., (Ife).,Ph.D. (Ilorin) Professor Lebanese and Diaspora Studies
6 I A. Jawondo NCE., (KWACOED, Ilorin)., B. A. (Ed.), (Ilorin), M. A., Ph.D. (UDUS), Cert. in Computer (Ilorin) Professor Mosque and Society, Gender, Peace and Conflict and Development
7 L. E. Odeh B. A. (LASU), M.Sc., Ph.D. (BSU) Reader International Relations
8 A. S. Afolabi B. A. (Ilorin)., M. Sc., Ph.D. (Ibadan) Reader Historical Sources/Archiving
9 Oladiti Abiodun Akeem Reader Sabbatical African Studies
10 A.J. Aboyeji B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) PGDE (Sokoto), Cert. in Computer (ADAPTI) Senior Lecturer Diplomatic History/Intergroup Relations (with particular emphasis on Igbomina Studies)
11 Theresa, N. Odeigah B.A., M. A., (Ilorin), Ph.D. (KSU), PGDE., (Ado-Ekiti), Dip. Bus Adm., (UNICAP). Senior Lecturer Economic History
12 S. O. Aboyeji B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) PGDE (Sokoto), Cert. in Computer (ADAPTI) Lecturer I Cultural Studies (with particular emphasis on Igbomina Studies)
13 M. O. Alabi B. A. (UNIMAID), M. A. (Ilorin) PGDE (UNAD), Ph.D. (Ilorin), Cert. in Computer (ADAPTI) Lecturer I Military Technology
14 R. Onagun NCE., (KWACOED), B. A. (Ed)., M. A. (Ilorin) Lecturer I Medical/Health History
15 S. D. Yusuf B. A., M. A. (Ilorin) Lecturer I Intergroup Relations
16 A.A. Suleiman B. A., M. A., Dip. in Acc. & Data Processing (Ilorin). Lecturer II Intergroup Relations
17 Adeshina, L. B. A., M. A., (Ilorin). Assistant Lecturer
18 Mary. A. Y. Lewu B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) Senior Lecturer Adjunct Gender Studies
19 E. J. Ige B. A., M. A., (Ife) Lecturer I Adjunct Diaspora Studies

20 Lukman Saka B.Sc., M.Sc. (Ibadan), PhD
(Malaysia) Reader Associate (POS) Social Movement
21 Omede, Adedoyin J. B.Sc., M.Sc., PhD (Lagos) Reader Associate (POS) International Relations
22 Ojo, Emmanuel O. B.Sc., M.Sc., PhD Reader Associate (POS) Media History
23 MUHAMMAD, Abdulrasheed Alada B.Sc., M.Sc., PhD
(ABU) Reader Associate (POS) Foreign policy
24 Raji, Shittu A. B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) Reader Associate (CPSS) Peace and Conflict Studies
25 Mbombo, J. K. B. A., M. A., Ph.D. SL Associate (CPSS) Peace and Conflict Studies
26 Saidu Abubakar B.Ed., M.Ed., PhD (Ilorin) SL Associate (Arts Edu.) Education History
27 Raji, A. B.Sc., M.Sc., PhD SL Associate (Sociology) Man and Society
28 Shittu D. B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) Associate (Religions) Religions
29 Olaniyi A. Jubril B. Ed., M. Ed. (Ilorin) LI Associate (Arts Edu.) Education History
30 Animasahun, G. B. A. (Unilag), M. A., Ph.D. (UI), (Ilorin) Peace and Conflict Studies SL Associate (CPSS) Peace and Conflict Studies
31 Jekayinfa O
Jumoke B. Ed., M. Ed., PhD (Ilorin) LI Associate (Arts Edu.) Education History
32 Abdulganiyu
S.S. LI Associate (Arts Edu.) Education History
33 Olookoba I.N. B. Sc., Med.( Ilorin) LII Associate (Sci. Edu.) Science Education
34 Abdulsalam, A. A. B. Sc., M.Sc Ph.D, ( Ilorin) LI Associate (Sci. Edu.) Science Education
35 A.G. Olatunji B. Sc., M.Sc Ph.D ( Ilorin) LI Associate (Sociology)
36 S. J. Akor B. Sc (Jos).,M.Sc Ph.D ( Ilorin) LI Associate (Sociology)
37 M. Issah B. Sc., M.Sc Ph.D (South Africa) LI Associate (Sociology)
38 A. S. Olanrewaju B. Sc.(Jos) M.Sc. Ph.D (U.I) LI Associate (Sociology)
39 T.O. Tejideen Msc. Msc., Ph.D (Ilorin) LI Associate (Sociology)
40 S. Z. Abdulbaqi B. Sc., M.Sc. (Ilorin LI Associate (Sociology)
41 Jimoh, D. I. B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) SL Adjunct (Al-Hikmah) Gender Studies
42 Abejide T.S B. A., M. A. (Ilorin), Ph.D.
(South Africa) SL Adjunct (Al-Hikmah) Economic History
43 Salihu Audu Hadizat B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ilorin) LI Adjunct (KWASU) Transportation Economy
44 Yahaya, Eliasu B. A., M. A.(Ilorin), Ph.D. (Ife) SL Adjunct (KWASU) Islam and Society
45 Ajala, B. Luqman B. A., M. A., Ph.D. (Ibadan) LI Adjunct (Al-Hikmah) Peace and Conflict Studies
46 Oladimeji, Talibu B. A. (OOU), M. A.Ph.D. (Malaysia) SL Adjunct (Al-Hikmah) International Relations
47 Aribidesi, A. Usman B.A., M.A. (Ibadan), Ph.D Visiting

b. Non-Teaching Staff
S/N Name Degree & Institution Rank & Position e-mail address
1 Mrs. R. B. Oluyomi (NECO), Digital Bridge Institute Cert.; SDC IV, III & II, Cert, ASCON Cert. Confidential Secretary II oluyomi.rb@unilorin.edu.ng

2 Mrs. F. T. Adebayo O’ Level (NECO), Diploma in Law Higher Executive Officer adebayo.ft@unilorin.edu.ng

3 Mr. I. S. Akanbi O’ Level (NECO), NCE Asst. Executive Officer Saliu.ia@unilorin.edu.ng

4 Mr. I. S. Akanbi O’ Level (NECO), NCE Asst. Executive Officer Saliu.ia@unilorin.edu.ng

Philosophy of the Department on the Programme
The philosophy of the Department for designing this programme is to widen students’ experience and develop their qualities of perception and judgement. Arousing in the students, a sense of the past, an awareness of the development of differing values, systems and societies and the inculcation of critical yet tolerant personal attitudes. To make students understand and acknowledge the reciprocal relationship of History and International Studies as a discipline with other disciplines and the importance of such influence on their experience of the subject.
Objectives of the Degree Programme
Using many historical methods of analysis, complemented with developed research methods of the social sciences, the programme is specifically designed to:
i) train and produce well-grounded graduates with advanced knowledge in History and International Studies;
ii) provide intensive training for the understanding of world history from afro-centric perspective;
iii) teach the rudiments of diplomatic history and diplomatic etiquette;
iv) produce graduates who can become self-employed and employment generators;
v) produce graduates who will be able to fit comfortably into a globalised society;
vi) give students a thorough understanding of Nigerian history and historiography planted firmly in the context of African history and historiography;
vii) educate students on historical movements of global importance from other continents to enable them acquire better knowledge of the world and thus promote world peace;
viii) make students comprehend the historical forces and developments which have shaped and are still shaping the lives of the peoples of Nigeria, Africa and the world entirely;
ix) develop a sense of commitment and capacity to consciously relate to these forces and developments in such a way that Nigerian and African unity, independence and prosperity can be achieved; and
x) provide the students with advantages usually associated with historical training, viz: critical and analytical faculty and balanced judgement needed particularly in administrative and managerial responsibilities.

Note: To achieve these objectives, history teachers should draw on the expertise of relevant disciplines in the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences to explain the historical forces and developments with which they deal.
ADMISSIONS AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

B.A. History and International Studies
COURSE
ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

DIRECT
ENTRY U.T.M.E. U.T.M.E.
SUBJECTS SPECIAL CONSIDERATION (WAIVERS)
REMARKS
HISTORY & INTERNATIONAL STUDIES a. Two A’ Level passes which must include History or Government and any other one Art or Social Science subject.
b. NCE with History or Government/Political Science and any other one Arts/Social Science subject with a minimum of merit pass; and
c. Diploma in Law, Public Administration, Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies from an accredited government tertiary institution with at least merit pass. Five O’ Level Credits passes in GSE, SSE, NECO or its equivalent, to include English language, History/Government/Civic Education and three other Arts or Social Science subjects.
UTME subjects: English, History/Government/Civic Education and any two other Arts/Social Science subjects.

The degree programme has 4-year (8 Semester) duration in the case of SSCE holders and lasts 3-years (6 Semesters) for those who enter with ‘A’ level qualifications or equivalents.
Students are required to register for a minimum of 30 credits and a maximum of 48 credits per session. Students are at liberty to register for their elective courses from within the Faculty of Arts or other faculties within the humanity cluster.

B.A. HISTORY AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PROGRAMME
Course Contents and Descriptions
100 LEVEL COURSES (HARMATTAN SEMESTER)
COURSE CODES CREDIT/ STATUS TITLE COURSE DESCRIPTION
HIS 101 3 C Nigeria from 1500 to 1800 Historical developments from about 1500 AD to 1800 AD. State formation and inter-group relations politics religion, economy and socio-cultural activities.
HIS 109 3 E Europe to the Age of Revolution A survey of European history highlighting fundamental developments such as the early economic and social institutions, Feudalism, the Renaissance, Reformation in the Christian Church, the Age of Discoveries, Mercantilism, the new scientific views of the world, the Age of Enlightenment, the American and French Revolutions and Industrial Revolutions.
HIS 111 3 E Outline History of Africa from 1500–1800 A.D. The course examines the old empires and kingdoms that existed during this period in the Western Sudan, west Africa, North Africa, East Africa and Southern Africa; and the significance of trans-Saharan and post-trans-Saharan contact and impact on the people.
HIS 123 3 C Introduction to History and International Studies Fundamental interpretations of the nature of history, sources, schools and traditions of historical scholarship. Definitions of foreign policy, theories, principles and practice of foreign/international relations.
HIS 125 3 C Economic History of West Africa up to the 20th Century Major economic developments and activities in the West African region in the 19th centuries, highlighting the motivating factors of demand and supply from within, and the external factors engendered by the Europeans penetration of West Africa and the industrial revolution in Europe.
HIS 127 3 C Introduction to Archaeology Archaeology; its meaning, development and methods. General principles and techniques of the discipline. The relevance of inter-disciplinary approach to the study of history. Reconnaissance, excavation, artifact study and museum. Case studies sites including Nok, Benin, Oyo and Igbo-Ukwu to be examined.
100 LEVEL COURSES (RAIN SEMESTER)
COURSE CODES CREDIT/ STATUS TITLE COURSE DESCRIPTION
HIS 104 3 C North Africa from the first Arab Conquest of Egypt to the coming of the Europeans Egypt and the beginnings of civilization. Occupation by foreign powers including Libya, Greeks and Romans, with emphasis on Egypt and the Nile Valley. Spread of Islam in North African States, and relationship with West Africa.
HIS 108 3 E Major World Civilizations A general survey of some major civilizations and some of their contribution to historical developments. E.g. the Egyptians, the Arabs, the Greeks, the Romans, the Chinese and the Europeans.
HIS 110 3 E Blacks in Diaspora A study of the Black communities found outside their home lands. Factors responsible for their dispersal and their roles in contemporary world affairs.
HIS 122 3 C Elements diplomacy and Strategic Studies Historical origin of diplomacy, its meaning as well as classifications of Diplomats and consuls. The duties and functions of diplomatic and consular personnel, establishment and determination of diplomatic relations, diplomatic privileges and immunities. The concept of policy and strategic studies, elements and types of strategy.
HIS 126 3 C Religions in West Africa The origin of Africa Traditional Religion and the advent of Islam and Christianity in West Africa. The stages of development of Islam and Christianity in West Africa. The influence and impact of the religion on socio-political and economic activities of West African States.
HIS 128 3 C Diplomatic Relations in West Africa up to 1900 A.D Foreign relations of pre-colonial West Africa states. The role of West African leaders, Arabs, missionaries and traders in the establishment and nurturing of these relations and the consequences for inter-state relations.

200 LEVEL COURSES (HARMATTAN SEMESTER)
COURSE CODES CREDIT/STATUS TITLE COURSE DESCRIPTION
HIS 201 3 C The Nigerian Region, 1800-1900 AD Major developments, including internal and external factors, which brought the Nigerian communities into a nation state.
HIS 203 2 E History of Southern Africa from 1652-1912
A survey of internal developments in the southern Africa region and internal factor of the Europeans as adventures/explorers settlers, miners and rulers up to 1912.
HIS 205 3 C History of the U.S.A since 1877 A.D A Survey of historical developments including the background of colonial America. The war for independence, the Civil War, reconstruction. Industrialization, migrations. The emergence of America as a world power. America in world affairs as influenced by internal and external factors and developments
HIS 207 3 C Africa and European Imperialism Internal and external factors and developments which created the setting in Europe and Africa for European imperialism and its impact on Africa and the world.
HIS 209 3 E History of the Ottoman Empire and North Africa Since 1590 History of North Africa and Ottoman Empire since the 16th century using the fall of Constantinople as a background. Highlight of subsequent development of Ottoman Turkey in international relation to the treaty of Kutchuk Kinarji 1774, Crimean war, 1853-1856, the crises of the Young Turks, 1908, the Balkan wars 1911-1913 and the First World War, 1914-1918.
HIS 221 3 C Philosophy of History and International Studies Nature of history and international relations, their development as academic disciplines and their relevance to the society.

200 LEVEL COURSES (RAIN SEMESTER)
COURSE CODES CREDIT/ STATUS TITLE COURSE DESCRIPTION
HIS 204 3 C History of Latin America from 15th Century to the 20th C Early empires and civilizations. Incas and the Aztecs (Peru and Mexico), contact with Europe from the times explorations. Spanish and other colonialists. Struggle for independence including the railway boom and foreign factors. Development after independence, the French adventure, the 20th century problems of governance in the area; revolutions and instability.
HIS 206 3 C History of Russia in the 19th Century Historical developments in Russia history: Russia under Alexander 1; Russia and Ottoman Empire up to the Crimean War of 1853 to 1856 and the effects of the war serfdom and Emancipation of 1861 under Tsar Alexander II. Growth of the press and universities and the emergence of a critical intelligentsia and revolutionary Marxism and industrialization in the late 19th century.
HIS 208 3 C History of East & Central Africa since 1800 A.D. State formation and consolidation in this region analyzing the internal and external factors of warfare, conquest and trade. Arab and European imperialism; independence movements, regional organisations and the struggle for survival.
HIS 210 3 E Europe from the French Revolution to the 2nd World War Impact of French revolution on Europe and the subsequent development leading to the 2nd World War and the inter-war years and the Second World War and their impact.
HIS 212 3 E Foundation of African Culture and Civilization A comprehensive study of man, his culture and technology in Africa and of the changes that have taken place to produce the “classical” cultures of African peoples.
HIS 222 3 C International Political Systems Establishment, evolution and nature of the contemporary political systems. Scope and major trajectories of the various issues in the international agenda.

300 LEVEL COURSES (HARMATTAN SEMESTER)
COURSE CODES CREDIT/ STATUS TITLE COURSE DESCRIPTION
HIS 307 3 C History of the Commonwealth Process, arguments and activities by which the old British Empire ruled from Whitehall and transformed into a Commonwealth of independent and friendly nations. Imperial Federation idea, Colonial conferences of 1897, 1902, 1887, 1911, the First World War and its effects, imperial conferences of 1917, 1921, 1923, 1926 and the Balfour declaration. Imperial conferences of the 1930s, World War II and its effects, and the decolonization process. The modern Commonwealth of Nations.
HIS 321 3 C Nigeria since 1914 Colonial Nigeria and her experience as a dependency, especially during the period of depression, nationalism and development of political institutions; contemporary Nigerian history.
HIS 323 3 C History of Southern Africa since 1912 Developments in Southern Africa in the 20th century. The defeat of local resistance and the introduction of the Portuguese rule in Angola and Mozambique, extension of the British South African company (BSAC), the creation of the native affairs development in Angola, termination of German rule in Namibia, formation of African National Congress, institutionalization of apartheid policy in South Africa, domestic and international oppositions to apartheid, Nationalists struggle against white minority regimes and for independence in the various southern Africa States. Post-independence developments in the Southern African States.
HIS 325 3 E History of Latin America since 1898
Nature of the struggles for independence; the attainment of independence and post colonial problems associated with socio-economic and political developments in the various Latin American states.
HIS 327 3 C International Politics since 1945 The major world wars – First and second, the crises in Vietnam, the Middle East, Angola and Southern Africa, the emergence of the World super-powers, the cold war and threat to peace. Efforts to resolve world crises through international organizations- NATO and the Warsaw Pact. The development of dangerous weapons, poverty in the Third World countries.
HIS 329 2 C Field Trip Field trip to governmental, quasi-governmental and non-governmental institutions as well as historical sites, to gain firsthand experience in policy formulation, analysis and implementation as well as practical historical knowledge. Each student is required to submit a field trip report.
HIS 331 3 E History of the U. S. A. since 1945 Economic development in the U.S.A. Issues of slavery, the Civil War, reconstruction after 1865 and industrialization in the 19th Century.

300 LEVEL COURSES (RAIN SEMESTER)
COURSE CODES CREDIT/ STATUS TITLE COURSE DESCRIPTION
HIS 322 3 C History Research Method Detailed discussion of available sources of information, the methods of collections, analysis, usage and evaluation of historical data. Practical exposure to the library, the archives, and field work of the collection for oral tradition.
HIS 324 3 C USSR 1917 - 1990 The Russian revolution of 1917, the Civil War, 1919-1920, the roles of social revolutionaries and the formation of USSR, Mensheviks, Lenin and his leadership, Stalin and “Socialism in one Country”, USSR in the second world war and the Cold War. The emergence of the socialist economic bloc and its orientation and characteristic features, the fall of the Berlin wall and the disintegration of the USSR.
HIS 326 3 C The Development of contemporary International Economic System Developments and nature of the international political economy. The theories and concepts of imperialism, hegemony and globalization.
HIS 328 3 C Africa and International Affairs in the 20th Century Political and economic developments within Africa and international relations among African states and the outside world. Efforts of the African States in regional and continental organisations to solve the problems of political instability and continental unity.
HIS 330 3 E Japan Since 1853 Survey of the history of Japan since 1853. Japanese aggression in the Far East and the outbreak of War. Japan war efforts and the activities of the Japanese army during the Second World War, defeat, occupation and emergence as an economic superpower. The role of Japan in contemporary world affairs.
HIS 332 3 E Modern Political Thought Consideration of the works of Plato, Aristotle, Russell, Hobbes, Roseau, Badin, Machiavelli and others and the effect of these works on the nature and evolution of the modern state systems.

400 LEVEL COURSES (HARMATTAN SEMESTER)
COURSE CODES CREDIT/ STATUS TITLE COURSE DESCRIPTION
HIS 403 3 C Economic History of Nigeria in the 20th Century Factors of change and continuity in the patterns of economic activities in Nigeria. Political, economic antecedents and colonial setting. Infrastructural development and the exploitation of agricultural and mineral resources. Manpower needs, training and issues of labour.
HIS 405 3 C Development of Parliamentary Systems
(Britain, French and India) Comparative discussion of parliamentary systems as practiced by Britain, France and India. Common trends and distinguishing differences viewed against the varying historical experiences of the communities involved.
HIS 407 4 C Special Paper Students are to choose any one of the following themes, which are aimed at exposing students to the use of documents to interpret historical development: The Mau-Mau; Evolution of Nigerian Administration; The Atlantic Slave Trade; Power and politics in 19th century Hausa land; Trade and politics in the Middle Niger and lower Benue 1830-1900; Ilorin and its region 1850; Indigenous technology in West Africa since 1850; The struggle for Nigeria’s independence 1945-1960. Africa and European Imperialism 1880-1914; The O.A.U.: A study in the Quest for African Unity 1960-1963; Economic Change in Lagos and its Hinterland 1880-1914; The Nigerian Civil War 1967-1970; Pre-history of the Nigerian region. 60h (T); C
HIS 411 3 E Land and Labour in Africa Land and labour in Africa. Traditional land tenure systems in Africa; patterns of responses to the dynamics of changes occasioned by population explosion and environmental challenges. History of Labour from the stage of self-employment to hired (wages) and organized labour and their Unions and the question of governmental control.
HIS 421 3 C Contemporary Africa Political Thoughts Origins, influence on, and the contents of modern African political thoughts through their selected exponents.
HIS 423 3 C Problems and Prospects of Regional Integration in Africa Regional organizational setup in Africa and the joint efforts of the African States to facilitate economics developments. Problems encountered and the prospects of such efforts.
HIS 499 5 C Project Each student, under the guidance of an approved supervisor is required to conduct research in an area approved by the department, culminating in the submission of a project.

400 LEVEL COURSES (RAIN SEMESTER)
COURSE CODES CREDITS/ STATUS TITLE COURSE DESCRIPTION
HIS 404 3 C OAU and AU: Issues in African International Relations Origins, formation and the role of the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) in intra-African relations. Problems and achievements of the organization. The transformation of the OAU to African Union.
HIS 406 3 C Contemporary History of the Middle East The Palestinian question. Effects of the Second World War and the creation of the state of Israel on the region; the Suez Crises; the Arab-Israeli conflicts; the role of the Super Powers and the efforts at bringing peace to the region.
HIS 410 3 C History of Science and Technology from 1500-1980 Developments, which have taken place in Science and Technology.
HIS 412 3 C Philosophy of History History, its development as a discipline and its relevance to the society.
HIS 422 3 E Africa Government and Politics Politics and governance in selected post-colonial African states. Various approaches in the quest for African Unity. Neocolonialism and globalization of the African economy.
HIS 424 3 C Conduct and Administration of External Relations Conduct and administration of Nigerian Foreign policy from independence to the present. The structure, instruments and machinery of foreign policy making and implementation under the various regimes and the major facets of Nigeria’s external relations.
HIS 426 1 C Themes in History and International Studies Perspectives in history and international affairs based on selected themes such as war, peace, treaties, imperialism, environmental crises, terrorism and globalization.

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
SUMMARY
100 LEVEL
Compulsory Courses: HIS 101 (3), HIS104 (3), HIS122 (3), HIS123 (3), HIS125 (3),HIS126 (3),HIS127 (3), HIS128 (3) = 24 Credits
Departmental Elective Courses: HIS108 (3), HIS109 (3), HIS110 (3), HIS111 (3) = 12 Credits
Required Courses: GNS 111(2), 112(2) = 4 Credits
Elective Courses: At least three (3) Credits from courses offered from other Departments in the Faculty of Arts =3 Credits
TOTAL = 31 Credits
200 LEVEL
Compulsory Courses: HIS 201(3), HIS204 (3), HIS205 (3), HIS 206 (3), HIS207 (3), HIS208 (3), HIS221 (3), HIS222 (3), = 24 Credits
Departmental Elective Courses: HIS203 (2), HIS209 (3), HIS210 (3), HIS212 (3) = 11 Credits
Required Courses: GNS 211(2), 212(2), GSE 202 (2) = 6 Credits
Elective Courses: At least three (3) Credits for courses offered from other Departments in the Faculty of Arts. =3 Credits
TOTAL = 33 Credits
DE: GNS111 (2), 112 (2) = 4 Credits
Total DE = 37 Credits
300 LEVEL
Compulsory Courses: HIS 307(3), HIS321 (3), HIS 322(3), HIS 323 (3), HIS 324(3), HIS 326(3), HIS 327 (3),HIS 328(3), HIS 329(2), = 26 Credits
Departmental Elective Courses: HIS325 (3), HIS330 (3), HIS 331(3), HIS332 (3) =12 Credits
Required Courses: GNS 311(2), GNS 312 (1) GSE 301(3) = 6 Credits
Elective Courses: At leastthree (3) Credits for courses offered from other Departments in the Faculty of Arts. = 3 Credits TOTAL = 35 Credits
400 LEVEL
Compulsory Courses: HIS 403(3), HIS404 (3), HIS405 (3), HIS406 (3), HIS407 (4), HIS 410 (3), HIS412 (3), HIS421 (3), HIS 423 (3), HIS 424 (3), HIS499 (5) = 36 Credits
Elective Courses: HIS411 (3), HIS 422 (3) = 6 Credits
TOTAL = 36 Credits
Graduation Requirements
UTME = 135
DE = 108

DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS AND NIGERIAN LANGUAGES
HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT
The Department of Linguistics and Nigerian Languages was established as one of the foundation departments in the Faculty of Arts in 1976. The department houses four programmes namely: Linguistics, Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba.
The main objective of the Linguistics and Yoruba Programmes is to produce at the end of the stipulated period of study in the University, well trained graduates of Linguistics and Yoruba who have the academic expertise to contribute to the manpower needs of the nation and the global community in the Public and private sectors of economy. Our goal is that our graduates, will not only be able to take jobs in teaching, translation, broadcasting, journalism, publishing houses and the civil service and effectively demonstrate their linguistic and literary skills, they will be able to generate some level of employment for themselves.
The Department was established on a sound academic level by the foundation head of department Professor Oladele Awobuluyi along with other distinguished professors and members of staff. Since then, the staff strength has variously grown and dropped to the present twenty-five lecturers. These staff members are engaged in the teaching of Hausa, Igbo, Yoruba and Linguistics to Undergraduate and Postgraduate students of both disciplines. They also teach the Remedial and Sandwich students.
The Core undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in Yoruba include Yoruba Syntax, Phonology, Yoruba literature - oral and written, culture, Yoruba in broadcasting and advertising and the three genres of drama, prose and poetry while Linguistics programme covers areas such as descriptive, historical, comparative, sociolinguistics, applied Linguistics and so on.
One of the main objectives of the Department is to help train the manpower needed for the successful implementation of the National Policy on Education (NPE), and wish that the other two major indigenous languages in the country be taught and learnt on a large scale outside their individual geographical zone. Hence, the Department, in addition to Yoruba that was one of the foundation programmes in the Department now runs degree programmes in Hausa and Igbo since 2015. It is also the intention of the Department that students that register for a degree in Yoruba be advised to select either Hausa or Igbo as one of their minors and vice versa.

Names of Past HODs to date
Prof. O. Awobuluyi 1979 – Sept. 1984
Prof. B.S. Chumbo Oct. 1984 – Sept. 1986
Prof. OludareOlajubu Oct. 1986 – Feb. 1987
Dr. H.B.C. Capo March 1987 – Feb. 1988
Dr.YiwolaAwoyale March 1988 – Feb. 1990
March 1992 – Feb. 1994
Prof. BisiOgunsina March 1990 – Feb. 1992
March 1998 – May 2001
Dr. Ore Yusuf March 1994 – Feb. 1998
Prof. Y.A. Ajayi March 1996 – Feb. 1998
July 2001 – July 2005
Aug. 2006 – July 2008
Dr. O. Adeyemi Aug. 2005 – July 2006
Aug. 2008 – July 2009
Prof. A.S. Abdussalam Aug. 2009 – July 2015
Dr. I.O. Sanusi Aug. 2015 – July 2017
Dr. H.O. Adeosun Aug. 2017 – July 2019
Dr. K.A. Rafiu Aug. 2019 – July 2021
Dr. J.O. Friday-Otun Aug. 2021 – to date

Programmes
B.A. - Linguistics, Hausa, Igbo, Yoruba
M.A., M.Phil. & - Linguistics, Applied Linguistics,
Ph.D. Yoruba Language, Yoruba Literature

Staff List
Academic Staff
Name Status E-mail address Areas of Specialization
Prof. A.S. Abdussalam Professor abdussalam.as@unilorin.edu.ng
Pedagogical Linguistics, Syntax, Discourse Analysis
Prof. A.G. Fakuade Professor fakuade.ga@unilorin.edu.ng
Sociolinguistics, Applied Linguistics, Discourse Analysis, English Linguistics
Prof. O. Adeyemi Professor lereadeyemi@unilorin.edu.ng
Yoruba Literature
Prof. I.O. Sanusi Professor sanusissa@unilorin.edu.ng
Syntax and Applied Linguistics
Prof. H.O. Adeosun Professor hezekiah@unilorin.edu.ng
Yoruba Literature and Socio-Semiotics
Dr. J.O. Friday-Otun Reader frjoseph@unilorin.edu.ng
Pragmatics and Sociolinguistics
Dr. (Mrs.) B. E. Arokoyo Reader bolakoyoo@unilorin.edu.ng
Psycholinguistics, Syntax, Lexicography
Dr. K.A. Rafiu Reader adewale@unilorin.edu.ng
Phonology and Applied Linguistics
Dr. O.D. Ogunlola Reader layoogunlola@unilorin.edu.ng
Yoruba Literature
Dr. (Mrs.) F.B. Adekeye Senior Lecturer adekeye.bf@unilorin.edu.ng
Yoruba Language, Syntax
S.A.O. Hamzat Senior Lecturer saudat@unilorin.edu.ng
Yoruba Literature
O.T. Okewande Senior Lecturer okewande.ot@unilorin.edu.ng
Yoruba Literature and Language
Dr. C.I. Nnaji Senior Research Fellow nnaji.ci@unilorin.edu.ng
Igbo Language, Linguistics, Communication Arts
S.O.O. Abubakre Lecturer I sooabubakre@unilorin.edu.ng
Applied Linguistics
J.A. Atoyebi Lecturer I adebare@unilorin.edu.ng
Yoruba Oral and Written Literature
O.C. Omolewu Lecturer I omolewu.oc@unilorin.edu.ng
Yoruba Language
F.C. Nwosu Lecturer I nwosu.fc@unilorin.edu.ng
Linguistics and Igbo Language
R.O. Adeyemi Lecturer I adeyemi.ro@unilorin.edu.ng
Yoruba Literature and Culture
M. C. Amaechi Lecturer I amaechi.mc@unilorin.edu.ng
Syntax, Comparative Linguistics
A. Na'Allah Lecturer II naallah.a@unilorin.edu.ng
Hausa Language, Sociolinguistics
S. N. Nwokeji Lecturer II nwokeji.sn@unilorin.edu.ng
Igbo Literature
A.K. Adebayo Lecturer II adebayo.ak@unilorin.edu.ng
Yoruba Literature
C.T. Babatunde Lecturer II babatunde.ct@unilorin.edu.ng
Yoruba Literature
C.C. Eweama Assistant Lecturer eweama.cc@unilorin.edu.ng Linguistics and Igbo Language
A. S. Waziri Assistant Lecturer waziri.as@unilorin.edu.ng
Hausa Language

Non-academic Staff
Name Status E-mail address
L.A. Olaosebikan Chief Sec. Asst. lawrence@unilorin.edu.ng

D.E. Ekemode Higher Executive Officer ekemode.de@unilorin.edu.ng

Modupe.O. Ashaolu Executive Officer ashaolu.mo@unilorin.edu.ng

N.O. Bakare Technologist I bakareno@unilorin.edu.ng

Rebecca.O. Shuaibu Caretaker shuaibu@unilorin.edu.ng

Yemisi Ogungbemi Caretaker ogungbemi.y@unilorin.edu.ng

Level Advisers
B.A. Linguistics
S/No. Name Level
1. Dr. M.C. Amaechi 100
2. Dr. S.O.O. Abubakre 200
3. Mr. A.W. Sambo/Mrs. C.C. Eweama 300
4. Mrs. S.N. Nwokeji 400

B.A. Yoruba
S/No. Name Level
1. Mrs. R.O. Adeyemi 100
2. Mr. J.A. Atoyebi 200
3. Mrs. C.T. Babatunde 300
4. Dr. O.T. Okewande 400
B.A. Hausa
S/No. Name Level
1. Mr. A.W. Sambo 100

B.A. Igbo
S/No. Name Level
1. Miss F.C. Nwosu 100
2. Miss F.C. Nwosu 200

Contact us
Department of Linguistics and Nigerian Languages, Faculty of Arts Building, 1st Floor, Left wing, PMB 1515, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria
Telephone: +2348139395582
Email: linguistics@unilorin.edu.ng
linguistics.unilorin@gmail.com
Website: http://www.arts.unilorin.edu.ng/index.php/2014-03-24-10-50-10/linguistics-and-nigerian-languages

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES
B.A. LINGUISTICS
Objectives of the Programme
The main objective of the Linguistics programme is to produce at the end of the stipulated period of study in the University, well trained graduate of Linguistics who have the academic expertise to contribute to the manpower needs of the nation both in the public and private sectors of economy. The goal is that when they graduate, they will not only be able to take jobs in teaching, translation, broadcasting, journalism, publishing houses and the civil service and effectively demonstrate their linguistic and literary skills, they will be able to create somelevel of employment for themselves. The form of training given in the department thus involves, specified numbers of lecture hours, tutorials, tests and examination for each course. In the final year, the students carry out a project work on a topic of genuine academic interest, and submit 4 copies of the project to the Department. Both final year examinations and projects are thoroughly assessed by reputable linguists, as external examiners. One other major objective of the Department of Linguistics and Nigerian Languages is to train the manpower needed for successfully implementing the laudable objectives of the Nigerian National Language Policy which stipulates that the three major Nigerian Languages, Hausa, Igbo and Yorùbá be taught in all Secondary Schools in Nigeria.

Other objectives are to encourage interested and talented students towards higher degree and research with possible prospects for academic career; to foster research activities among staff of the department through seminars, learned conferences and workshops. Members of the Department belong to academic societies and associations at home and abroad. Notable among these are the Linguistics Association of Nigeria (LAN). Yorùbá Studies Association of Nigeria and West African Linguistic Society. Evidences of qualitative research work done by the staff of the Department are manifested in many articles published in reputable journals as well as books of high linguistic and literary qualities in the field of Linguistics studies.

Philosophy of the Programme
The philosophy of the degree programme in Linguistics is to train students to acquire academic excellence and competence in Linguistics scholarship, and the use of Linguistic principles, through the provision of conducive atmosphere for both staff and students to carry out academic research and development. The (Linguistics) courses are designed to cover the most basic areas of theoretical and applied linguistics and literary studies, so that our students will have a balanced knowledge of linguistics and language related applications. The department offers some courses in linguistics that meet the needs of some other language-based departments like Arabic, English, French, and Arts and Social Science Education.

Admission Requirements
(i) UTME Entry Requirements
Applicants should have 5 O'level credits in GCE/SSCE/NECO/Equivalent to include English language, one other language and three other Arts/Social Science/Science subjects.

(ii) Direct Entry Requirements
(a) Candidates should have at least 5 O’Level Credits including English Language at not more than 2 sittings and at least 2 A'level passes in GCE/IJMB/Equivalent to include a language and any other one Arts/Social Science/Science subject.
(b) NCE with at least one language as a major subject and any other one Arts/Social science subject.
(c) Diploma in Linguistics from an accredited government tertiary institution
(iii) The students who come in through UTME with O/Level qualifications spend four years while those who come in with GCE A/Level/IJMB/NCE/Diploma qualifications spend three years. During the course students receive training, field methods and research experience. They submit type-written projects as part of their final year requirements.
2.1.4 Graduation Requirements
To be eligible for the award of a degree, a student must obtain a total of 120 Credits in a 4-year degree programme, 90 Credits in a 3-year degree programme including those earned in GNS 111, 112, 211, 212, 311 and GSE 301.

2.1.5 Job Opportunities for our Graduates
Job opportunities available for our graduates are as follows:
 Language teaching
 Translation/Interpreting
 Cultural officers
 Literacy analysts and artists
 Language consultancy
 Media and advertising
 Editorial Services
 Film and Cinema Production
 General research and documentation
 Telecommunication
 Public and Private Organisations etc.

2.1.6 Course Content
Code Title Status Credits
LIN 101 Introduction to Linguistics I Compulsory (3)
LIN 102 Introduction to Linguistics II Compulsory (3)
LIN 103 Introduction to General Phonetics ICompulsory (3)
LIN 104 Introduction to General Phonetics IICompulsory(3)
LIN 105 Languages of the World Compulsory (3)
LIN 106 Traditional Grammar Compulsory (2)
LIN 107 History of Linguistics Compulsory (3)
LIN 108 Language Use and Language Attitude Compulsory(2)

200 LEVEL
LIN 201Introduction to Phonology Compulsory 2 Credits
LIN 202Phonemic Analysis Compulsory 2 Credits
LIN 203 Introduction to Morphology Compulsory 3 Credits
LIN 204Morphologies of African LanguagesCompulsory 2 Credits
LIN 205Phonetics of English and Nigerian Languages Compulsory 2 Credits
LIN 206 Orthography Design Compulsory 2 Credits
LIN 207Writing Systems: Graphic Representation Compulsory2 Credits
LIN 208 Introduction to Syntax I Compulsory 2 Credits

300 LEVEL
LIN 301 Introduction to Syntax II Compulsory 3 Credits
LIN 302 Generative Syntax Compulsory 3 Credits
LIN 303Survey of Applied Linguistics Compulsory 3 Credits
LIN 304 Field Methods and Introduction to Research Methodology Compulsory 3 Credits
LIN 305 Introduction to Sociolinguistics Compulsory 3 Credits
LIN 306 Generative Phonology Compulsory 3 Credits
LIN 316 Introduction to African Linguistics Compulsory 3 Credits
LIN 308 Error and Contrastive Analyses Compulsory 3 Credits
LIN 309 Phonetics Elective 2 Credits
LIN 310 Language Materials Development Elective 2 Credits
LIN 311 Language Testing Elective 3 Credits
LIN 313 Linguistics and Language TeachingCompulsory 2 Credits
LIN 315 Linguistics and Translation Elective 2 Credits
LIN 319 The Structure of a Nigerian Language ICompulsory2Credits
LIN 320 The Structure of a Nigerian Language IICompulsory 2Credits
LIN 322DiscourseAnalysis Elective 3 Credits

400LEVEL
LIN 401Topics in Phonolog Compulsory 2 Credits
LIN 402 Topics in Syntax Compulsory 3 Credits
LIN 403The Problems of a Multilingual NationCompulsory2 Credits
LIN 404 Semantics Compulsory 2 Credits
LIN 405Historical and Comparative LinguisticsCompulsory3 Credits
LIN 406 Dialectology Elective 3 Credits
LIN 407Lexicography Compulsory 3 Credits
LIN 408 Psycholinguistics Elective 3 Credits
LIN 409Theories of Syntax Compulsory 2 Credits
LIN 410Theories of Phonology Compulsory 2 Credits
LIN 411Experimental Phonetics Elective 2 Credits
LIN 412Phonetics of a Nigerian Language Elective 2 Credits
LIN 413Language Policy and Language PlanningCompulsory2 Credits
LIN 414Pidgin and Creole Languages Elective 2 Credits
LIN 415Yoruba Contrastive Studies Elective 2 Credits
LIN 416 Igbo Contrastive Studies Elective 2 Credits
LIN 417 Hausa Contrastive Studies Elective 3 Credits
LIN 418 Linguistics and Book Publishing Elective 3 Credits
LIN 426 Pragmatics Elective 3 Credits
LIN 499 Project Compulsory 5Credits

Course Description
100 LEVEL
LIN 101 Introduction to Linguistics 2 Credits
Definition of linguistics, its aims and scope: ¬descriptive, historical, comparative. Sociolinguistics and applied linguistics. Linguistic concepts: phoneme, distinctive features, morphemes, etc. Introduction to Linguistic methodology and formal description of language. Application of linguistics to language teaching, book publishing, machine translation, telecommunication, speech pathology and audiology, etc. Language and its relation to animal communication and other artificial forms of communication, as well as its relationship to culture.

LIN 102 Language and Society 2 Credits
The dimensions of relationship between language and society, language and perception, language in space and time, the influence of new media and ICT’s on language use.

LIN 103 Introduction to General Phonetics I 3 Credits
Phonetics as part of linguistics. Speech organs and individual functions. Airstream mechanism and their parameters for differentiating and sub-classifying them with illustrations from African languages. Also includes Practical course in ear training. Performance and transcription exercises on a variety of languages, preferably African languages. Introduction to acoustic, phonetics and the study of the non-segmental features of speech such as tone, stress and intonation.

LIN 104 Introduction to General Phonetics II 3 Credits
This course is a continuation of LIN 103, which is a prerequisite. Lin 104 In addition, the students will be expected to apply their acquired knowledge in a practical way through practice in pronunciation a d perception, the study, analysis and transcription of the speech sounds of languages (preferably African) they are familiar with. Students will be introduced to the phonetics laboratory

LIN 105 Languages of the World 2 Credits
Major language families of the world: geographical distribution and linguistic description. Characteristics of speakers, location, use, roles in education, public administration, commerce, mass media and official policy towards them (emphasis on Nigerian languages).

LIN 106 Traditional Grammar 2 Credits
Introduction to Traditional Grammar: evolution, underlying principles and assumptions. Categorization of words and structure. Sentence parsing. Specific Traditional Grammars of English and Nigerian languages.

LIN 107 History of Linguistics 2 Credits
Historical development of linguistics as a scientific discipline. Emphasis on the various 'schools' and models and the outstanding names in the discipline of linguistics. Attention to be paid to contributions to language study by linguists and institutions in Nigeria.

LIN 108 Language Use and Language Attitude 2 Credits
Uses of language in different communities: business, administration, formal education, law making, entertainment, magic, etc. Different communities' languages, the role of education, linguistic purism; aesthetic considerations, politics, religions, etc. in shaping such attitudes.
LIN 201 Introduction to Phonology (Theory and Analysis) 3 Credits
Relationship between phonetics and phonology in a structural framework and the principles of phonology. Basic tenets and analysis based on the phonemic theory, the distinctive theory, and generative phonology, distinctive and non-distinctive sounds, the phoneme and principles of phonemic analysis.

LIN 202 Phonemic Analysis 2 Credits
Introduction to phonological analysis, distribution, distinctive and non-distinctive sounds. Phonemes and the main principles of phonemic analysis.

LIN 203 Morphology 3 Credits
Definition of morphology. The morpheme, its identification and classification. Types of morphemes. Morphological processes: affixation, reduplication, compounding, suppletion, desententialization, etc. Morphological typology of languages: isolating, agglutinative and fusional languages. Lexical and grammatical categories. It also includes the analysis of the morphologies of selected African languages (e.g. Bantu and Kwa)

LIN 204 Language and Development 2 Credits
Various issues in language and development are examined. Language policy issues, language in education, globalization, language endangerment and death, urbanization, politics, technology and their impact on language. The focus is on Africa.

LIN 205 Phonetics of English and Nigerian Languages
2 Credits
Detailed phonetic description, classification and analysis of the sounds of English language in comparison with those of selected Nigerian languages.

LIN 206 Writing and Orthography 2 Credits
The aim of this course is to introduce the students to the relation between language and writing and to situate this in the context of the needs of a developing technological and literate society. It will also involve the principles and procedures in the development of orthographies.
Students will get a practical (or an unwritten language) based principally on the framework of the Orthographies of Nigerian Languages published by the National Language Centre, Lagos.

LIN 207 Introduction to Computational Linguistics 3 Credits
A general introduction to the use of computers and technologies for language documentation and analysis: introduction to concepts, technologies and basic principles or computational linguistics.

LIN 208 Introduction to Syntax I 2 Credits
An introduction to the study of syntax. Basic concepts on sentence analysis. Discussion of the basic word order as one of the universals of human languages. An introduction to syntactic rules under different grammatical models. Identification of the major lexical categories. Illustration of how determiners modify NP’s in different languages with different basic word order e.g pre-modification, post-modification, syntactic relationship, phrase structure rules, phrase markers, exemplification etc.

LIN 209 The Linguistics Situation in Africa 2 Credits
Deals with the complexity of languages in Africa, language variation, relationships, dialect geography, language planning policies and challenges, language in education, language endangerment and documentation, lingua francas, language and politics, language exclusion, etc.

LIN 301 Introduction to Syntax II 2 Credits
The sentence as a unit of linguistic description. Major constituents of a sentence;noun phrase, verb phrase, prepositional phrase, etc. Grammatical types of sentences: simple, compound, complex. Types of clause structures: main, subordinate, complement, adjunct, etc (All examined within one theory of linguistic analysis (such as generative grammar).

LIN 302 Generative Syntax 2 Credits
History, theory and practice of the generative transformational model with emphasis on the explanation of the basic assumptions, goals and concepts postulated in the model: deep and surface structures, base and transformational rules, the lexicon. Practical application of concepts and assumptions in the analysis of syntactic data: focus, relativization, passivization, deletion, ellipsis, movement, substitution, etc.

LIN 303 Survey of Applied Linguistics 2 Credits
General linguistics for practical uses and non-linguistic fields: language teaching and testing, language standardisation, planning and development, the creation of orthographies and compilation of dictionaries, telecommunication, translation, speech pathology and therapy, stylistics, language materials development. Emphasis on the role of linguistic principles and techniques in each discipline.

LIN 304 Field Methods and Introduction to Research Methodology (Practical) 3 Credits
Practical instructions in techniques involved in linguistic field work. Supervised application of techniques of data elicitation and techniques of phonological, tonemic and syntactic analysis of a Nigerian language. Organization and writing of project reports in specific domains of linguistics: descriptive and Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, etc.
LIN 305 Sociolinguistics 2 Credits
History, scope and methodology, basic concepts and application of socio-linguistics. Relationship between language and society. Emphasis on attitudes towards language varieties and social dialects, and the problems of multilingualism, and language in relation to national development.

LIN 306 Generative Phonology 3 Credits
Principles of Generative Phonology and the theory of distinctive features. Treatment of phonological processes and rules: assimilation, dissimilation, epenthesis, deletion, metathesis, coalescence, etc. Phonological representation and formulation of rules within the generative framework. Detailed study of supra-segmentals: tone, intonation, stress, pitch accent, etc. Phonological presentation and formulation of relevant phonological rules. Practical exercises in tone perception and transcription.

LIN 308 Error and Contrastive Analyses 2 Credits
Principles, goals and practice of error and contrastive analyses. Applications and limitations with respect to language materials development and second language pedagogy.

LIN 309 Phonetics 2 Credits
Acoustic phonetics and simple experimental techniques of investigating the physiological and acoustic properties of sounds. Emphasis to be on practical analysis.

LIN 310 Language Materials Development 2 Credits
Theories of language learning and their relevance in the preparation of language teaching materials. Mother tongue teaching materials. Linguistic considerations in the preparation of primers and readers, as well as in the designing of drills and exercises. Second language teaching materials. Linguistic considerations in the construction of phonetic and syntactic drill, lexical grading, and exercises. Evaluation of language textbooks and their adaptation to specific classroom situation.

LIN 313 Language Teaching and Learning 2 Credits
Introduction to the theory and practice of language teaching and language learning. The course will involve practical research, analysis of a situation and or design of a language learning or teaching material. The course also includes detailed consideration of the application of linguistics to various aspects of language teaching. First language acquisition and second language learning. Psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic factors in language learning and teaching. Linguistic technique in language teaching: error analysis, discourse analysis and language testing. Linguistic foundations of language teaching methods: grammar translation, audiolingual, cognitive code, etc.

LIN 315 Linguistics and Translation 2 Credits
Detailed consideration of the application of linguistic techniques to translation. Different types of translation. Different types of texts to be translated and the degree of equivalence required. Criteria for determining accuracy of translation. Role of referential and connotative meanings in translation. Functions of translators and interpreters in a multilingual setting. Focus will be on practical translation and interpretation.

LIN 316 Introduction to African Linguistics 3 Credits
Findings of various works on African languages with special reference to information on structural characteristics, phonological and grammatical (e.g. tone and Bantu-type Noun Classification). Classification of African languages based on their characteristics. Principles based on comparison, re-construction and classification. Phonological, morphological and syntactic characteristics of African languages or properties of various language families of Africa (e.g. Bantu and Kwa) of vowel harmony, noun classes, concord, verb serialisation, ideophones, labio-velars, clicks etc.

LIN 319 Computational Linguistics II 3 Credits
This course builds on the foundation of LIN 207. Students will be exposed to computational models, speech synthesis, speech recognition, machine translation, etc. They will undertake a small project in any Nigerian language.

LIN 320 Structure of a Nigerian Language 2 Credits
Systemic and in-depth study of aspects of a Nigerian language with emphasis on the relationship between the various levels of grammar, phonetics, phonology, morphology and syntax. It includes further application of Linguistics principles to the teaching of Nigerian Languages with emphasis on syntax.

LIN 322 Discourse Analysis 2 Credits
Introduction to the Principle and Practice of Discourse Analysis.Topics include standards of textuality, co-textual relations and critical analysis. Emphasis to be on practical analysis, study and description of relevant textual materials, such as advertisement, news headlines, cartoons, political statements, etc.

LIN 323 Introduction to Semantics 3 Credits
Introduction to the study of semantics. Place of meaning in linguistics. Theories of Meaning, use and reference. Semantic fields, synonymy, hyponymy, paraphrase, lexical and structural meanings, logical operators, quantification, scope, sense properties and sense relations, problems of word versus sentence, etc. Syntax versus semantics. Relations in semantic theories.

LIN 401 Topics in Phonology 3 Credits
Theory of generative phonology: rule formalism and ordering, morpheme structure conditions, abstractness, naturalness, etc. Problems, argumentation and evaluation of analysis. Practical problems in data analysis.

LIN 403 The Problems of a Multilingual Nation 2 Credits
Psychological and socio-cultural setting of language contact and interference, mechanism of interference, the bilingual individual’s aptitude, code switching, relative proficiency, emotional involvement, psychological theories of bilingual/multilingual settings, etc.

LIN 405 Historical and Comparative Linguistics 2 Credits
Introduction to the nature and levels of language change and genetic relationship. Techniques and methods of studying the history of language: the comparative method, internal reconstruction, lexicostatistic, etc. Exemplification from and application to Indo-European and African language families.

LIN 406 Dialectology 2 Credits
Theory of dialect differentiation with practical applications to the language(s) of the area in which the university is situated. It may also involve the use of GIS or other electro resource to develop a dialect map.

LIN 408 Psycholinguistics 2 Credits
Mechanism of first language acquisition. Behaviourist and mentalist theories of language acquisition. Language and cognitive development. Physiological and psychological aspects of speech production and perception. Language, cognition, and thought. Research concerns in various areas of psychometrics, psycholinguistics ability, tests and psychology of language.

LIN 410 Theories of Phonology 2 Credits
Goals, procedures and tenents of major current phonological theories: classical/autonomous phonemics, prosodic analysis, generative phonology, etc.

LIN 412 Phonetics of a Nigerian Language 2 Credits
Research in experimental phonetics. The phonetic properties of one or more Nigerian languages: labio-velars and pre-nasalized segments. Readings on relevant experimental research.

LIN 415 Yoruba Contrastive Studies 2 Credits
Systematic examination of the structure of Yoruba contrasted with those of Hausa, and Igbo, with emphasis on those areas requiring special attention in teaching the language to speakers of the other two languages. Preparation and evaluation of materials for teaching Yoruba as a second language. Mutually exclusive with L1Y 408.

LIN 416 Igbo Contrastive Studies 2 Credits
Systematic examination of the structure of Hausa contrasted with those of Igbo and Yoruba with emphasis on those areas requiring special attention in teaching the language to speakers of the other two languages. Preparation and evaluation of materials for teaching and testing Igbo as a second language.

LIN 417 Hausa Contrastive Studies 2 Credits
Systematic examination of the structure of Hausa as contrasted with those of Igbo and Yoruba with emphasis on those areas requiring special attention in teaching the language to speakers of the other two languages. Preparation and evaluation of materials for teaching Hausa as a second language.

LIN 421 Topics in Syntax 2 Credits
In-depth study of the theory of syntax with individual syntactic analysis of African language data: various syntactic processes, nominalization and complementation, relativization, verb serialization, apposition, etc. Emphasis on argumentation and evaluation of solutions or analyses within this theoretical framework. Working knowledge of one theory of syntax.

LIN 422 Theories of Syntax 2 Credits
Detailed discussion and emphasis of the historical antecedents and the contents of some of the current theories of syntax: Systemic Grammar, Government and Binding theory, relational Grammar, stratificational grammar, etc. and the application of any two of the models to African Languages.

LIN 424 Lexicography and Translation 2 Credits
History of lexicography, dictionaries, thesauruses and encyclopaedias. Types of dictionaries: scholastic, specialized, general purpose; dictionaries of synonyms, etc. Monolingual and bilingual dictionaries. Linguistic and non-linguistic factors in the compilation of dictionaries. Size, price-range and uses. The place and role of sociolinguistics, semantics, syntax, phonetics and phonology. Practice in constructing dictionary entries.

LIN 425 Linguistics and Book Publishing Credits
Publishing houses. Types of publishing. Types of editors: creative, procurement and copy. Requisite training. Differences between written and spoken languages. Compensatory devices built into written languages. Factors aiding or inhibiting publishing in different types of languages. Application of syntax, semantics and phonology in editing and in proof-reading. Emphasis will be on practical exercises.

LIN 426 Pragmatics 2 Credits
It focuses on the scope, goals, principles and emerging theories of pragmatics.It focuses on utterance meaning, socio-cultural and linguistic rules of correct interpretation of terms in the real world, presupposition, context, locutionary,illocutionary and perlocutionary acts, speech acts in general, intention, interference, conventional and conversational implicatures.

LIN 428 Language Policy and Planning 2 Credits
Factors relevant to language policy. Principles that determine the choice and implementation of language policy with emphasis on the techniques of language planning. Cost account analysis, principles and techniques of orthography, language codification and standardisation. Evaluation of planning and implementation of the planned language.

LIN 429 Topics in Human Language Technology 2 Credits
(Builds on LIN 319) Deals with issues related to: Software development, multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary computational models, on-line local language dictionaries and spell checkers, text mining, mobile communication, speech recognition, machine translation, software localization etc.

LIN 499 Project/Long Essay 5 Credits
Each student under the guidance of an approved supervisor is required to conduct research in an area approved by the department, culminating in the submission of a project.

SUMMARY
100 LEVEL
Compulsory Courses: LIN 101 (3), 102 (3), 103 (3), 104 (3), 105 (3), 106 (2), 107 (3), 108 (2) = 22 Credits

Required Courses: GNS 111(2), 112(2) = 4 Credits
Elective Courses: A 3 Credit course per semester in a natural language = 6 Credits
Total = 32 Credits

200 LEVEL
Compulsory Courses: LIN 201 (2), 202 (2), 203 (3), 204 (2), 205 (2), 206 (2), 207 (2), 208 (2) = 17 Credits
Required Courses: GNS 211(2), 212(2) = 4 Credits
Elective Courses: (a) A total of 6 Credit units in a natural language per session. = 6 Credits
(b) A total of 6 Credit units per session in any of the following programmes: (History, English, Sociology, Communication, Anthropology, African Languages, Religions) = 6 Credits
Total = 33 Credits

DE Students: GNS111 (2) & GNS112 (2) = 4 Credits
Total = 37 Credits

300 LEVEL
Compulsory Courses: LIN 301(3), 302(2), 303(3), 304(3), 305(3), 306(2), 316(3), 308(2), 323 (3)) = 24 Credits
Required Courses: GNS 311(2), GSE 301(3) = 5 Credits
Elective Courses: A total of 6 Credit units per session from the following courses: LIN 309 (2), 310(2), 315(2), 313 (2), 319(2), 320 (2), LIY 301 (3), 303 (3), and 322 (3) = 6 Credits
Total = 35 Credits

400 LEVEL
Compulsory Courses: LIN 401 (2), 403 (2), 405(2), 406(3), 408(3), 428(2), 421(3), 422 (2), 424 (3), 499 (5) = 27 Credits
Elective Course: A total of 6 Credit units per session from the following courses LIN 410 (2), 411 (2), 412(2), LIN 414(2), 415(2), 416(2), 417(2), 425 (2) and 426 (2) = 6 Credits
Total = 33 Credits

Graduation Requirements: UTME = 133 Credits
DE = 105 Credits

B. A. YORUBA
Objectives
The main objective of Yorùbá Programme is to produce at the end of the stipulated period of study in the University, well trained graduates of Yorùbá who have the academic expertise to contribute to the manpower needs of the nation both in the public and private sectors of economy. The goal is that when the students graduate, they will not only be able to take jobs in teaching, translation, broadcasting, journalism, publishing houses and the civil service and effectively demonstrate their linguistic and literary skills, they will be able to generate some level employment for themselves. The form of training given in the department thus involves, specified numbers of lecture hours, practical, tests and examination for each course. In the final year, the students carry out a project work on a topic of genuine academic interest, and submit 4 copies of the project to the department. Both final year examinations and projects are thoroughly assessed by reputable Yorùbá experts, as external examiners. Other major objectives of the Department of Linguistics and Nigerian Languages are:
a. to give the students an in-depth mastery of the language, literature and culture and life pattern of the Yoruba people;
b. preserve the linguistic, literacy and cultural heritage of Yoruba people;
c. offer the students the tools for the scientific study of the language;
d. equip the students with skills for the analysis of Yoruba literature and cultural issues for the purpose of applying such skills to relevant fields of human endeavour;
e. to train manpower needed for successfully implementing the laudable Nigerian National Policy on Education which stipulates that the three major Nigerian Languages, Hausa, Igbo and Yorùbá be taught in all secondary schools in Nigeria.
Other objectives are to encourage interested and talented students towards higher degree and research with possible prospects for academic career; to foster research activities among staff of the department through seminars, learned conferences and workshops. Members of the department belong to academic societies and associations at home and abroad. Notable among these are the Linguistics Association of Nigeria (LAN). Yorùbá Studies Association of Nigeria(YSAN), West African Languages Society and American Studies Association of Nigeria (ASAN). Evidences of qualitative research work done by the staff of the department are manifest in many articles published in reputable journals as well as books of high linguistics and literary qualities in the field of Linguistics and Yoruba studies.

(i) PHILOSOPHY
The philosophy of the degree programme in Yorùbá is to train students to acquire academic excellence and competence in Yorùbá Scholarship through the use of Yorùbá Language, and provision of conducive atmosphere for both staff and students to carry out academic research and contribute to the development of the country. The courses are designed to cover the most basic areas of linguistics and critical literary praxis, so that the students will have a balanced knowledge of language and literature that will enhance their professional skills and promote Yoruba language and culture.

(ii) AIM AND OBJECTIVES
The main objective of Yorùbá Programme is to produce at the end of the stipulated period of study in the University, well trained graduates of Yorùbá who have the academic expertise to contribute to the manpower needs of the nation both in the public and private sectors of economy. The goal is that when the students graduate, they will not only be able to take jobs in teaching, translation, broadcasting, journalism, publishing houses and the civil service and effectively demonstrate their linguistic and literary skills, they will be able to generate some level employment for themselves. The form of training given in the department thus involves, specified numbers of lecture hours, practical, tests and examination for each course. In the final year, the students carry out a project work on a topic of genuine academic interest, and submit 4 copies of the project to the department. Both final year examinations and projects are thoroughly assessed by reputable Yorùbá experts, as external examiners. Other major objectives of the Department of Linguistics and Nigerian Languages are:
f. to give the students an in-depth mastery of the language, literature and culture and life pattern of the Yoruba people;
g. preserve the linguistic, literary and cultural heritage of Yoruba people;
h. offer the students the tools for the scientific study of the language;
i. equip the students with skills for the analysis of Yoruba literature and cultural issues for the purpose of applying such skills to relevant fields of human endeavour;
j. to train manpower needed for successfully implementing the laudable Nigerian National Policy on Education which stipulates that the three major Nigerian Languages, Hausa, Igbo and Yorùbá be taught in all secondary schools in Nigeria.

Other objectives are to encourage interested and talented students towards higher degree and research with possible prospects for academic career; to foster research activities among staff of the department through seminars, learned conferences and workshops. Members of the department belong to academic societies and associations at home and abroad. Notable among these are the Linguistics Association of Nigeria (LAN). Yorùbá Studies Association of Nigeria (YSAN), West African Languages Society, African Literature Association, and American Studies Association of Nigeria (ASAN). Evidences of qualitative research work done by the staff of the department are manifest in many articles published in reputable journals as well as books of high linguistics and literary qualities in the field of Linguistics and Yoruba studies.

Job opportunities available for our graduates are as follows:
 Yoruba Language teaching
 Translation/Interpreting
 Cultural officers
 Literary analysts and artists
 Language consultancy
 Media and advertising
 Editorial Services
 Film and Cinema Production
 General research and documentation
 Telecommunication
 Public and Private Organisations
 Entreprenuership, etc.

Admission Requirements:

i. Direct Entry Requirements:
Candidates should have at least 5 O’Levelcredits in GCE/SSCE/NECO/Equivalent, including English Language and Yoruba, at not more than 2 sittings and at least two A’ Level passes in GCE/IJMB/Equivalent to include Yoruba and any other one Arts/Social Science/Science subject, NCE with Yoruba as a major subject, or Diploma of an accredited government tertiary institution with Yoruba as a principal subject.

ii UME Entry Requirements:
Applicants should have 5 O/L credits in GCE/SSCE/NECO/Equivalent to include English Language, Yoruba and three other Arts/Social Science subjects.

The students who come in through UME with O/Level qualifications spend four years ̀̀̀̀while those who come in with GCE A/Level/IJMB/NCE/Diploma qualifications spend three years. During the course students receive training, field methods and research experience. They submit type-written projects as part of their final year.

Course Contents
100 Level
Course Code Course Title Status Credit
LIY 101 Introduction to Yoruba People and Language Compulsory 3
LIY 102 The Yoruba Language Compulsory 2
LIY 103 Advanced Comprehension and Composition I Compulsory 3
LIY 104 Advanced Comprehension and Composition II Compulsory 3
LIY 105 Introduction to Linguistics I Compulsory 3
LIY 106 Introduction to Linguistics II Compulsory 3
LIY 107 Introduction to the History of the People Compulsory 3

200 Level
Course Code Course Title Status Credit
LIY 201 Yoruba Written Literature Compulsory 2
LIY 202 The Use of Yoruba Compulsory 3
LIY 203 Phonology of Yoruba Language I Compulsory 3
LIY 204 Introduction to Yoruba Oral Literature Compulsory 3
LIY 205 Yoruba Morphology Compulsory 3
LIY 206 Readings in Yoruba Literature Compulsory 3
LIY 207 Yoruba Syntax I Compulsory 3
LIY 208 Yoruba Folktales Compulsory 3
LIY 210 Principles and Practice of Translation Elective 3

300 Level
Course Code Course Title Status Credit
LIY 301 Phonology of Yoruba Language II Compulsory 3
LIY 302 Varieties of Poetry Compulsory 3
LIY 303 Syntax of Yoruba II Compulsory 3
LIY 304 Introduction to Drama in Yoruba Compulsory 3
LIY 305 Dialects of the Yoruba Language Compulsory 3
LIY 307 Yoruba Stylistics I Compulsory 3
LIY 308 Yoruba Literary Criticism Compulsory 3
LIY 310 Yoruba Thoughts and Beliefs Elective 3
LIY 312 Yoruba Creative Writing Elective 2
LIY 313 Yoruba Phonetics Elective 3
LIY 314 Yoruba Child Language Elective 3
LIY 315 Yoruba Speech Abnormalities Elective 3
LIY 317 Advanced Yoruba I Elective 3
LIY 318 Advanced Yoruba II Elective 3
LIY 320 Yoruba Oral Poetry II Elective 3
LIY 321 The Novels of D. O. Fagunwa Compulsory 3
LIY 322 Yoruba in Broadcasting and Advertising Compulsory 2
LIY 324 Introduction to the Yoruba Culture Compulsory 3
LIY 325 Naming in Yoruba Elective 3

400 Level
Course Code Course Title Status Credit
LIY 401 Issues in Yoruba Phonology Compulsory 3
LIY 402 Yoruba Social and Material Culture Compulsory 3
LIY 403 Issues in Yoruba Syntax Compulsory 3
LIY 404 Introduction to the Yoruba Traditional Music Compulsory 3
LIY 405 Yoruba Stylistics II Compulsory 3
LIY 406 Contemporary Yoruba Prose Fiction Compulsory 3
LIY 407 Early Yoruba Written Poetry Compulsory 3
LIY 408 Yoruba Contrastive Studies Compulsory 3
LIY 409 Yoruba Drama Compulsory
LIY 410 Contemporary Yoruba Poetry Compulsory 3
LIY 411 Novels in The Fagunwa Tradition Elective 3
LIY 499 Project Compulsory 5

Course Descriptions
LIY 101 Introduction to Yoruba People 3 Credits
Yoruba as a people, language and as an academic discipline. Emphasis on the origin of Yoruba people, their thoughts and belief systems, myths and legends. The language component includes Yoruba orthography and the history of the development of Yoruba language.
30h (T), 45h (P); C
LIY 103 Advanced Comprehension and Composition I 3 Credits
Latest version of the Yoruba orthography. Composition with emphasis on spelling, punctuation, organization and language use. Comprehension exercises. Oral delivery in the language.
30h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 104 Advanced Comprehension and Composition II 3 Credits
More emphasis on comprehension and composition to develop students’ skills in speech making and writing using various figures of speech to make the course interesting.
30h (T), 45(P); C

LIY 105 Introduction to Linguistics I 3 Credits
Definition of linguistics, its aims and scope: ¬descriptive, historical and comparative. Sociolinguistics and Applied Linguistics. Application of linguistics to language teaching, book publishing, machine translation, telecommunication, speech pathology and audiology, etc. Nature of language and its relation to animal communication and other artificial forms of communication, as well as its relationship to culture.
30h (T), 45h(P); C

LIY 106 Introduction to Linguistics II 3 Credits
Linguistic concepts: phoneme, distinctive features, morphemes, etc. Linguistic methodology and formal description of language. 30h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 102 The Yoruba Language 2 Credits
Introduction to the Yoruba language. History of Yoruba scholarship from 1800 to the present time. Yoruba cultural, literary and scholastic associations. Contemporary state of Yoruba studies. Place of Yoruba among Nigerian and West African languages. 30h (T); C

LIY 108 Introduction to the History of the People 3 Credits
Introductory historical study of the Yoruba people with particular reference to the rise and fall of the major Yoruba Kingdoms: Oyo, Egba, Ife, Owu, etc. Inter-tribal wars and the advent of colonialism. Critical examination of historical data from oral and written sources. 30h (T), 45h (P); C
LIY 201 Survey of Yoruba Written Literature 2 Credits
History of Yoruba written literature from the earliest beginning to the present day, with emphasis on how Yoruba was written, the roles of Christian missions, the early newspapers, the nationalist and cultural groups and government involvement. Selected literary works in prose, poetry and drama.
15h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 202 The Use of Yoruba 2 Credits
Trends in modern Yoruba usage. Common errors and usage. Discussion of the principles of effective written and oral communication in the language. 15h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 203 Phonology of Yoruba Language I 2 Credits
Elementary phonetic description and classification of Yoruba sounds. Patterns of co-occurrence. Discussion of contraction, assimilation and tone. 15h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 204 Introduction to Yoruba Oral Literature 2 Credits
Scope of Yoruba oral literature; its oral and written nature. Identified problems of collection, transcription and analysis. Classification into literary genres such as folktales and traditional poetic forms. 15h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 205 Yoruba Morphology 2 Credits
Detailed and systematic discussion of the structure and forms of words: nouns, emphatic and non-emphatic pronouns as well as of word-formation processes in Yoruba. 15h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 206 Readings in Yoruba Literature 3 Credits
Introduction to literary study of selected works in written literature. Poetry, drama, and various types of prose writings: novels, romances, short stories, essays, translation, etc.
30h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 207 Yoruba Syntax I 2 Credits
Introduction to the systematic study of Yoruba word-formation categories, major sentence types and grammatical analysis. 15h(T), 45h (P); C
LIY 208 Yoruba Folktales 2 Credits
Universality of folktales. Types of folktales. Motifs in folktales. The world of folktales. Characterisation, setting and techniques; performance, narration and the audience. The songs in folktales. Creativity and originality of rendering. Folktales and myths.
15h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 210 Principles and Practice of Translation 3 Credits
Basic concepts of translation: source and target languages. Types of translation. Basic consideration and limits of translation.
135h (P); E

LIY 213 Yoruba Creative Writing 3 Credits
Art of creative writing in the Yoruba language. In-depth study of the major elements in creative writing: setting, conflict, character, point of view, language, the organic whole etc. 15h (T), 45h (P); E

LIY 214 Yoruba Oral Poetry 3 Credits
Detailed study of Ese Ifa, lyerelfa and Ofo. Features of Ese Ifa, and examination of their literary features. Differences between Ese Ifa and IyereIfa. Audience participation. Sociological background, structure and the personal nature of Ofo. Practical analysis will be focused 30h (T), 45h (P); E

LIY 215 Dialects of the Yoruba Language 3 Credits
Consideration of the phonological, morphological, lexical and syntactic characteristics of the major regional and social varieties of the Yoruba language. 30h (T), 15h (P); E

LIY 217 Yoruba Phonetics 3 Credits
Consideration of the phonetics of the Yoruba language. Articulatory and distinctive feature of the phonemes of the language. (Compulsory for majors in speech' pathology and therapy Yoruba).
30h (T), 45h (P); E

LIY 301 Phonology of Yoruba Language II 3 Credits
Detailed and analytical examination of the phonological processes in Yoruba: syllable structure assimilation, nasalisation, epenthesis, vowel harmony, vowel elision, tonal processes, reduplication, loan words, etc. 30h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 303 Syntax of Yoruba II 3 Credits
Application of transformational-generative theory to the analysis of Yoruba sentences. Consideration of the major sentence types in the language: declarative, interrogative, imperative, focus, etc. as well as their grammatical analysis. 30h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 304 Introduction to Drama in Yoruba 3 Credits
Concept of drama in Yoruba language. Early attempts at play writing and play acting. Influence of traditional and folk drama. Appraisal of written plays: Adebayo Faleti, OladejoOkediji, Afolabi Olabintan and Akinwunmi Ishola. Folk operas of Hubert Ogunde, Kola Ogunmola, DuroLadipo, etc. 30h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 307 Yoruba Stylistics I 3 Credits
Yoruba stylistics. Theories and ideas of the relationship between stylistics, literature and linguistics. Various literary features and devices of the different genres of Yoruba literature.
30h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 308 Yoruba Literary Criticism 3 Credits
Classical, Western and Marxist theories of literature as they relate to prose, poetry and drama and their application to Yoruba literature. Practical application of the literary theories to Yoruba creative works. 30h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 310 Yoruba Thoughts and Beliefs 3 Credits
Detailed and analytical study of the thoughts, beliefs and religious system of the Yoruba. Olodumare. God in Yoruba belief. The Orisa origin, nature and role in the belief system and creation myths. Abiku. Belief in the use of oogun (charms) and incantations, ancestors, the priest, festivals, worship, and place of magic in Yoruba religion. 30h (T), 45h (P); E

LIY 314 Yoruba Child Language 3 Credits
Detailed study of the normal courses of speech development in Yoruba Children. (Compulsory for majors in speech pathology and therapy Yoruba). 45h (T); E
LIY 315 Yoruba Speech Abnormalities 3 Credits
Survey and discussion of significant speech abnomalities among the Yoruba. (Compulsory for majors in speech pathology and therapy Yoruba). 30h (T), 45h (P); E

LIY 317 Advanced Yoruba I 3 Credits
Readings in Yoruba Literature: prose, poetry, and drama. Advanced composition, conversation and speech making.
135h (P); E. PR: LlY 210

LIY 318 Advanced Yoruba II 3 Credits
Advanced readings in Yoruba Literature
135h (P); E. PR: LIY 317

LIY 321 The Novels of D. O. Fagunwa 3 Credits
Detailed study of the novels of D. O. Fagunwa. General consideration of the background of Fagunwa's novels: oral tradition, Christian literature and foreign literature. Features of Fagunwa's novels. The world of Fagunwa's novels. The weird elements and the problems of realism; the ideal of trilogy. 45h (T); C

LIY 322 Yoruba in Broadcasting and Advertising 2 Credits
Broadcasting and advertising. Practical aspects of broadcasting. Identification of special features of the language of broadcasting. Exploration of preparation of studio scripts for continuity announcers, presenters, and producers. Development of advertising among the Yoruba. Analysis of the distinguishing composition of original advertisement for various commodities in the Nigerian market. 15h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 323 Varieties of Yoruba Poetry 3 Credits
Poetic forms of Esa, Rara, Ijala, Oriki and other local variants like alamo; olele, and dadakuada. Consideration of their sociological background, content, structure, and functions. Recurrent themes. Place of music in the changing modes. Role of the audience. Performance and comparison of the various techniques of performing artistes. The oral artiste, his training and role, scope for originality and creativity. 30h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 324 Introduction to the Yoruba Culture 3 Credits
Yoruba culture: ways of life and institutions, kinship, marriage, child rearing, burial, inheritance, major occupations, apprenticeship system and co-operative activities. The guilds, e.g. of hunters, drummers, healers, the cults; government and administration, land tenure, administration of justice. Yoruba social system and the role of the Obas and Chiefs, Elders, Baale, and family heads etc.
30h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 325 Naming in Yoruba 3 Credits
Naming as a mental, emotional, linguistic and cultural affair. Emphasis on the linguistic and cultural importance of personal names among the Yorubas. 30h (T), 45h (P); E

LIY 328 Research Methodology in Yoruba Studies 3 Credits
Types of research methodology, current methods of data collection in literary, linguistic and cultural studies, methods of documentation and presentation of research findings, referencing styles and practical instructions on aspects of writing research reports. 30h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 401 Issues in Yoruba Phonology 3 Credits
Detailed consideration of current and relevant issues in Yoruba phonology: tones, vowel harmony, syllable structure, loan words, intonation etc. 30h (T), 45h (P); C. PR: LlY 301

LIY 402 Yoruba Social and Material Culture 2 Credits
Detailed description and analysis of the social and material aspects of Yoruba culture. 15h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 403 Issues in Yoruba Syntax 3 Credits
Current and relevant issues in Yoruba syntax: tense, aspect and their relationships, nominalisation and relativisationtopicalisation, ideophones, pronominalisation and reflexivisation, adjectives and verbs. 30h (T), 45h (P); C. PR: LlY 303

LIY 404 Introduction to the Yoruba Traditional Music 2 Credits
Form, functions and the quality of Yoruba traditional music.
15h (T), 45h (P); C
LIY 405 Yoruba Stylistics II 3 Credits
Detailed study of the stylistic features of Yoruba prose and poetry both oral and written in the language, applying the principles of discourse and textlinguistic analyses to specific works of Yoruba literature. 30h (T), 45h (P); C. PR: LlY 307

LIY 406 Contemporary Yoruba Prose Fiction 3 Credits
Detailed and analytical study of Yoruba prose fiction outside the Fagunwa tradition of novel writing. General characteristics, types (historical and social) and new trends of thrillers and detectives in Yoruba novel writing. Detailed study of specific works of Delano, Odunjo, Yemiitan, Isola, Okediji and Akinlade with emphasis on the works of one author. 30h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 408 Yoruba Contrastive Studies 3 Credits
Systematic examination of the structure of Yoruba as contrasted with those of English, Hausa and Igbo. Emphasis on those areas requiring special attention in teaching the language to speakers of the three languages. Preparation and evaluation of materials for teaching and testing Yoruba as a second language (Mutually exclusive with LIN 415). 30h (T), 45h (P); C

LIY 409 Yoruba Drama 3 Credits
Influence of Traditional and folk drama on the society. Early attempts at Yoruba play writing: E. A. Akintan; translation of Christian plays; detailed study and appraisal of plays by Faleti, Olabimtan, Isola and OkedijiOlu, Daramola and LawuyiOgunniran. Historical plays, political and social satires.
45h (T); C

LIY 412 Early Yoruba Written Poetry 3 Credits
Rise of Yoruba written poetry. Translations from English poetry. Place and role of the Church. Inspirations from Yoruba culture. Early Yoruba newspapers as a medium of literary communication. Original compositions. Poems in school textbooks. Influence of nationalist organizations: Egbe Agbaotan, Egbe OnifeileIbi Won, etc. Literary study of early Yoruba written poetry: works of SoboArobiodu, Obasa and Odunjo. 45h (T); C

LIY 410 Contemporary Yoruba Poetry 3 Credits
Critical study and appreciation of contemporary Yoruba poetry with particular reference to the works of Faleti, Esan, Ojo, Olabimtan, Oladapo, Adepoju, Aremu, Eleburu-Ibon, Arigbabuwo, Wale Akanni and others, noting their moral, religious, entertainment, commercial and sociopolitical functions. Oral performance of these poems on radio, television and recording on disc, cassettes and video tapes. 45h (T); C

LIY 499 Project 5 Credits
Each student under the guidance of an approved supervisor is required to conduct research in an area approved by the department, culminating in the submission of a project. 225h (P); C

SUMMARY

100 Level
Compulsory Courses:LIY 101(3), 103(3), 104(3), 105(3), 106(3), 102(2),108(3) =20 Credits

Required Courses:GNS 111(2) GNS 112(2) =4 CreditsElective Courses:A 3 Credit course in Linguistics per semester = 6 Credits

Total = 30 Credits

200 Level
Compulsory Courses: LIY 201(2), 202(2), 203(2), 204(2), 205(2), 206(3), 207(3), 208(2) = 18 Credits
Required Courses: GNS 211(2), 212(2), LIN 201(2), 203(3) = 9 Credits
Elective Course: A total of 6 credit units per session from the following coursesLIY 210 (3), 213 (3), 214 (3), 215 (3); 217 (3); 225(3) = 6 Credits
Total = 33 Credits
For D/E studentsGNS 111 (2) & 112 (2) = 4 Credits Total = 36 Credits
300 Level

Compulsory Courses: LIY 301(3), 303(3); 304(3), 307(3), 308(3), 321(3), 322(2), 323 (2), 324(3), 328 (3); = 28 Credits
Required Courses: GNS 311(2), GSE 301(3) = 5 Credits

Total = 33 Credits

400 Level
Compulsory Courses: LIY 401(3),402(2), 403(3), 404(2), 405(3),406(3), 408(3),409(3), 410 (3), 412(3), 499(5)
Total= 33 Credits

To be eligible for the award of a degree, a student must obtain a total of 120 Credits in a 4 -year degree programme, 90 Credits in a 3 year degree programme including those earned in GNS 111, 112, 211, 212, 311 and GSE 301.

2.3. B. A. IGBO

PHILOSOPHY
The philosophy of degree programmes in Nigerian Languages is to contribute to the development of language aspects of national growth, dissemination of information, societal integration and national unity. The University believes that the introduction of these language programmes will contribute to the realization of the objective of National Policy on Education, and to the spread of major indigenous languages in the regions other than that of their native speakers. As such the Department of Linguistics and Nigerian languages was established to train the manpower needed for implementing language policy as enshrined in the National Policy on Education (NPE) by offering Bachelor programmes in Yoruba, Hausa and Igbo in addition to Linguistics.

AIM AND OBJECTIVES

i. To equip students with up-to-date linguistic background to the acquisition of a language.
ii. To develop our indigenous languages for their adequacy in various social endeavors: education, mass media, self-improvement at grassroots level, translation, publishing and similar social engineering.
iii. To prepare grounds for social unity and conflict resolution.
iv. To create avenue for the development of veritable indigenous languageprogrammes and databanks for international academic cooperation.
v. To create a programme for further studies and research.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENT
(i) Direct Entry:
(a) At least 5 ‘O’ Level credits passes including English Language, Igboand at least 2 ‘A’ Level passes in GCE/IJMB to include Igbo and any other one Arts/Social Sciences/Science subject.
(b) NCE with at least Igbo Language as a major subject and any other one Arts/Social Sciences/Science subject, in addition to at least 5 ‘O’ Level credit passes including English Language and Igbo.
(c) Diploma in Igbo or Linguistics from an accredited tertiary institution in addition to at least 5 ‘O’ Level credit passes including English Language and Igbo.

(ii) UTME Entry:
At least 5 O’Level credit passes in GCE/SSCE/NECO or equivalent to include English Language, Igbo Language and three other Arts/Social Sciences/Science subjects.

COURSE CONTENT
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
100 LEVEL
HARMATTAN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIG 101 History and Culture of the Igbo People 3 C
LIG 111 Practical Laboratory Work in Igbo I 1 C
LIG 121 Igbo Sound System and Orthography 3 C
LIG 151 Use of Igbo I 3 C
LIN 101 Introduction to Linguistics I 3 C
LIN 106 Traditional Grammar 2 C
GNS111 Use of English 1 2 R
TOTAL 17

RAIN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIG 112 Practical Laboratory Work in Igbo II 1 C
LIG 132 Igbo Grammar I 3 C
LIG 142 Igbo Phonology 3 C
LIG 152 Use of Igbo II 3 C
LIN 102 Introduction to Linguistics II 3 C
LIN 108 Language Use and Language Attitude 2 C
GNS 112 Use of English II 2 R
TOTAL 17
Grand Total for the year 34
200 LEVEL
HARMATTAN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIG 201 Aspects of Igbo Culture 3 C
LIG 221 Igbo Sound System 3 C
LIG 231 Igbo Grammar II 3 C
LIG 271 Igbo Oral Literature I 3 C
LIN 201 Introduction to Phonology 3 C
LIN 207 Writing Systems: Graphic Representation 3 C
GNS 211 Philosophy, Logic and Nigerian Culture 2 R
TOTAL 20
RAIN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIG 202 An Introduction to Translation 3 C
LIG 212 Practical Laboratory Work in Igbo II 2 C
LIG 232 Igbo Morphology 3 C
LIG 242 Readings in Igbo Literature 3 C
LIG 252 Use of Igbo II 3 C
LIG 272 Igbo Oral Literature II 3 C
GNS 212 Introduction to Social Sciences and Citizenship Education 2 R
19
Grand Total (Year 2) 39

300 LEVEL
HARMATTAN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIG 331 Igbo Grammar III 3 C
LIG 351 Use of Igbo IV 2 C
LIN 301 Introduction to Syntax 3 C
LIN 303 Survey of Applied Linguistics 3 C
LIN 313 Linguistics and Language Teaching 3 C
LIN 315 Linguistics and Translation 2 C
GNS 311 History and Philosophy of Science 2 R
GSE 301 Graduate Self Employment 3 R
TOTAL 21

RAIN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIG 342 Practical Translation I 3 C
LIG 362 Acculturation 3 C
LIG 372 Introduction of Igbo Novels 3 C
LIG 382 Research Methods in Igbo 2 C
LIG 384 Igbo Poetry 3 C
LIN 306 Generative Phonology 3 C
LIN 310 Language Material Development 3 C
TOTAL 20
Grand Total (Year 3) 41

400 LEVEL
HARMATTAN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIG 411 Creative Writing in Igbo I 3 C
LIG 431 Issues in Igbo Phonology 3 C
LIG 433 Issues in Igbo Morphology and Syntax 3 C
LIG 441 Practical Translation II 3 C
LIG 471 Introduction to Dramatic Literature 3 C
LIN 417 Igbo Contrastive Studies 3 C
TOTAL 18

RAIN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIG 452 Creative Writing in Igbo II 3 C
LIG 462 Igbo Dialect survey 3 C
LIN 305 Introduction to Sociolinguistics 3 C
LIN 404 Semantics 2 C
LIG 499 Project 5 C
16
Grand Total (Year 4) 34

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
100 Level
LIG 101 HISTORY AND CULTURE OF THE IGBO PEOPLE. 3 Credits
Introductory lessons on the Igbo people: where they can be found, their distant and current history, their characteristics, family relationship, value system and religion.
30h (T) 45h (P); C

LIG 111 PRACTICAL LABORATORY WORK IN IGBO I 1 Credits
Conversation and reading skills, intensive laboratory session and training/ drills in sounds, aural and oral comprehension. 45h (P); C

LIG 112 PRACTICAL LABORATORY WORK IN IGBO II 1 Credit
Continuation of LIG 111 45h (P); C. Pre: LIG 111

LIG 121 IGBO SOUND SYSTEM AND ORTHOGRAPHY 3 Credits
Igbo consonants and vowels. Organs of speech and speech mechanism. The basic principles of which a good orthography is based with special reference to spelling, tone, drills, pronunciation, etc. Issues in Igbo orthography. Though this course has some theoretical components, lecturers are to note that practical drills and practice are essential parts of the teaching. 15h (T)90h (P);C

LIG 132 IGBO GRAMMAR I 3 Credits
Morpheme, word and phrase, Structural exercise in word-building, Study of the various linguistic forms affecting word composition or formation.30h (T); 45h (P);

LIG 142 IGBO PHONOLOGY 3 Credits
Significant sounds in Igbo, tone, and introduction to phonological processes in Igbo. 30h (T); 45h (P); C

LIG 151 USE OF IGBO I 3 Credits
Word recognition, sentence and paragraph comprehension. Integrating of words, phrases and sentences for meaning attainment. Vocabulary building through extensive reading. Listening to recorded short stories and anecdotes from native speakers. Familiarization with genre and diction in Igbo. 15h (T); 90h (P); C
LIG 152 USE OF IGBO II 3 Credits
Continuation of LIG 151. In addition, short folk tales are made available for comprehension, and appreciation. 30h (T); 45h (P); C. Pre: LIG 151

200 LEVEL
LIG 201 ASPECTS OF IGBO CULTURE 3 Credits Traditional Institutions, e.g. marriage, burial, festivals, etc., traditional occupation such as blacksmithing, dying, farming, pottery, carving, poultry, banking, etc. , impact of modernism/technology (production procedures then and now) 30h(T); 45h (P); C

LIG 202 INTRODUCTION TO TRANSLATION 3 credits
Simple passages from primers translated, with emphasis on accuracy of tense and aspect and morphological shapes (gender, number and person).
15h (T); 90h (P); C.

LIG212 PRACTICAL LABORATORY WORK IN IGBO II 2 Credits
Practical exercises in the laboratory. Advanced work on LIG 112. A careful selection of tapes recorded from native speakers. Interaction with local native speakers. 90h (P); C Pre: 112

LIG221 Igbo SOUND SYSTEM 3 Credits
Phonemic classification of Igbo sounds: examination of their co-occurrence patterns with particular reference to selected native words and assimilated loan words; discussion of contraction, assimilation and tone change. Works on Igbo tonology. Copious exercises in transcription. 15h (T; 90h (P); C Pre: LIG 121

LIG 231 Igbo GRAMMAR II 3 Credits
Word classes: nouns, verbs, pronouns, adjectives, etc. Igbo functional categories: tense, aspect and mood, gender, etc. 30h (T); 45h (P); C. Pre: LIG 132

LIG232 Igbo MORPHOLOGY 3 Credits
Definition, identification and classification of morphemes in Igbo, detailed discussions of various morphological processes in the language, exercise in simple morphological analysis.
30h (T); 45h (P); C

LIG 242 READINGS IN IGBO 3 Credits
Literary study of selected works in Igbo written literature poetry, drama, and various types of prose writings, such as novels short stories, essays, etc.
30h (T)’ 45h (P); C.
LIG 252 USE OF IGBO III 3 Credits
- Dictation, comprehension and use of registers. Oral recalls of narrated stories. Continuation of LIG 152. 30h (T); 45h (P); C Pre: LIG 152

LIG 271 IGBO ORAL LITERATURE I 3 Credits
Study and operation of Folktales, songs, poetry, short stories, etc.
30h (T); 45h (P)

LIG 272 IGBO ORAL LITERATURE 3 Credits
Listening to models of songs, chants, story-telling and traditional dramatic styles for the acquisition of primary competence. Student participation in forms of dramatization, paraphrases and memorization of proverbs and adages. 30h (T); 45h (P); C. Pre: LIG 172

300 LEVEL
LIG 331 Igbo GRAMMAR 3 Credits
Principal units involved in grammatical description: clauses and sentences, constituents and sentence types. Structure and use of sentences. Complexity of sentences. Identifiers for sentence types by use (Question, emphasis, request…). Advanced work on LIG 231 30h (T); 45h (P); C. Pre: LIG 231

LIG 342 PRACTICAL TRANSLATION I 3 Credits
Translating news texts and historical documents in English into Igbo and vice versa, and analysis of samples of translated texts. 15h (T); 90h (P); C. Pre: LIG 241
LIG 351 USE OF IGBO IV 2 Credits
Composition with emphasis on spelling, punctuation, organization and general mechanical accuracy. Use of elaborate rhetorical devices (proverbs and adages, allusions and idioms). Advanced work on LIG 252
15h (T); 45h (P); C. Pre: LIG 252

LIG 362 Acculturation 3 Credits
Students to get to know the material culture of the people: food, clothing, dressing, hospitality, marriage, birth, death, taboos, and various ceremonies. As part of the course requirements, students spend a minimum of 6 weeks in an environment where the language is spoken as a first language. They are expected to live among native speakers of Igbo in order to improve their spoken skills. The department will liaise with relevant authorities in places where the students will spend this period. Each student will prepare a guided report on this part of acculturation. 135h (P); C.

LIG 372 INTRODUCTION TO IGBO NOVELS 3 Credits
Literary study of selected Igbo novelists and possibly their periods.
30h (T); 45h (P); C.

LIG 382 RESEARCH METHODS IN IGBO 2 Credits
A study of field methods in Igbo language and literature, data collection, transcription and translation; interviewing of informants, administration of questionnaire, outline of research project, bibliography, notes and references; etiquettes in field work. 15h (T); 45h (P); C

LIG 384 IGBO POETRY3 Credits
A survey and appreciation of Igbo Poetry and popular songs.
30h (T); 45h (P); C.

400 LEVEL
LIG 411

CREATIVE WRITING IN IGBO I 3 Credits
Practical exercises in the laboratory. Advanced work on LIG 311. Students to fine-tune their performance and skills.
15h (T); 90h (P); C Pre: LIG 211

LIG 431 ISSUE IN IGBO PHONOLOGY 3 Credits
Phonemic classification of Igbo sounds, examination of their patterns of occurrence, phonological processes in Igbo syllable structure, assimilation, nasalization, vowel harmony, phonological changes in loan words and phonological variation in Igbo dialects, etc.
30h (T); 45h (P); C Pre: LIG 142

LIG 433 ISSUES IN IGBO MORPHOLOGY & SYNTAX 3 Credits
Characteristics and sub classes of the various parts of speech: nouns, verbs, qualifiers, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, tense and aspect, Igbo sentence types. Complex structures continued. Advanced work on LIG 331 30h (T); 45h (P); C. Pre: LIG 331

LIG 441 PRACTICAL TRANSLATION II 3 Credits
Translating poetry, prose, technical and socio-cultural texts in Igbo into English and vice versa, and analysis of samples of translated texts.
15h (T); 90h (P); C. Pre: LIG 342

LIG 452 CREATIVE WRITING IN IGBO II 3 Credits
Conceptual and practical aspects of literary creation in Igbo prose, poetry and play writing, expository writing for a variety of audience, promotion and evaluation of creative expertise, critique of native artistes, short-term apprenticeship to a native artiste. 30h (T); 45h (P); C. Pre: LIG 382

LIG 462 IGBO DIALECT SURVEY 3 Credits
Survey of spoken Igbo, identification of marks of regionalism, isolation of significant isoglosses, use of dialects, comparison with the standard form.
30h (T); 45h (P); C.

LIG 471 INTRODUCTION TO DRAMATIC LITERATURE 3 Credits
The concept of drama in language and literature, survey of early attempts at play writing and play acting in Igbo, the influence of Igbo traditional and folk drama, major phases and developments of Igbo drama, appraisal of written plays and study of popular Igbo drama. 30h (T); 45h (P), C

LIG 499 PROJECT 5 Credits
Supervised independence research of 5,000 – 8,000 on an aspect of Igbo language or literature, presented in the form of a typewritten and professionally bound research work. Topics chosen by students and presented to the Department for approval at the beginning of students’ final year.
225h (P); C. Pre: LIG 382

GRADUATION REQUIREMENT
(i) A minimum pass in 148 credits for intakes into a 4-year degree programme.
(ii) A minimum pass in 118 credits for Direct Entry intakes into a 3-year degree programme.
(iii) Minimum No. of years for graduation: …
UMTE 4 Years, Direct Entry 3 Years
(iv) Minimum residency requirement in years, if any Nil
(v) Minimum CGPA for graduation: 1.00.
(vi) Other requirements (please specify):… Nil

B. A. HAUSA

Philosophy
The philosophy of degree programmes in Nigerian Languages is to contribute to the development of language aspects of national growth, dissemination of information, societal integration and national unity. The University believes that the introduction of these language programmes will contribute to the realization of the objective of National Policy on Education, and to the spread of major indigenous languages in the regions other than that of their native speakers. As such the Department of Linguistics and Nigerian languages was established to train the manpower needed for implementing language policy as enshrined in the National Policy on Education (NPE) by offering Bachelor programmes in Yoruba, Hausa and Igbo in addition to Linguistics.

AIMS/OBJECTIVES
vi. To equip students with up-to-date linguistic background to the acquisition of a language.
vii. To develop our indigenous languages for their adequacy in various social endeavors: education, mass media, self-improvement at grassroots level, translation, publishing and similar social engineering.
viii. To prepare grounds for social unity and conflict resolution.
ix. To create avenue for the development of veritable indigenous language programmes and databanks for international academic cooperation.
x. To create a programme for further studies and research.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENT
Direct Entry:
(a) At least 5 O’Level credits passes including English Language, Hausa and at least 2 A’Level passes in GCE/IJMB to include Hausa and any other one Arts/Social Sciences/Science subject.
(b) NCE with at least Hausa Language as a major subject and any other one Arts/Social Sciences/Science subject, in addition to at least 5 ‘O’ Level credit passes including English Language and Hausa.
(c) Diploma in Hausa or Linguistics from an accredited tertiary institution in addition to at least 5 ‘O’ Level credit passes including English Language and Hausa.
UTME Entry:
At least 5 O’Level credit passes in GCE/SSCE/NECO or equivalent to include English Language, Hausa Language and three other Arts/Social Sciences/Science subjects.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
100 LEVEL
HARMATTAN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIH 101 History and Culture of the Hausa People 3 C
LIH 111 Practical Laboratory Work in Hausa I 1 C
LIH 121 Hausa Sound System and Orthography 3 C
LIH 151 Use of Hausa I 3 C
LIN 101 Introduction to Linguistics I 3 C
LIN 106 Traditional Grammar 2 C
GNS111 Use of English 1 2 R
TOTAL 17

RAIN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIH 112 Practical Laboratory Work in Hausa II 1 C
LIH 132 Hausa Grammar I 3 C
LIH 142 Hausa Phonology 3 C
LIH 152 Use of Hausa II 3 C
LIN 102 Introduction to Linguistics II 3 C
LIN 108 Language Use and Language Attitude 2 C
GNS 112 Use of English II 2 R
TOTAL 17
Grand Total for the year 34

200 LEVEL
HARMATTAN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIH 201 Aspects of Hausa Culture 3 C
LIH 221 Hausa Sound System 3 C
LIH 231 Hausa Grammar II 3 C
LIH 271 Hausa Oral Literature I 3 C
LIN 201 Introduction to Phonology 3 C
LIN 207 Writing Systems: Graphic Representation 3 C
GNS 211 Philosophy, Logic and Nigerian Culture 2 R
TOTAL 20

RAIN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIH 202 An Introduction to Translation 3 C
LIH 212 Practical Laboratory Work in Hausa II 2 C
LIH 232 Hausa Morphology 3 C
LIH 242 Readings In Hausa Literature 3 C
LIH 252 Use of Hausa II 3 C
LIH 272 Hausa Oral Literature II 3 C
GNS 212 Introduction to Social Sciences and Citizenship Education 2 R
19
Grand Total (Year 2) 39

300 LEVEL
HARMATTAN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIH 331 Hausa Grammar III 3 C
LIH 351 Use of Hausa IV 2 C
LIN 301 Introduction to Syntax 3 C
LIN 303 Survey of Applied Linguistics 3 C
LIN 313 Linguistics and Language Teaching 3 C
LIN 315 Linguistics and Translation 2 C
GNS 311 History and Philosophy of Science 2 R
GSE 301 Graduate Self Employment 3 R
TOTAL 21
RAIN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIH 342 Practical Translation I 3 C
LIH 362 Acculturation 3 C
LIH 372 Introduction of Hausa Novels 3 C
LIH 382 Research Methods in Hausa 2 C
LIH 384 Hausa Poetry 3 C
LIN 306 Generative Phonology 3 C
LIN 310 Language Material Development 3 C
TOTAL 20
Grand Total (Year 3) 41

400 LEVEL
HARMATTAN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIH 411 Creative Writing in Hausa I 3 C
LIH 431 Issues in Hausa Phonology 3 C
LIH 433 Issues in Hausa Morphology and Syntax 3 C
LIH 441 Practical Translation II 3 C
LIH 471 Introduction to Dramatic Literature 3 C
LIN 417 Hausa Contrastive Studies 3 C
TOTAL 18

RAIN SEMESTER
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE CREDITS STATUS
LIH 452 Creative Writing in Hausa II 3 C
LIH 462 Hausa Dialect survey 3 C
LIN 305 Introduction to Sociolinguistics 3 C
LIN 404 Semantics 2 C
LIH 499 Project 5 C
16
Grand Total (Year 4) 34
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
100 Level
LIH 101 HISTORY AND CULTURE OF THE HAUSA PEOPLE. 3 Credits
Introductory lessons on the Hausa people: where they can be found, their distant and current history, their characteristics, family relationship, value system and religion. 30h (T) 45h (P); C

LIH 111 PRACTICAL LABORATORY WORK IN HAUSA I 1 Credit
Conversation and reading skills, intensive laboratory se

About Faculty of Arts Research

Important Dates

December 13, 2021

Continuous Assessment

January 14, 2022

End of Rain Semester Lectures

January 17, 2022

Lecture Free Week for Revision

January 24, 2022

Commencement of Rain Semester Examination

February 11, 2022

End of Rain Semester Examinations