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Fabian Aiterebhe Ehikhamenor

Prof Ehikhamenor

Position/Status:  Professor
Office:  Head, Department of Information and Communication Science

Telephone:   0802 290 2806  // 0807 615 5302 //  0703 378 4996
E-mail:   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.,   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.,   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

University Education
1. University of Ife, Ile-Ife, Nigeria, September 1970 - June 1973
2. University of Ife, Ile-Ife, Nigeria, September 1974 - October 1975
3. University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria, October 1977 - September 1978
4. Drexel University, Philadelphia, U.S.A., September 1984 - June 1987

Academic Qualifications
1. B.Sc. (Geology Major, Chemistry, Biology) 1973, University of Ife
2. M.Sc. (Geology) 1976, University of Ife
3. M.L.S. (Library Science) 1978, University of Ibadan
4. Ph.D. (Information Science) 1987, Drexel University

Honours, Distinctions and Membership of Learned Societies
 (a) Consultant, Systems Analysis (September - December 1988)
Information Services Division, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, Nigeria
(b) Consultant, UNESCO Project (February to June, 1991)
Assessment of the status of information technology and information needs of UNESCO member states. Executed for the National Library of Nigeria
(c) Senate Representative on the University Library Committee (1991 – 1995)
     (d) Member, University ICT Committee (1996 – 1999)
(e) External Examiner, Department of Library and Archival Studies, University of Ghana, Legon (1997-1999)

Fellowships, Grants and Visiting Positions
(a)  IDRC Fellowship, September 1984 – August 1987
(b) Senate Research Grant, University of Ibadan, 1995
(c)  Visiting Reader, Delta State University, Abraka (October 2001 – February 2004)
(d) Visiting Professor, University of Ilorin, Ilorin (July 2009 – Present)

Professional Activities
(a) Nigerian Library Association (NLA)
(b) Computer Association of Nigeria (COAN)
(c) Consultant, Systems Analysis (September - December 1988): Information Services Division, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, Nigeria
(d) Consultant, UNESCO Project (February to June, 1991): Assessment of the status of information technology and information needs of UNESCO member states. Executed for the National Library of Nigeria
(e) Member of the Editorial Board, African Journal of Library, Archives, and Information Science, (1991 – 1995)
(f) Member of the Editorial Board, Library and Information Science Review, 1994 -
(g) Member, University ICT Committee (1996 – 1999)  

My Research and Contributions to Knowledge
My research efforts have been concentrated mainly in the area of information systems and technology.

My early research work was devoted to the information needs, information resources availability and utilisation, and communication patterns and network structure in scientific research in Nigerian universities.  The intention was to contribute to an understanding of the basic considerations in the development of appropriate information systems in support of scientific research in Nigeria. My work in this area demonstrated the centrality of the role of informal communication as a driving force in scientific research in Nigeria. Although informal communication is a normal activity of scientific research, its importance was much greater in Nigeria than it was in the Western world. The implication of this was that any conception or configuration of information systems and services for scientific research in Nigeria must support informal communication and facilitate inter-personal contacts and newsgroups.

Considering the crucial role that university libraries had to play in the development or evolution of scientific information systems in Nigeria, attention was given to the motivating factors in the automation of their processes and services, their preparedness to provide access to local and international databases and information systems, their planning models and implementation options. The main finding in the studies was that very little progress had been made in library automation. While noting the prevailing constraints, the studies identified various developments and opportunities that could facilitate the automation process.

It was also necessary to explore the conceptual and mental orientation and organisational commitment across the country to a centrally planned programme of developing scientific and technological information systems. The findings of the studies in this area indicated that information organisations and specialists had been adequately sensitised and enthused to embrace such a programme. What was lacking and, in fact, urgently needed was a policy framework for regulating and coordinating independent efforts in the development of information systems. Another outcome of these studies was the articulation of a national institutional framework for such a programme.

Although there were infrastructural problems hindering the successful execution of the programme recommended, there was still ground for optimism that given the necessary policy framework and political will to enforce it, it was possible to make progress. Then arose the question of how to initiate the policy framework and generate the political will. Usually policies are initiated on the strength of popular demand or pressure from relevant bodies and groups. Was the Nigerian society sufficiently equipped to appreciate the importance of and developments in information technology to inspire a serious discussion on the policy framework? One of the studies showed that the society was not sufficiently familiar with developments in information technology to generate the concern for a national information technology policy. The findings and conclusions of these studies constituted a warning that Nigeria was in danger of being isolated in what was emerging as an information economy. Indeed, Nigeria did not wake up to this reality until 2001, when the Nigerian National Policy for Information Technology was published.

Before this policy came into being, some organisations had started investing in information technology with varying levels of success. It was necessary to identify and understand the success factors as well as factors that were responsible for failed implementations or the non-adoption of information technology. In the print media industry my research has not only identified these factors, but brought to the fore a link between success in information technology applications and the state of the economy and the political situation in the country. This link had never been recognised in previous studies on information technology applications and information systems in developing countries.

The level of success in the banking sector was even lower. By 2000, not up to 40% of the banks that reported any success at all actually realised the expected benefits. The banks that recorded successful implementations and realised the benefits they expected were prepared to invest more in information technology. The study identified the business areas of applications in which investment in information technology was to be expected. On the contrary, the banks that were not successful were disillusioned and were not interested in further investment in information technology. Nevertheless, considering the growing intensity of inter-bank competition and rapid transformation of the banking sector by the dynamics of globalisation, the study concluded that there would be an upsurge of investment, led by the banks that styled themselves as progressive and had already made some success in information technology implementations. Indeed, this scenario started playing out within three years, and information technology became a central issue in inter-bank competition.

The Internet, which is the fastest growing area of information technology, has assumed a role whose future impact is most likely to be far-reaching if not bewildering. Certainly the Internet already means much to a vast number of people all over the world, especially students and researchers. By 2000, it had already become a major source of research information as well as a gateway to a large number of scientific databases. Were the scientists in Nigerian universities prepared to be integrated into a new scientific community where old values and procedures would be swept away in a relentless march towards the much-publicised paperless society? My studies on the use and non-use of the Internet resources by Nigerian universities scientists, and the impact of the Internet on scientific communication process and productivity showed that the level of use of the resources was minimal and that the scientists were not adequately equipped to function in the scientific communication system of the future. It also showed that while there was a correlation between the number of contacts maintained by the scientists and their productivity, the Internet contributed little to facilitate those contacts or improve productivity. Contrary to the findings of many previous studies, the low level of use could not be attributed to ignorance of the resources available on the Internet, anarchistic nature of Internet culture, poor quality of information, or lack of quality control, but rather to institutional tardiness, problems of accessibility, navigational difficulties, and costs. The significance of these findings was that they forcefully demonstrated the urgent and crucial task of addressing the issue of access to information technology and information for research.

Software is at the core of information systems and technology. An area where the response of Nigeria to the challenges of information technology may be evaluated is the software market. My study of software marketing in Nigeria revealed that by 2002, the software industry was relatively young and that the market was dominated by products from foreign countries. The software companies in the country were essentially agents to overseas developers. So, the aggressive and innovative marketing approaches, including database marketing techniques and targeted communications, which characterise software marketing in Western countries, was virtually absent in Nigeria. The significance of these findings was that they indicated an agenda for information technology in Nigeria. Although Nigeria had made an official commitment to develop information technology and use it to leverage national development, tremendous political will and coordinated considerable efforts were still required to address the critical issue of local content in software products in the market. A bold programme and initiatives to stimulate indigenous software development must be embarked on as a matter of urgency.

Work in Progress

  1. Demand and Support for Software Applications Integration in Nigeria.

It was originally to be a joint study with Dr A. A. Bamitale of the Africa Regional Centre for Information Science, University of Ibadan, but was suspended. It is addressing the engineering considerations, including hardware architecture, functionality of user interface, and the capabilities of operating systems, that have been at the core of the efforts towards meeting a growing demand for software applications integration. Against the backdrop of these developments, the study is addressing the level of demand and the availability of hardware and software support to meet such a demand in Nigeria.


Some of his publications are:

(i) Books, Chapters in Books, Proceedings
1.  Odeinde, T. Olabisi and Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1981), "The role of university libraries in the dissemination of scientific and technological information", In: World Federation of Engineering Organizations. International Conference on Delivery Mechanisms for Engineering and Technological Information, Budapest, 3 - 5 November, 1980. Budapest: OMKDK-TECHNOINFORM, p. 53-57.

2.  Odeinde, T. O. and Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1981), " The importance of standards. In: Papers Presented at the Seminar on Nigerian University Library Standards, Maiduguri, Nigeria, 29   31 October. 

3.  Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1989). " New information technology applications. In: Eyitayo, A. O. and Ubogu, F. N. (eds.). Planning for library automation". Seminar Proceedings. Ibadan: Information Technology Application and Research  Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Ibadan, p. 70 75.

4.   Eyitayo, A. O. and Ehikhamenor, F. A. (eds). (1990).     "Microcomputers in the library, documentation, publishing and information centre". Workshop Proceedings. Ibadan: Information Technology Application and Research Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, 85p.

5.   Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1990), " Indexing and Abstracting". In: Eyitayo, A. O. and Ehikhamenor, F. A. (eds).  Microcomputers in the library, documentation, publishing and information centre. Workshop Proceedings. Ibadan: Information Technology Application and Research Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, p. 22 29.

6.   Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1990).  "Information storage and retrieval". In: Eyitayo, A. O. and Ehikhamenor, F. A. (eds). Microcomputers in the library, documentation, publishing and information centre. Workshop Proceedings. Ibadan: Information Technology Application and Research Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, p. 30 36.

(ii) Articles in learned journals
7.  Aiyepeku, Wilson O. and Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1979) "A bibliometric and content analysis of socio-economic research" ,in NJESS 1959 - 1978. Nigerian Journal of Economic and Social Studies, Vol. 21, No. 1-3, 1-35.
8.  Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1983),  "Collection development under constraints", Nigerian Journal of Library and Information Science Review, Vol. 1, No. 1, 42-56.
9.  Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1983)  "A formula for allocating book funds: The search for simplicity and flexibility." Libri, Vol. 33, No. 2, 148-161.
10. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1984)  "Evaluation of science and technology journals at Ibadan", University Library. Nigerian Journal of Library and Information Studies, Vol. 2, No. 1, 19-40.
11. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1988)  "Perceived state of science in Nigerian universities",  Scientometrics, Vol. 13, No.5-6, 225-238.
12. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1990), "A bibliometric and historical analysis of geological  publications in Nigeria," 1900 - 1965. Journal of Mining and Geology, Vol. 26, No. 2, 193-199.
13. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1990)  "Informal scientific communication in Nigerian universities". Journal of the American Society for Information Science, Vol. 41, No. 6, 419-426.
14. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1990)  "Productivity of physical scientists in Nigerian universities in relation to communication variables", Scientometrics, Vol. 18, No. 5-6, 437-444.
15. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1990)  "Aspects of the publication cycle of physical scientists in some Nigerian universities." Journal of Information Science: Principles and Practice, Vol. 16, 257-263.
16. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1990)  "The use of formal information sources in physical science research in Nigerian universities." International Library Review, Vol. 22, 149-161.
17. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1990)  "Automation in Nigerian university libraries: Progress or mirage." Nigerian Journal of Library and Information Science Review, Vol. 8, No. 1, 1-11
18. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1991)  "Rationalizing the development of scientific and technical information systems in Nigeria". Annals of Library Science and Documentation,  Vol. 38, No. 4, 148-152.
19. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1993), " Information technology and scientific and technological information in Nigeria: evolution or evolution?",  African Journal of Library, Archives, and Information Science, Vol. 3, No. 2, 113-123.
20. Apalayine, G. B. & Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1996) "The information needs and sources of  primary health care workers in the Upper East Region of Ghana", Journal of Information Science, Vol. 22, No. 5, 367-373.
21. Njongmeta, L. M. & Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1998)  "Health information needs and services in Cameroon", African Journal of Library, Archives, and Information Science, Vol. 8, No. 1, 13-22.
22. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (1999) "Cognitive information foundation of university students: Index of information and communication technology in Nigeria",  Information Technology for Development, Vol. 8, No. 3, 139-144.
23. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (2000),  "Towards a new information management culture in Nigerian Public sector", Nigerian Journal of Economic and Social Studies, Vol. 42, No. 2, pp173-183.
24. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (2002)  "Socio-economic factors in the application of information and communication technologies in Nigerian print media", Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Vol. 53, No. 7, 602-611.
25. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (2003) "Information technology in Nigerian banks: The limits of expectations." Information Technology for Development Vol.10, No.1, 13-24.
26. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (2003) "The information society and the Nigerian print media." African Journal of Library, Archives, and Information Science, Vol. 13, No. 2, 187 – 199. 
27. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (2003) "Internet facilities: use and non-use by Nigerian university  scientists." Journal of Information Science, Vol.29, No.1, 35-48.
28. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (2003) "Internet resources and productivity in scientific research in  Nigerian universities." Journal of Information Science, Vol.29, No.2, 107-116.
29. Ehikhamenor, F. A. (2003) "Software marketing in Nigeria", Information Development, Vol. 19,  No. 1, 43-49. 

(iii) Books and Chapters in Books
30. Ehikhamenor, F. A.  Information systems development: Managerial strategies and methods. In: M. A. Tiamiyu (ed), Information Science: Concepts, Models and Methods. (Readings in Information Science Series), Africa Regional Centre for Information Science, University of Ibadan, pp 98 – 125. [Accepted for Publication in April, 2003]

(iv) Technical Reports
31.  Ehikhamenor, Fabian & Roberts, Carolyn W.  (1985) Transfer Credits System: A database system for students of the College of Information Studies, Drexel University: College of Information Studies, Drexel University, Philadelphia, U.S.A., 48p. 
32. Ehikhamenor, F.A. (1988). Library and Documentation Centre: Staff Manual. Library and Documentation Centre, IITA, Ibadan, 104p. [A report on a systems analysis and staff manual development project executed for IITA]

 

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